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Hello. I am an aspiring dog breeder and I will hopefully be able to begin breeding in three years when I move away from the city. I am having trouble finding any dogs that don't come with a spay/neuter contract. I need to find dogs that do not require those contracts so that I may use them to breed. Just to be clear, I am not a B.Y.B and I will not be starting a puppy mill. I will be obtaining a breeder's license soon. The dog we are considering the most is an Alaskan Malamute. I would appreciate it if I wasn't judged for being a breeder instead of adding to the people who don't want breeders to exist anymore. I am not going to be a mass producer of Mals and I won't be one of those people who abuse them or don't give them the care they need. Anyway, I would appreciate it if anyone had any useful information as to where I can find Alaskan Malamutes, or any other dog since we are not sure if Malamutes right for us, that do not require a spay/neuter contract but are healthy. Thanks c:

Also, sorry if this is the wrong place to post this, I'm new to the site and I haven't figured out navigation yet :p
 

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Seriously, I think you should own the type (breed) of dog you want to breed, before Ever becoming a breeder of them. Learn about their traits, and do a lot of research into pedigree lines so you are breeding the right kind of dog for that breed.

For example: Golden Retrievers. Most people think of just 'that' as a breed, but within the breed, there are two types. The American, or sporting type, and the English, or show-dog type. Plus there are the 'reds' and the 'creams' as far as coloring.

The American sport-dog type is taller, lankier, lighter weight, and often has a narrower head with a slight dome to it. The English show dog type, has a broader 'block head' look, is heavier, shorter legged, and usually a thicker heavier coat. Both kinds cn be real show dogs of course, but most often one sees the English type in the ring. Given all of this, a person going into the breeding them would probably need to narrow down what kind and what color they want to concentrate on...but also, I think, actually own one for a few years before ever consider breeding.

You say you want to breed Malamutes, but then say you are not sure if that is the kind of dog you want to breed. ??? It doesn't sound like you have a passion for a breed, that you actually have owned one and want to get involved in showing and improve the breed. So, yeah, that does make you a back yard breeder if that is how it goes.

I'm not totally against a decent back yard breeder. I have seen some golden retriever breeders who only bred their females every other year, and were honest about the dogs being pet quality only, but they also did all the vet checks on the parents and the puppies to try to breed dogs that were not prone to hip dysplasia, etc, and they were breeding English types to English types and American types to American types, so at least they had the basics down...and all three that I talked to and met, had a LOVE for the breed becaue they had owned them for most of their lives.

Please, don't just grab any breed of dog and start breeding it, because it happened to be the only breed you could get your hands on that didn't come with a spay/neuter clause.

If you are still bound to do this, the only thing I can say about your issue with breeders wanting a no breeding contract signed... is that no breeder wants competition in their area.

They are also aware of back yard breeders and they care enough about their puppies that they don't want to see (especially the females) turned into puppy factories, producing lower quality puppies that are being sold at lower prices, which could tempt a buyer of of one of their own puppies away from them.

Breeders who are willing to allow puppies to be bought and not spayed or neutered are usually back yard breeders...and the parents and puppies are probably not fully vetted.

You might be able to sign into some kind of contract with a real breeder who's interested in maintaining a high quality line, by agreeing to some kind of 'won't breed, unless it's to a dog the breeder approves of, and the breeder gets some claim to a puppy or two from your litters' I haven't looked into it a lot, but I have read that there are contracts out there like that.

But then, in this kind of situation, you are legally locked up in an agreement with a breeder for the rest of your dog's breeding life. Which actually, might not be a bad thing, if you are just learning and the experienced breeder can point you towards what is good or bad about certain pedigree lines and makes sure you stick to improving the breed over just breeding to anything and hoping all the puppies come out healthy and not having behavior issues due to bad breeding.

Stormy
 

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I suggest you really do your homework on Malamutes. What do you know about that breed? Do you know the health concerns within the breed? Do you have the money to test the dogs for genetic health concerns? Are you going to title the dogs, and do you have the money to do so? A good breeder is going to want to know all that before letting a puppy go to you under a breeding contract. A good breeder is not just going to give you a puppy and let you breed it without knowing that it's worthy to be bred.

Now if you simply want to breed Alaskan Malamute puppies without any thought to whether or not those dogs are great examples of the breed and are healthy and temperamentally sound then get on google, type in Alaskan Malamute puppies and take your pick. I assure you a backyard breeder near you most likely has a litter of ill bred, potentially neurotic, puppies available.

I am not going to be a mass producer of Mals


By the way, if you do contact a breeder of Alaskan Malamutes, you better not refer to the dog as Mals. Mals are Belgian Malinois. Like I said, learn as much about the breed you choose as possible, before you even think about breeding them if you are going to be a good breeder.
 

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I'm not a breeder, but I thought I'd give some advice I've read on this forum and other dog forums when someone mentions they want to breed. This is very basic and I'm going off of memory.

1. Go to dog shows, pay attention to the breed of your choice.

2. Talk to the breeders (in person at the dog show) who specialize in your breed. Some talking points would be: a) Pros and cons of the breed in general, and of showing b) What kind of care they require c) What kind of health/genetic testing they require

3. Ask a breeder you respect if they can mentor you or recommend someone who can mentor you. This person would be able to give advise, show you how to find a good quality dog, when is the right time to breed, etc...


I'm sure there's more, but that was all I could remember for the moment. If you are serious about being a breeder, it's going to take a lot work, time, money, and commitment. I wish you luck.
 

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Besides the very good advice and info you've received so far, I'd also like to add that if you're determined to become a reputable breeder instead of a back yard breeder, please make sure you have the time and resources to dedicate to socializing your puppies to a range of people before they're purchased. From what I've been reading, those first few months are so vital for a dog's healthy mental development.

Please also make sure that you're willing and able to include in the contract that buyers of your puppies sign a condition that you'll take the dog back at any time if they're not able to keep it for any reason, and perhaps a spay/neuter clause, too. That way you'll make sure that puppies and dogs that are the result of your breeding don't end up in shelters or rescues, nor will you run the risk that people will buy your puppies with the intention of breeding them irresponsibly.

I'm generally pro-rescue and adoption, but I don't have a problem with responsible breeders. It takes a lot more than many folks think to actually be a responsible breeder, though. There are far too many dogs, pure bred and otherwise, dying in pounds and living in limbo in rescues and foster homes without a permanent family. All you have to do is a breed specific search on perfinder or a search for breed specific rescues to see the evidence of irresponsible breeding.

Please do your research (and lots of it!) so that you can become one of the good guys: a responsible breeder who is willing to put the time, effort and money into breeding the right way for the right reasons. :thumbsup:

The stickies in the New Additions forum here are a good place to start:

http://www.dogforum.com/new-additions/note-about-reputable-breeders-pet-population-88242/

http://www.dogforum.com/new-additions/bybs-puppymills-petstores-reputable-breeders-88226/
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I would appreciate it if everyone would please stop posting that I need to do my homework on Malamutes. I have researched Malamutes and I know everything about them. I don't mean to sound rude, but it's taking up the thread posts and I would rather this stay focused on the topic of this thread rather than my level of knowledge. I wouldn't have thought about a breed like a malamute unless I knew about them. I know this sounds a little defensive but it's really not a matter of that, I would just like this to stay on track. I appreciate people who are concerned about that but don't worry, I have dealt with Mals on multiple occasions. I know Mal usually refers to a Belgian Malinois but when we all know what I am talking about then I will refer to it as a Mal, Mally or whatever :) Yes, I know that having huge fonts and these colors looks unprofessional annoys some people, but I like to have big bright things and it's easier to distinguish my posts from other people.
 

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Get into the breed first. Go to shows. Join a club and be active in it. Build a relationship with reputable breeders and handlers. Doing so will help you get a quality malamute from a reputable breeder even if you do not have breeding rights. Acitvely work with and show that dog. Continue to build relationships with the breeder you got your dog from as well as others. Then start discussing your interest in breeding and wanting a mentorship.
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Build a working relationship with people within the breed. In a lot of breeds it's hard to impossible to find breeders willing to send out puppies on contracts that allow for breeding. Building a working relationship with breeders within the breed not only gives you access to mentors but also gives you access to many generations of breeding stock.

Also, choose what venue you plan to title/work your dogs in. I know of few to no GOOD breeders willing to let dogs go out on breeding contracts without the new owner planning to prove that dog in some way. Usually, this is in conformation or in some sport similar to what the dog was bred originally to do. Most often, whatever the breeder does with their own dogs is what will be important that the breeding homes do with theirs.
 

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...
you will certainly have to "get into" the breed & form some connections w/ the people/breeders of that niche.
even still, if you can eventually manage to find a breeder willing to condone you breeding one of their puppies yourself, I'd certainly imagine any reputable breeder would only allow you to co-own said dog w/ them, for obvious reasons.
 

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Where are you located? I can look up some upcoming shows for you and help guide you in the right direction. I you're serious about becoming a quality reputable then you need to start with the best quality breeding stock that you can find, this means you'll need to get your dogs from breeders who are actively involved with the breed community. The national breed club usually has a state by state listing of breeders that are members in good standing with the breed club or they have contact info for the breeder referral liaison. Dog shows are great for meeting local-ish people who are involved with the breed and can give you a reference to their breeders if they aren't breeders themselves; it's also a great place to get hands on with the breed and see the quality of their dogs in person (photographs and websites can be very deceiving). Are you planning on doing anything with your Malamutes besides breeding them? I can look up the upcoming events in your area and try to direct you to like minded individuals. If you're more comfortable continuing the conversation in private you can pm me. But just as an FYI you'll need to develop a thick skin if you're going to be involved with anything in the purebred dog world, even just owning a purebred can be a faux paux with certain people. You wouldn't believe the crazy opinions people have tried to push onto me once they find out that I have show dogs and am involved in the breeding world.
 

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Many of the posters here have dogs from breeders so we're not "against breeders". We are against uniformed breeding.


Why do you want to start breeding?
 

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Why do you want to breed? What is your vision for the breed? What are you hoping to improve upon?

Have you ever owned a Malamute? I can tell you that if I was breeding dogs and you came to me and asked for a dog so you could breed them, I would be more than a little put off.

I agree with animalcracker - the world of conformation/breeding is like swimming in shark-infested water, you're going to need to develop a much thicker skin.
 
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Look at it from the standpoint of someone who's breeding and showing dogs. They've been working to improve the breed and develop a line of dogs that are healthy and show well, and you want to take the results of their work and compete against them.

You would be best off by starting with a malamute club or rescue, meet some breeders and develop a relationship with one or more of them, and inquire about co-owning a dog.
 

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Hello. I am an aspiring dog breeder and I will hopefully be able to begin breeding in three years when I move away from the city. I am having trouble finding any dogs that don't come with a spay/neuter contract. I need to find dogs that do not require those contracts so that I may use them to breed. Just to be clear, I am not a B.Y.B and I will not be starting a puppy mill. I will be obtaining a breeder's license soon. The dog we are considering the most is an Alaskan Malamute. I would appreciate it if I wasn't judged for being a breeder instead of adding to the people who don't want breeders to exist anymore. I am not going to be a mass producer of Mals and I won't be one of those people who abuse them or don't give them the care they need. Anyway, I would appreciate it if anyone had any useful information as to where I can find Alaskan Malamutes, or any other dog since we are not sure if Malamutes right for us, that do not require a spay/neuter contract but are healthy. Thanks c:

Also, sorry if this is the wrong place to post this, I'm new to the site and I haven't figured out navigation yet :p
I would appreciate it if everyone would please stop posting that I need to do my homework on Malamutes. I have researched Malamutes and I know everything about them. I don't mean to sound rude, but it's taking up the thread posts and I would rather this stay focused on the topic of this thread rather than my level of knowledge. I wouldn't have thought about a breed like a malamute unless I knew about them. I know this sounds a little defensive but it's really not a matter of that, I would just like this to stay on track. I appreciate people who are concerned about that but don't worry, I have dealt with Mals on multiple occasions. I know Mal usually refers to a Belgian Malinois but when we all know what I am talking about then I will refer to it as a Mal, Mally or whatever :) Yes, I know that having huge fonts and these colors looks unprofessional annoys some people, but I like to have big bright things and it's easier to distinguish my posts from other people.
The bolded two statements above seem mutually incompatible. If you've done all your research into a breed you should know that they are right for you.

I have one of my boys on a breeding contract. He is my second from the breeder and I wouldn't have been able to get the breeding contract without that prior relationship. As other have mentioned all throughout this thread, you will need to develop that relationship first.

Streak's breeding contract is pretty standard so once you develop that relationship and get a puppy, you can probably expect something similar. With him, the breeder needs to approve of the other dog and can also bring Streak back into their lines (with my approval of the other dog). He also needs to be titled* in something by the time he is two.

*or an equivalent. Streak's sport doesn't have titles, so the breeder accepted a top 10 placement at the international finals instead.
 

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FailedSlacker, doing all the research on a particular breed doesn't mean that I'm not going to do the same for other breeds. If I know about multiple dogs, I'm sure it's natural to consider other breeds of dogs if I enjoy them just as much as the Malamute.

I'm not doing breeding contracts and I'm not going to be forced to title my dog if I'm not breeding it for show. The dogs I am breeding are for work or companionship, not show. This is my personal preference and it's not up to you to question it or tell me otherwise. If it makes it a little more difficult for me to breed the dogs how I want them to be then oh well, I'll just have to work a little harder.

When I buy my dog, I'm not going to be sending him back to breed or not breed him with a different dog than the one they want him to. Once we have both agreed that I am going to breed him, he is mine to breed.

Also, I want to point out again that I would prefer everyone stay on topic with the question. I didn't come here asking for opinions on my knowledge or for information on what people would think. I am here for an answer to my question. I've said it before and while I appreciate everyone trying to help, everyone who isn't giving me an answer, or anyone who is questioning me and completely ignoring the question, is just taking up space and making it more difficult to find anyone who is actually answering my question. I did not come here for your opinions or questions, just for an answer.

~Thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Where are you located? I can look up some upcoming shows for you and help guide you in the right direction. I you're serious about becoming a quality reputable then you need to start with the best quality breeding stock that you can find, this means you'll need to get your dogs from breeders who are actively involved with the breed community. The national breed club usually has a state by state listing of breeders that are members in good standing with the breed club or they have contact info for the breeder referral liaison. Dog shows are great for meeting local-ish people who are involved with the breed and can give you a reference to their breeders if they aren't breeders themselves; it's also a great place to get hands on with the breed and see the quality of their dogs in person (photographs and websites can be very deceiving). Are you planning on doing anything with your Malamutes besides breeding them? I can look up the upcoming events in your area and try to direct you to like minded individuals. If you're more comfortable continuing the conversation in private you can pm me. But just as an FYI you'll need to develop a thick skin if you're going to be involved with anything in the purebred dog world, even just owning a purebred can be a faux paux with certain people. You wouldn't believe the crazy opinions people have tried to push onto me once they find out that I have show dogs and am involved in the breeding world.
Hello! Thank you for the reply, it's given me quite a bit of information. I would like to continue this in a PM, it's a little hard for me to keep up with specific people in threads. But, I'll need to wait a little bit because I haven't made enough posts to be allowed to PM yet :p
 

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FailedSlacker, doing all the research on a particular breed doesn't mean that I'm not going to do the same for other breeds. If I know about multiple dogs, I'm sure it's natural to consider other breeds of dogs if I enjoy them just as much as the Malamute.
Most reputable breeders know they love their breeds and don't even consider looking at others since they already found what they love.
I'm not doing breeding contracts and I'm not going to be forced to title my dog if I'm not breeding it for show. The dogs I am breeding are for work or companionship, not show. This is my personal preference and it's not up to you to question it or tell me otherwise. If it makes it a little more difficult for me to breed the dogs how I want them to be then oh well, I'll just have to work a little harder.
So you are going to be a back yard breeder. Got it. Titles aren't just limited to show dogs. Most working dogs have them as well. Reputable pet dogs have at least a CGN/CGC or an obedience title.

When I buy my dog, I'm not going to be sending him back to breed or not breed him with a different dog than the one they want him to. Once we have both agreed that I am going to breed him, he is mine to breed.
Good luck finding a reputable breeder to accept that. LIke I and others said, that is pretty much the standard.
Also, I want to point out again that I would prefer everyone stay on topic with the question. I didn't come here asking for opinions on my knowledge or for information on what people would think. I am here for an answer to my question. I've said it before and while I appreciate everyone trying to help, everyone who isn't giving me an answer, or anyone who is questioning me and completely ignoring the question, is just taking up space and making it more difficult to find anyone who is actually answering my question. I did not come here for your opinions or questions, just for an answer.

~Thank you.
Just because you aren't getting the answers you wanted doesn't mean we aren't answering or are answering off topic.
 

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FailedSlacker, doing all the research on a particular breed doesn't mean that I'm not going to do the same for other breeds. If I know about multiple dogs, I'm sure it's natural to consider other breeds of dogs if I enjoy them just as much as the Malamute.

I'm not doing breeding contracts and I'm not going to be forced to title my dog if I'm not breeding it for show. The dogs I am breeding are for work or companionship, not show. This is my personal preference and it's not up to you to question it or tell me otherwise. If it makes it a little more difficult for me to breed the dogs how I want them to be then oh well, I'll just have to work a little harder.

When I buy my dog, I'm not going to be sending him back to breed or not breed him with a different dog than the one they want him to. Once we have both agreed that I am going to breed him, he is mine to breed.

Also, I want to point out again that I would prefer everyone stay on topic with the question. I didn't come here asking for opinions on my knowledge or for information on what people would think. I am here for an answer to my question. I've said it before and while I appreciate everyone trying to help, everyone who isn't giving me an answer, or anyone who is questioning me and completely ignoring the question, is just taking up space and making it more difficult to find anyone who is actually answering my question. I did not come here for your opinions or questions, just for an answer.

~Thank you.

Here's your answer, and I posted it in my other reply to you, go to google, type in the breed of your choice and get a puppy from the breeder that's closest to you.

If you are just going to breed indiscriminately, and not worry about the conformation, health, and temperament of your dogs you can start breeding as soon as the puppies are old enough. If you are concerned about such things you'll have to do genetic testing on the puppies, you'll have to make sure they conform to breed standards as they grow up, and you'll have to pay close attention to temperament. You may have to spay or neuter more then one puppy because he or she is not fit to be bred, get another puppy and go through the whole process again.

You want a puppy from a reputable breeder you are going to have to play by their rules, you are not going to be able to walk away singing I did it my way. They put time, energy, money, effort, and tears into their dogs and they are not going to blindly hand a puppy over to some stranger and let them start breeding, doing so can ruin their kennels reputation.
 

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Failed Slacker and Rain,
If you don't like the way I'm doing things then stay off of my threads. I didn't come here for someone to question me and my methods. I came here for an answer. Next time, how about not acting like prick and instead try to help someone when they clearly asked for a specific thing. Just because I considered multiple animals doesn't make me a bad breeding candidate. People can love multiple things and it's not up to you to tell me what is and isn't right for me to do. Dogs that are bred for companionship, which is primarily what I am breeding, don't need titles, they have nothing to do with how the puppies will be with their family. Like I said, if you don't like what I've considered doing or what I've said, then leave me alone and stay off of anything I post. That goes for everyone. If you don't like what someone does then don't stop them from getting help from people who are interested in assisting someone instead of clogging the thread with long ass posts that keep them from seeing the useful posts. All you're doing is making yourself look unapproachable and rude.
 

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Honestly, this thread isn't going anywhere useful. It's just a cesspool of people who either took up my time judging me or questioning me when I just asked where I could find a dog that is suitable to breed, or people who were blocked out by those people and had actual answers that I couldn't read because I was too busy trying to deal with those other people and checking my methods. I appreciate the people who actually tried to help, but I don't think this thread will be getting any more useful to me at all. I apologize for anyone I couldn't explain myself properly to and I assure you I will be taking the utmost care of the animals I breed and their offspring. This has been more of a headache than it's worth and leaves a bad taste in my mouth. Only a day on this site and I've already had enough of it's community just by having a thread and by looking at other threads that had innocent questions about brushing their dog. I understand the whole "grow thicker skin" thing, but when people are downright judgmental and don't even try to get clarification for what you said and don't care about the fact that sometimes people don't explain things properly, it gets annoying and makes you not want to be a part of the same community. Great knowing some of you, but for not I think I will stick to talking to the professionals, tried veering away from that for a little bit and this happens. Thanks Bye.
 
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