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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Please delete if not allowed.
Dogs and babies dont mix, simple.
After another human death from an american staffy aka pitbull near me keep your dogs away from babies. Not just pits but keep every dog breed away from babies.
I expect backlash over this but im angry and venting
 

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No, I'm with you. The photos I see of babies ”being cute” with tense, unhappy dogs make my blood run cold. And last week someone told me her 3 year old grand daughter will not stop pulling her dog's ears and poking his eyes, despite being told numerous times not to - erm, be the adult! Just. Stop. Her.
 

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Oh those stupid social media posts with 'cute ' dog baby pics where the dog is giving all sorts of signals and people are ignoring them,, hes smiling is the one that make my hair stand on end.. DOGS DONT SMILE.. stupid people the dog is curling its lip....its unhappy and telling you, why wont you listen..???

I have one photo of my son then about 3 curled up on the sofa and he has his head resting on our then dogs hind quarters I walked in saw him and snapped the photo then moved him. But I dont share it.. I dont want to encourage others..

Growing up my childrens best friend was our dog but they were always told (and I made sure) that they showed the dog respect.Never disturb their sleep, never touch the bowl, never grab or pull.. In short never do anything with a dog that you wouldn't like done to you... None of my kids were ever bitten I think that says enough...
 

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An image that made my blood run cold was someone "proving" their dogs were kid-friendly--by allowing their two-year-old to climb into the whelping box period, but especially hours after birth. You could see the tension and whale eyes. No, just no.
 

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An image that made my blood run cold was someone "proving" their dogs were kid-friendly--by allowing their two-year-old to climb into the whelping box period, but especially hours after birth. You could see the tension and whale eyes. No, just no.
Ok .... my eyes nearly popped out of my head reading that.
 

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Unfortunately people in general have developed a false sense of security in believing that 'good dogs don't (and won't ever) bite', neglecting to even consider that even the 'best' dog has it's limits and can bite, in a fraction of a second, if it feels it has no other choice. The phrase 'good with children' further adds to this fantasy/false sense of security. Sad reality is that when it does happen, the dog is the one who pays the ultimate price for human failure to recognize that they are the ones who have failed the dog and put the dog in a potentially dangerous/risky situation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
An image that made my blood run cold was someone "proving" their dogs were kid-friendly--by allowing their two-year-old to climb into the whelping box period, but especially hours after birth. You could see the tension and whale eyes. No, just no.
I have no words im speachless
 

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Statistics from dogsbite.org

"Parental presence was reported in 43.6% of cases, and most attacks occurred in the evening (46.8%). Injuries often involved the head–neck region (92.1%), and 72.5% were of major severity ... The pet status of the dog did not have a protective effect on the severity of injury."
"The most commonly identified breed was the pit bull, followed by the Labrador retriever. Pit bulls were also the most commonly identified breed involved in major injuries."

From a separate study:

Importantly, this study is the first to accurately establish that pit bulls are the breed most commonly associated with ocular injuries (25%). Most alarming is the observation that when attacks come from unfamiliar dogs, the pit bull was responsible for 60% and 63% of all injuries and ocular injuries, respectively."

And:

In 2020, 79% of adults killed by dogs involved pit bulls (22 of 28). Of adult male deaths (≥ 25 years old), 92% were killed by pit bulls.
2020 U.S.

Dog Bite Fatalities - DogsBite.org, June 2021
 

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Statistics from dogsbite.org

"Parental presence was reported in 43.6% of cases, and most attacks occurred in the evening (46.8%). Injuries often involved the head–neck region (92.1%), and 72.5% were of major severity ... The pet status of the dog did not have a protective effect on the severity of injury."
"The most commonly identified breed was the pit bull, followed by the Labrador retriever. Pit bulls were also the most commonly identified breed involved in major injuries."

From a separate study:

Importantly, this study is the first to accurately establish that pit bulls are the breed most commonly associated with ocular injuries (25%). Most alarming is the observation that when attacks come from unfamiliar dogs, the pit bull was responsible for 60% and 63% of all injuries and ocular injuries, respectively."

And:

In 2020, 79% of adults killed by dogs involved pit bulls (22 of 28). Of adult male deaths (≥ 25 years old), 92% were killed by pit bulls.
2020 U.S.

Dog Bite Fatalities - DogsBite.org, June 2021
Although that data doesn't reflect it, I actually like pitbulls! The ones I've seen and interacted with have been delightful!

But the numbers dont lie, they do pose more potential danger, especially with children and older adults... I was very surprised seeing labs at second in that first study!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Although that data doesn't reflect it, I actually like pitbulls! The ones I've seen and interacted with have been delightful!

But the numbers dont lie, they do pose more potential danger, especially with children and older adults... I was very surprised seeing labs at second in that first study!
Im not surprised in the slightest about labs because parents would see them as a fool proof breed and let kids hug them. I find them to an aggressive breed but thats my personal opinion
 

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I'm not surprised either, but because pits and labs are very common. So you will get more instances of bites from them than you would from something very rare. If pit bulls were responsible for 60% of the injuries, we really also need to know what % of all the dogs in the study were pit bull.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I would also imagine thered be an enormous amount of small dogs biting kids and adults but because injuries would be mild they would be swept under the carpet and there wouldnt be records of them.
One of my neighbours thinks jesse is a horrible aggressive dog. Jesse barks viciously at a particular small child neighour out of pure fear not aggression. He learnt this childs scary because she would bolt full speed up to him and try hug him and jesse would lunge and snap. The mother tried each time to tell her kid no but to no avail. So now the mum physicaly restrains the kid if we walk past when there out. Ive done the right thing and prewarned the mother each time keep child away jesse will snap. But a different dog could kill instantly.
 

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A few years ago I got absolutely slated for saying that I had pulled a child's hair. ( She eas about 8 yrs old)
But I was just saving that child from a dog attack and I was saving my dog from death.
The child belong to a neighbour they would pop round and this child would call my border collie over and then pull his tail as he went past.
Oscar was a fantastic good natured dog but I knew that he had his limits the same as the rest of us.
I had told the child no I had told the mother to stop her child doing it and the mother did nothing.
So one day as they sat there the child called Oscar over and grabbed his tail ,as she let go and I reached over and pulled her ponytail sharply she wailed she cried..waaaa how dare you..
I put my most innocent smile on and said oh I'm sorry I thought you must like it because you always do it to Oscar...
That child never touched my dog again.
A short sharp lesson because the mother was an idiot but it save both the child and the dog from misery.
 

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These assertions are all true! Small dogs tend to bite but inflict little to no harm so they don't show up much.

But I posted the website, so you can criticize or maybe look for yourself???

The thing is, and this is US data only, that many places have actually banned pitbulls. Denver Colorado is one I'm familiar with personally, having lived for years just outside, but near, that metropolis.

In the years following the pitbull ban, labrador retrievers took the mantle of most bitey dogs causing the most injuries.

Focussing on other breeds though, they are all represented. Any dog will bite if/when the see no other solution, or if they believe their pack is being harmed/threatened!

And I can tell you that I had a beautiful, smart, well behaved Chihuahua with me for a couple years that came up off a sofa and tried to bite a lady in the throat for giving her newly found friend a hug! He misunderstood and reacted.

Shocked me, because he'd never been aggressive or reactive prior.

Stuff happens! Oh and contrary to what I may or may not have thought previously, Chihuahuas are actually really good and smart dogs, they just don't get the training they need typically, due to their size....
 

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I agree, people do treat small dogs differently, and one of my pet peeves is people picking up small dogs to move them, just because they can; and it's convenient. Small dogs do need to be lifted (in and out of cars, on to the vet table etc) so it is important to train them to be comfortable with that. But so many times we get people here saying their dog has started growling when being handled and it is often a small dog who has experienced non-consensual handling - and is reaching the end of his tolerance reserves.

And I certainly didn't mean I was criticising the data - far from it. I was just observing that statistically, it's not giving the full story without knowing the breed stats too. And of course, the situations that the bites occurred. Like the chihuahua, maybe the dogs were taken by surprise, saw no alternative, or maybe this was a result of long term abuse - or who knows what.
 

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Just anecdotal data, but here in Australia I have noticed 9 times out of 10 it is cattle dogs that are snappy. We get pitbull mixes in all the time at my clinic, and you can often probe their wounds etc without sedation and they take it like a champ.

But the cattle dogs we get often will snap from just trying to restrain them or check their temperature.

Completely understandable, we are invading their safety bubble, but its the pitbulls in my area that seem to have a higher tolerance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Just anecdotal data, but here in Australia I have noticed 9 times out of 10 it is cattle dogs that are snappy. We get pitbull mixes in all the time at my clinic, and you can often probe their wounds etc without sedation and they take it like a champ.

But the cattle dogs we get often will snap from just trying to restrain them or check their temperature.

Completely understandable, we are invading their safety bubble, but its the pitbulls in my area that seem to have a higher tolerance.
Thats absolutly correct cattle dogs are very high on the list of dog attacks by breed. But the point is dont let any dogs next to your babies snd especialy dont leave them alone with them. While they might have a higher tolerance fact is pitbulls and crosses kill quick if they suddenly decide enoughs enough which makes them even more dangerous than a snappy cattle dog. Theres 2 many baby deaths and toddler deaths happening all over the world to ignore this.
 
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