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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We have had Sulu for about 2 months, and are quickly learning how expensive grooming can be. He has a very fluffy and thick coat, with lots of crazy "fly-aways" I guess you would say. Currently I brush him a couple times a week with a slicker brush (I'm in the process of trying to find a good brush to remove undercoat, as he hated any time I brushed him with a furminator). I want to start learning how to keep his coat looking nice and groomed on my own, especially on his rump and behind his legs, as his fur there is extra thick and gets matted easily. Getting brushed is also not his favorite, although he will tolerate the slicker brush. So I imagine trying to trim areas or remove mats will get challenging if he's wiggling around. I would love any tips or advice or products you like that help keep your dog groomed well! :) Or any tips from owners with particularly fussy dogs who don't like being groomed! :ponder:

Btw he has two types of fur texture, along his sides and belly it is very soft and less thick, while all down his back and across his shoulders and neck is more wiry and very thick and long. Not sure if that makes a difference as far as what tools are best?
 

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It sounds and looks (going off of your picture of him) like your guy has a simaler coat to my aussies. What I normally use is a undercoat rake to get most of the hair out, then on their pants and chest I brush them out with cushion pin brush (It looks very similar to the brushes we use for our hair) in combination with a detangler for his pants if I need it. If he has any feathering you can use a comb made for dogs, or just use the undercoat rake. I also have a bristle brush which I don't use to often but if I'm just doing a quick brush its nice to have or I just use it to get some of the undercoat up. I also just got a slicker brush, but it doesn't get to much hair up on my guys and I since I don't want to irritate their skin I don't use it much, but I usually use it simallerly to the bristle brush.
For scissors I use a small pair of rounded end trimming shears, which I use for getting rid of mats, trimming feathering, trimming the hawks and their pants. I also have a pair of thining shears which are nice to have but not neccisary.
A note on mats, as Dawnben said, if the mats are big or really close to the skin I would shave them off. For small ones away from the skin I to as I said I use the trimming scissors.
There are some great youtube videos you can look up to see how to trim and groom dogs with similar coat types to yours.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
He is a mix, the rescue he came from guessed some aussi and border collie, but it's all just guessing. We don't know exactly for sure what breeds he is. He's sure cute tho! ;)
 

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To brush my Aussie (and also my BC, although she's practically a smoothie):

1. Pin Brush - It looks like a hairbrush for people. I do this to get any tangles out and it also helps me discover any mats. Also gets some hair out, which is a bonus. I also brush the heck out of his "pants".

2. Undercoat Rake - get all the old hair out. I do this along his whole body, but most of the undercoat comes from his thighs/haunches. I could spend hours just doing the rake, honestly.

3. Slicker Brush - Gets any loose hair off the top of his coat, and makes him look kinda shiny and fabulous.

4. Metal Comb - I use the comb on his ears, and feathers on his front legs. His ears are where the mats tend to show up, so if they are small, I work on them a little with the comb. If they are large/very close to his skin, I cut them out with scissors.

5. Thinning shears - I take these and thin out his pants, sometimes his ear hair if he's been getting lots of mats, but not often.

6. Straight Scissors - I trim the top of his feet, the undersides of his pads, and then cut away hair/left over poop (ahhh the joys of owning an Aussie) around his butt.

7. Clean his ears, dremmel his nails, and a quick spritz with some dog cologne.
 

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I just got this grooming tool from Amazon and boy oh boy. We have a Husky and 2 cats so of course there is hair EVERYWHERE in our house! I wish we had found this comb sooner. I cannot BELIEVE how much hair it removes as it was better and more effective than FURminator.
Furry Supplies Grooming Tool
 

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Some tips just from experience:

I have a variety of tools/brushes and two different electric trimmers (one of my dogs is a poodle). It seems that their grooming needs and the brushes I use vary with the time of year. One tip is to keep everything together in one area, and to take the time to keep your grooming stuff clean.

I also use dog cologne sometimes on the dogs(I saved $ by getting a gallon in a plastic container and then pouring it into one of those plastic spray bottles which I labelled 'eau de dog').

Make it fun with treats and attention. I put a chair out on the deck and get a brush and the dogs all rush over. If you can, try to do a basic brushing daily, you will be amazed how much better your house looks when the hair is on the deck and not on the living room floor.
Don't wear your good clothes, it seems like the hair clings to my jeans and t shirt which I don't mind, but if I was wearing something that needed dry cleaning I'd change first.
 
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