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Rough or smooth coat? I have a smoothie, and use the zoom groom rubber curry to loosen up and dead hairs, then finish with the slicker brush.
 

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My Aussie has a very long double coat but similar to Border Collie.

I use both of what you showed...different brands. Plus a very coarse single row comb with loose or rotating teeth. Mostly I use the brush. I go over her everyday several times. It's amazing how much fur comes off.

The hardest part is dealing with cockleburs and other stickies. I constantly pick at them.

The fine slicker works during shedding season but get plugged very quickly.
 

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Furminator is what I use on our collie.
I would caution against the FURminator, I work in a grooming salon and while we absolutely LOVE the shampoo/conditioner (mostly the conditioner, any shampoo would work just as well) especially combined with a HV dryer it works wonders! But we've found that the FURminator brush tends to hurt dogs if used for any amount of time because of the sharp teeth which irritates the skin, it also cuts the hair instead of taking out the undercoat and we don't use them anymore for that reason. I always suggest to people a zoom groom or an undercoat rake depending on what type of coat their dog has.
 

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Our well qualified groomer suggested it.
Hope it works for you then. I'd still caution against it and would only use it for short periods of time and keep an eye on the skin for irritation.
 

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I use a slicker (the metal one), a rake, and a greyhound comb on my aussie. I also have a Mars Coat King that helps strip out the coat but you don't have to worry about it hurting them like Doppelganger spoke about.

I usually will start with the Coat king to strip out the areas that he has excess growth (his pants and his chest mostly) then I will rake out his whole body and finish with the slicker. I use the greyhound comb for where he has finer soft hair like around his ears and where he can sometimes get matted like where his collar sits.
 
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@jclark343 mentioned something I totally forgot about! Make sure to use a comb after whatever brush you use. I can't tell you how many times we have dogs come in that are matted and the owner brushes them everyday, but without a comb you are missing an entire layer of hair.
 

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@jclark343 mentioned something I totally forgot about! Make sure to use a comb after whatever brush you use. I can't tell you how many times we have dogs come in that are matted and the owner brushes them everyday, but without a comb you are missing an entire layer of hair.
Thanks for that tip. I have a border-collie-ish dog. So I am reading.

I use a pin brush for his body, he loves it (I love pin-brushes for my head too--they feel good).

I have a wide tooth comb for his fringes (tail, pants, etc.)

I have shedding comb/rake for shedding season, long fixed round pins, pulls out loose undercoat while gliding through guard hairs.

A bristle brush puts an amazing shine on the top coat.

I use Absorbine Show-sheen Gel on pants & tail so the brush glides through without snagging him (this is for his comfort, and I use the stuff on me too). Cowboy Magic does the same thing-these are leave-in conditions, very slick.

If I was having trouble keeping up with grooming (ie, snags & dreadlocks) I would thin his fringes with thinning scissors (it's a notched scissor that hairdressers use).

My guy has a practical coat, so haven't done that thus far.
 
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