Dog Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i've been looking at dogs to get (or to beg my parents to get really) and i'm stuck between a labrador or an alaskan huskey. i'll describe our family life, i have an older sister who is moving to college next year, a younger brother that is 5 and kinda rough with our current pets. we have a 11-13 year old shih tzu, two cats, and four ducks. the ducks live outside, but the dog would have to get along with them. we live right next to a pond. i live in ct so it can get pretty cold and pretty hot. we have a large house and a large yard. we don't have that much money-we have enough, but we can't spend too much on the dog. the labs i am looking at are $500 (cheapest i could find near by) and the huskies are also $500 (also the cheapest i could find near by).
i just need opinions on which breed would be better. thanks so much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
My best friend had a lab, and it was a terror not mean just overly hyper and wild very hard to train, Kobe was one of those dogs that weight a ton but thought he weight about 8lbs!! They had to give him away due to his crazy behavior and was constantly barking and waking up their baby. All dogs will get along with anything as long as they are raised with the, ours get along great with the cats we have, they even get along with others' cats that they have never met because they dont see the diff between them, esp my shihtzu/chihuahua mix. He just sees them as more friends. I would go with an alaskan huskey they are also just as big but easier to handle, and train. They are a working breed of dog and enjoy pleasing their owners as far as I have seen. But their maintenence is much more than a lab, they tend to have more hair problems, like matting and shedding and have to have a particular grooming because they cannot be shaved. Just make sure that the dog you chose is going to fit in with your family if owning a more hyper dog is fine then the lab is fine, but if behavior is a problem I suggest the huskey.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
111 Posts
Then Try Looking into the Flat Coated Retriever. Better fit for most homes.... considered mellow and relatively inactive when indoors and active when outdoors.

They come in Black, Liver (brown), and if you search around....Yellow (Golden).

They are not overbred and do not suffer from the many health disorders found in Labs or Goldens.

And they shed far less than Labs, Goldens and especially Huskies.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Hey Tami,

No matter which breed you choose, as puppies the will be excitable and rambunctious, they will all require proper training and will grow to a larger size that without proper training can be a handful no matter what breed you pick.

The suggestions provide by the others here are great but make sure you pick the breed that you love..if you settle because of simplicity than you may do the dog an injustice by not giving it the attention, home and love it needs.

I don't want this to come out harsh but I have seen this happen before.

Good luck
Adrian
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
if i was able to get a dog, i would spend every possible second with it. i'm working so hard for this dog, that i would never grow tired of it or not love it. of course, i will not spoil it so that it thinks it can do whatever it wants, i will set boundaries and make sure the dog follows them.
i'm not even sure how i could put how i feel into words, it is almost impossible.
i'm going to continue to research breeds to make sure i pick the correct one that would fit into our family like a missing puzzle piece.
thanks so much for all the help everyone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
That's excellent to hear Tami,

Keep us posted on what you decided and when you get the new family member.

It sounds like it is going to get a great home with lots of love and attention.

Adrian
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Okay, I would go with husky, just because Labs and ducks don't exactly mix. Also, labs can get pretty hyper and unless you're willing to spend a lot of time with them will find other ways to use their energy (destroying things). I'm definately not saying that all labs are like this but many I've know are. Huskys are also dogs with a lot of energy but I've never known one to destroy anything. But you'll have to get them shaved alot and spend alot more time on grooming where you are.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Well, many dogs have many different traits that make them special. For example, a golden retriever is fun and spunky, while a poodle is usually quiet and lazy. It really depends on what type of dog you want. But, since your parents aren't sure about you getting a dog, you might want to get together with them and discuss wht type of breed is right for your family.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
303 Posts
Hi Tami! I completely agree with Adrian and also Chatham has a good suggestion with the flat coated retiever....or a golden.
I want to put in my two cents and I don't mean to offend anyone who had posted, but a Husky will go after your ducks. They have a high prey drive and are known for killing livestock. A husky will also be ok with the cats it is raised with, but not with a neighbors cat.
Lab are actually fine with ducks. Sam my husbands lab was a duck hunging dog, but at home with the ducks and chickens he was fine. Completely ignored them.
Again, I don't want to offend those who posted, but I had to clearify a Husky with livestock. Now, that is not to say that there are a few huskies out there that are just fine with livestock, but, that is not the norm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
^^^ Agreed. And someone said they've never known a husky to be destructive??? Ok, my experience is with Siberians and Malamutes, not Alaskan Huskies, but... They're VERY known to be destructive! :)

Make sure you do lots and lots of research before picking a breed. And don't go with dog X because he's the cheapest. Find a breeder that is a REPUTIBLE breeder, tests their dogs, ect. If you can't afford a dog from a good breeder, go through a rescue or humane society. JMHO :)

Jessi
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
111 Posts
^^^ Agreed. And someone said they've never known a husky to be destructive??? Ok, my experience is with Siberians and Malamutes, not Alaskan Huskies, but... They're VERY known to be destructive! :)

Make sure you do lots and lots of research before picking a breed. And don't go with dog X because he's the cheapest. Find a breeder that is a REPUTIBLE breeder, tests their dogs, ect. If you can't afford a dog from a good breeder, go through a rescue or humane society. JMHO :)

Jessi
Just to bring up a point about testing the parent dogs....... unfortunately due to breeding practices over many generations in pure bred lines its no guarantee to just test the parent dogs for many of the genetic defects that plague all breeds and even mix-breeds. There is no way to say with any certainty that testing the parent dogs to be clear of eye, hip and knees for any genetic defects or even for cancer will guarantee that the offspring will not become afflicted with the many disorders. It is more of a formality to tell the prospective buyer that the parents don't have any signs of them at the point of testing. But that also doesn't mean the parents won't get them later in life. But the benefit of knowing the parents is that you yourself can trace back the lineage of the dogs on the registry's pedigree finder and learn for yourself what the history of the puppy's line is going back several generations. Again not a clear gauge on cause of death but then the breed clubs themselves keep records of this in most cases. It is quite a bit of homework and research, but also an advantage over a rescue where you're taking a complete gamble on what that history may be. And knowing the breeders gives you the opportunity to visit the kennel and meet the dogs and the offspring from several generations and also to ask questions in person to the breeders themselves. To witness the temperament of the actual parents and to witness firsthand what methods of socialization the breeder is taking to ensure you have a really good well rounded little pup before you take it home.

And just a point about cats..... If you do have cats all I can say is even the best of socialized pups quickly learns to become an aggressive biter when sharing a household with a cat. Cats typically will paw or scratch whereas a puppy will use its mouth and teeth to reciprocate and that quickly becomes a first response to anyone just reaching a hand out. I don't hate cats, but I definitely at this point will seriously consider not selling any of my pups to a household with a single cat.... completely forget about several cat households. Long term its better for the puppy and the cat owner.

Although I will admit that Its possible for a very confident cat to accept the new puppy, But then that also means the owner needs to have a really pampered kitty there. Outdoor type cats that come indoors once in a while are definitely a problem. They are instinctive predators and kill many times more indigenous creatures than any of the indigenous predators do. So the odds that those kitties will pick up something nasty on there claws or teeth that can transfer inter-species and seriously harm or kill a new puppy is very high.

For TamiReyLena, seriously consider settling for just the cats. I see a long road of disappointment ahead of you otherwise. Or find a really old and settled dog that isn't spooked by much.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
111 Posts
You are by far a much better pack leader than most or are blessed with the time and patience required to keep such a household. I'm not saying it can't be done, but for a novice dog owner I won't risk my pups in that situation. You have an established household and pecking order, that alone is half the battle. In the rest of the world we can't assume it will be like yours since the amount of dogs to the amount of cats should also maintain the peace in your home, why would a cat risk striking a dog that would lash out and cause the rest of the pack to maul it, hence since animals are not stupid there is some level of peace in your home. This individual needs to be aware that it is a lot of work and that there are consequences to not considering all the contingencies just in case something goes very wrong. And your suggestions if not allowing for these considerations can have a person moving confidently in the direction of a bad situation.

I can say with certainty based off of real world experience that the odds are likely the pup will develop into a biter if the cats are not controlled or if they are dominant. Unless you want to call my clients and personally tell them they should be experiencing a situation similar to you because all animals are wired the same as yours????
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
I wouldn't get a Huskie while having small kids who are ruff with pets in the house. They are typically harder to train and not very submissive and having a dog that is submissive is a must in a house with little kids.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Hi there,
I agree that a Labrador and ducks might not mix, and also have a friend who runs a dogwashing business, who says that adolescent Labradors are some of his hardest customers! In general, once grown up, I find them to be lovely dogs, but in your instance I would suggest maybe going for the Husky, or a Golden Retriever.
Remember, too, that all 3 or 4 puppy immunisations will also cost if you get a young one.
All the best whichever breed you choose.
Cheers Jewels
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
I'd go with the lab. They are good all around family dogs. Any young dog is likely to chase ducks. They are going to go over and try to investigate the ducks are going to take off and the pup will follow. Just be sure to introduce any dog to them while on leash till they get used to seeing the ducks around, after awhile they will just ignore them. As far as a cane corso, pit bull or any of those type dogs wait till you've got a little more experience under your belt. They are great dogs but they are large and powerful and most home owners insurance won't accept them. Heck, in some states they are illegal or require special permits. You want something you can have fun with, not worry about a lawsuit.
Check the pound though, they get full blooded dogs in all the time, even pups, and it would be a lot cheaper.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
If you want a calm dog, I would not suggest a labrador. The husky is very nice and friendly. If you do think about getting a labrador, be in mind that a hyper dog is hard to train.
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top