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I am new to this forum. We have the sweetest miniature schnauzer her nane is Abby, she is a loveable and very silly dog. Abby is 5 years old. We really don't have to many complaints with her with exception if one behavior. When we put her out to potty she usually does her business pretty darn quick and comes right back to the door. For some reason when 22 yr old daughter lets her outside to potty she stays at the door, barking non stop, she only does this when daughter lets her out. She doesn't leave the door at all. No one will let her in as long as she is barking incessantly, no attention at all when she is barking at door, once she quiets down she is let back in,uf she starts barking again before we open door we turn around from door and leave, eventually she quiets down long enough to let back in. Like I said before she only does with our daughter. Any ideas how to remedy this.
 

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So your daughter opens the door to let Abby out, Abby goes out and your daughter shuts the door, and Abby doesn't toilet but stays outside the door barking? Is that right?
 

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I would try a couple of thing:

1) Your daughter goes out intothe garden, waits for Abby to toilet, rewards and praises her, and brings her back in again. or...

2) The moment Abby barks to come back in, your daughter lets her in again. If she asks to go out straight away because she still needs to toilet, your daugher repeats the above. Eventually, Abby will be desperate enough that she will go and do what a dog has to do (assuming toilet training is well established).

Only letting her back in when she stops barking won't be helpful - she has, as she sees it, a need (to be let in), and she needs to rely on her owners to fulfil her needs. In fact she may be more likely to start barking straight away as she's anxious about being left out and not let back in again when she asks.

Either of these approaches might only need to be done for a while to 'fix' the problem, but if not, having to go out with her when she toilets shouldn't be too much of a pain.

Why she does this I don't know - did your daughter used to go out and play with Abby in the garden and could Abby be hoping for a game? But sometimes we can't find a reason for a quirky behaviour and just accept that that's the way it is.
 

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I'm going to put this long comment for all owners who experienced the same problem or related to barking:

Barking is a natural behavior for dogs. But when the barking becomes incessant, this typically signals that something is wrong and needs to be corrected, either in the dog's development of a bad habit or in the environment that is contributing to the barking (this is the cause, since she want someone to open the door, so by barking she's calling someone's attention).

Your daughter might need to go with Abby while she poops or leaving the door open (if it's safe) and close it when she's already in.

Hopefully, this will work. But in any case, there's another reason why she's barking you don't want to stop dog barking altogether, as this can be an important way for them to alert you to danger or discomfort. More important is teaching them to stop when they are told to stop. As with all dog training, good communication, consistency, and rewarding the desired behavior, while reprimanding the bad, is key.

Similar to other problem behaviors in dogs, excessive barking can be the result of boredom, stress, loneliness, and a need for attention. Do you take your dog for regular walks? Is he alone all day? The lack of regular exercise and socialization can lead to excessive barking. It is, therefore, necessary to take your dog for at least two walks a day, and give her mental stimulation, as well: puzzle games, daily training, and toys.

If you have examined the causes of behavior but still need assistance on how to stop a dog barking, there are a number of products available that specifically stop dog barking. You might consider a citronella collar, which releases a bitter scent that dogs dislike and forces them to be quiet. Similarly, you can get a sound collar that emits a loud noise whenever the dog barks.

Finally, learn the QUIET command that I found, as taught below:

1. First, get your dog to start barking by leaving her outside (in your case). Your doorbell is a good initiator. So, standing in the doorway, ring the doorbell and allow your dog to bark a few times.


2. Hold a treat over the dog's nose while saying "QUIET," "HUSH," or the like. It doesn't matter what word you use, but it DOES matter that, whatever word you use, you only use that one.


3. When your dog stops barking to sniff, praise her and give her the treat. Repeat, each time requiring the dog to be silent for long periods before he receives the treat.

I also found books ( one ebook) and CDs that might help pet-owners out there, It's from Dan Stevens who is a professional dog trainer. It will teach you the tricks to solve your pet's behavioral problems like excessive barking, chewing things, and digging. Remember thou, you need to be patient because you will do it step-by-step or every day like I did with "Chiko", it's 5 minute-ish daily and it took me and my brother ten days for him to stop pooing indoor but it's worth it.

You can check the product on Secrets to Dog Training
(https://18b8721az6miny9djmvfcn4z7a.hop.clickbank.net/)
 
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