Dog Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
986 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Im asking this question purely just out of curiosity. I wont be replying to replies on this topic but would love to read what others think.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
388 Posts
Nobody. Calm down, take some deep breaths, were all on your side! Let us help...that's why we have these forums.

Sure, at times people may come off as opinionated or pushy, but the vast majority of even those posts are intended to be helpful!

Tomorrow's a new day, enjoy it for all it's worth!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
388 Posts
Something else I want to mention, about autism and the spectrum it entails. I am not an expert, nor have I been trained in this area, so these are solely my observations.

Background, on the street I grew up up there were multiple group homes for people with disabilities.

I went to a grade school that had a section for disabled kids.

We all played on the same playground. Deaf or blind or fully functional, all together, same space.

My mother and father were very adamant about how to treat disabled people with respect, but when you're a kid playing with deaf and blind kids, you see some of the best in people, and unfortunately some of the worst.

It was exhilarating in so many ways, but so freaking frustrating in others.

As a young kid, I got to know a guy with cerable palsy who rode down our street on a three wheeled bike. Dude couldn't talk well, but he wanted to. So we let him!

Name was Arnold, and he was a great man! He taped screws for the Salvation Army, and it meant everything to him!

When he told me, we were still in that I'm learning your dialect stage, so he had to repeat it until I got (previously, I didn't realise that taping screws could be a job handled by people, but it was his motivation, and it suited his abilities, so THANK GOD FOR THE PEOPLE THAT HELPED TO DEVELOP THAT KIND OF JOB!). And that brings tears to my eyes!

I did and do love Arnold. He did good, I always enjoyed his company, and I met him first when I was riding - well - it was a tricycle, but a proper John Deer tractor tricycle!

Anyway, there, I've.shared a bit from my childhood that shaped me. I hope it helps ... it sure helped me! I really hope it helps you feel better too!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
It depends.

I'm on the spectrum too. I'm having a hard time discerning whether you mostly just need support and encouragement, or are you genuinely curious - you know, literal thinking... But since you asked, I'll be blunt: you can have a difficult dog and ASD (if that is the reason for your question), but I think that in that case you need to be taking extra, extra good care of yourself.

From your perspective, is having a dog mostly rewarding? Do positive experiences outweigh stressful experiences for both of you? If so, I don't see why you wouldn't have a dog.

Remember that most dog owners get frustrated at times, and coping with occasional stress is natural for both humans and dogs. Chronic, ongoing stress would not be good for either of our species. So is your relationship mostly mostly beneficial or mostly stressful?

Personally, I don't see why being on the spectrum would disqualify me from having a dog. I'm a pretty decent owner, with a few blunders here and there. However, for me personally and for most of us on the autism spectrum, it is important to find the right dog. I'd be cautious about taking on a 'project dog', as there are certain special needs that would be difficult for me to accomodate, like a lot of barking etc. Also, as I said: if I take on the responsibility for the wellbeing of another living being, I'm then also responsible for taking very good care of myself - manage my stress levels, self soothe, check my disaster-thinking etc. I need to take good care of myself if I want to take good care of my animals. Fair or not, if you are on the spectrum, you might need to be even more mindful of these things than the average person, that's just our reality.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,805 Posts
I don't know why you are even asking that question. I personally have not seen anything on the forum that indicates anyone here thinks you shouldn't own a dog, and I read pretty much every post.

I think the advice above from DogRun but taking care of yourself and so on is good. But at the same time, all of those things really apply to everyone because we all have our problems.
Some of us have physical problems and others have different kinds of mental or emotional problems like depression or anxiety or whatever.

I also keep in mind that the people who have Service Dogs all have some sort of serious problem, physical or emotional/mental, or they wouldn't need a service dog!
So for anyone to say or think that a person with a physical or mental health problem, or with a different way of experiencing life (such as being on the autism spectrum) shouldn't have a dog is absurd.

It all comes down to what an individual can handle on all levels in terms of managing and training and taking good care of a dog, and that applies to everyone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
986 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yesterdays comment on walk got 2 me 2 much which brought my depression to surface which led to my stupid question
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top