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I was just talking with my sister today about something that I've considered before. Horses are generally bought trained for owner purposes, or bought untrained, trained, and sold. Why on earth hasn't that ever caught on for dogs? The average person doesn't exactly do a good job training a dog themselves! 🤣
 

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I was just talking with my sister today about something that I've considered before. Horses are generally bought trained for owner purposes, or bought untrained, trained, and sold. Why on earth hasn't that ever caught on for dogs? The average person doesn't exactly do a good job training a dog themselves! 🤣
Many want puppies, and puppies don’t come ready trained. Something those prospective dog owners who want a puppy often tend to forget.

Of course, by “prospective”, I’m talking about those who see a well trained dog on the street, or a celebrity with the latest fashion breed/designer cross, and don’t realise that it’s taken months or years of training to get the dog they saw on the street or with the latest celebrity to where it is now.
 

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There are breeders that sell trained dogs. Many breeders will start house training prior to puppies going home. London was raised with puppy culture by my friend who bred her litter. She never had an accident in the house when I brought her home. It is very time consuming but well worth it. I helped her when I could with the litter. Here is a demo of barrier training which is part of the culture training. Puppy culture barrier training. - Bing video
 

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Your post first made me think - people don't do that because they want to raise the puppy and establish an incredible bond from a young age. Then I thought, if we consider this for dogs, then why we don't do this with kids?! 😂

Bird hunting dogs are often purchased at 2 years of age, after they're fully trained. My dad bought two dogs that way. They did take a little while to adjust to life in a new home but after a few months they were fully part of the family.
 

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Pretty much whatever one else said,.plus imoulse control and money I think. People don't always necessarily want to to wait for that trained dog, which is also fairly often more expensive. Though impulse often triumphs.

Of course, by “prospective”, I’m talking about those who see a well trained dog on the street, or a celebrity with the latest fashion breed/designer cross, and don’t realise that it’s taken months or years of training to get the dog they saw on the street or with the latest celebrity to where it is now
Or that moment! :LOL: I was thinking about that ^ the other day on our walk. First passerby saw Pup at a sit and studiously ignoring a baby squirrel stopped in the middle of the sidewalk. The next set saw her hopping up.and down barking at it in the tree.
 

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Some people do sell or rehome trained dogs, but it's mostly breeders of purebreds who have an older dog returned or who have a dog they kept and showed, maybe bred and who can't keep every generation of show/breeding dogs. There are groups who train dogs for specific purposes like service dogs who sell them, but you're talking very expensive because the training is very extensive.

When I did Rottweiler rescue I occasionally took in dogs with some training, housebroken, decent on a leash, and of course "sit.":)
 

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People may not buy or sell trained dogs because of the many benefits that come with owning one. Owning a dog can provide companionship, exercise, and security for people of all ages. Dogs are also known to reduce stress and anxiety levels, as well as promote better mental health overall. Trained dogs can provide even more benefits to their owners, such as increased safety and security.
 

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I think one reason is that training a horse is considerably more dangerous than training a dog. You have to work pretty hard to get yourself killed or even seriously injured while training a puppy. In contrast, it's very easy to get badly injured by a horse. One of my horse friends is currently nursing a broken foot (got stepped on,) and another is nursing broken ribs (got run over by a frightened horse when a neighbor set off fireworks while she was in the middle of evening feed.)
 

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The bond between a horse and their owner is just as strong or stronger than between dogs and their owners.
I've also had extremely strong bonds with various cats over the years. And I've lived and had amazing dogs that I've been very strongly bonded with as well.
You can't compare the bonds people have with each animal. It's like asking people to choose between their kids.
 
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