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@Sunflower_, it depends on the dog, some BC's will drive you nuts, my neighbors have one and I promise you Milo does not have an off stitch. His "job" is too play ball and he will do that nonstop to the point where he cannot walk the next day. My five are perfectly happy to lounge around the yard all day and do nothing. Admittedly they are all older now, the youngest one is eight and they spend their younger years on a farm with lots of space to run and play.
But most of all, the op had indicated that she is willing to do what it takes to keep a BC mentally and physically occupied. And that is the most important trait and dog owner can have.
That being said, I would be very careful of bringing any breeding breed into a family with smaller kids, I know mine see kids as sheep without wool - to te herded into a corner and made so stand still, and they will not hesitate to use teeth to achieve that goal. Something most kids don't appreciate.
My previous border was super happy as a family companion with lots on and off leash walks and lots of mental stimulation. My current border cross is just the same. I am surrounded by border owners who have very happy well adjusted dogs that do not herd.
 

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Of course we do more than play fetch, or tug-of-war! We have them do their tricks maybe 2 times a day with treats, but also practice them without treats and instead with play as a reward. We do hide treats nearby to let them search for them too.
This is still a quite limited amount of mental stimulation. Training some basic commands each day doesn’t usually challenge the dog per say. Of course this depends on what level you train and what ambitions you got. I’m still suggesting you to look into some of the activities I previously mentioned and considering practice some of them instead of 2 hours of fetch. Since you already got two dogs you have the advantage to try them out and see what you think is fun!
As for spaniels or retrievers, we do have a lab-mix, and love her dearly. However, we're not too interested in getting another. Don't get me wrong though! They're great dogs, but it's not a breed we're looking to get another of.
Why is that? What is it about your lab-mix you particularly don’t like or feel like’s missing?

Regarding the high maintenance of the spaniels I see your point but at the same time I don’t have the same experience as you. They are dogs that need grooming from time to time and maybe the cocker spaniel demands a bit more than the welsh and english springer spaniel for instance. Previously I owned an English springer spaniel and he didn’t demand that much of grooming. His feathering was cut short so he didn’t need the amount of grooming as he would if kept according to the breed standard. Then his paws and ears was regularly cut too, but if I remember correctly he needed to be cut down once a month and apart from that he didn’t really need much grooming and that was manageable for me as an 11year old (nothing I recommend, it wasn’t pretty..). They do demand some special attention in keeping their ears clean but I don’t experience that as being so time consuming however. And if you look at the Welsh they got even shorter ears than the English while the cocker spaniel usually got much longer.

But of course, if you don’t feel like you’ll be able to manage their grooming requirements you shouldn’t get one of these breeds, but maybe it would be worth considering.

The golden and lab have pretty low maintenance (especially the lab) but I’m curious to find out what you’re missing from these breeds.
 

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@Sunflower_, it depends on the dog, some BC's will drive you nuts, my neighbors have one and I promise you Milo does not have an off stitch. His "job" is too play ball and he will do that nonstop to the point where he cannot walk the next day. My five are perfectly happy to lounge around the yard all day and do nothing. Admittedly they are all older now, the youngest one is eight and they spend their younger years on a farm with lots of space to run and play.
But most of all, the op had indicated that she is willing to do what it takes to keep a BC mentally and physically occupied. And that is the most important trait and dog owner can have.
That being said, I would be very careful of bringing any breeding breed into a family with smaller kids, I know mine see kids as sheep without wool - to te herded into a corner and made so stand still, and they will not hesitate to use teeth to achieve that goal. Something most kids don't appreciate.
And the most common scenario would be to get a dog like Milo. Honestly I feel really bad from reading that. The dog obviously needs some more challenging activities, not spending his days with just the stressful activity of chasing a ball, which doesn’t offer him the correct stimulation. It’s very likely that he also suffer from obsessive behavior due to under stimulation. Why suggest the breed if you know that some Border Collies wouldn’t be happy or satisfied living like that?

I can’t speak about your dogs but as you mentioned they’re older so they don’t have the same energy and need to work as a younger dog. However it sounds like they could have some issues with the herding instincts since they herd children. A common sign and issue with a border collie which lacks the possibility to herd or other suitable activities is that they start herding things they shouldn’t (kids, cars, bicycles etc).

But most of all, the op had indicated that she is willing to do what it takes to keep a BC mentally and physically occupied. And that is the most important trait and dog owner can have.
I wouldn’t say that’s he most important trait. The most important thing is that you can assure yourself and the dog that you’ll be able to offer the right life. It’s not a good idea to get a dog with the plan to adapt according to the dogs needs. Mostly because it’s very rarely works out. And no offense to Op but it doesn’t sound like they would be able to fulfill the needs of a border collie and to each and every day provide hours of challenging activities that will allow the dog to be the working dog it’s bred to be.

My previous border was super happy as a family companion with lots on and off leash walks and lots of mental stimulation. My current border cross is just the same. I am surrounded by border owners who have very happy well adjusted dogs that do not herd.
I can’t speak for your dogs but I’ll let the information I previously posted speak for itself. And by Op’s description I don’t see that they would be able to offer a lot of walks and mental stimulation (which it sounds like you’re suggesting).
 

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Before getting a breed, I suggust reading up on it. Their are many factors that come into play. Like the children you mentioned, how active you'll be with your dog, etc. Some dogs do better with large family's. And, other are content on being a home body.
 
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