Dog Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
925 Posts
Thanks for the feedback. I think for just 6 weeks here and about 1 year old she is doing pretty well.

And while understand the idea behind positive reinforcement and believe it is the right thing to do in the long run, I still need to make sure the here and now is OK as well.

I am certain that she is part Husky and as far as I know they are a difficult breed. They listen in training (inside/outside with distractions, etc..) but not so well when it comes to it. For example I can throw treats on the ground during a training session and she wont even move (I wouldn't even know when to give the leave it command), however during a walk i can show her treats and she does not even care.

I watched Kikopups videos and she is one that speaks not to manhandle a dog, like pulling on the leash.
Honestly if I do not pull Sophie on the leash, we would not make it past 1/4 mile and she would eat tons of cat,dog and coyote poo, as well as every other trash on the ground (including tons of chicken bones). Once she zoned in a a sniff target there is NOTHING right now i can do to distract her, other than to drag her away.
So if I would not use force (pulling her away) I would either be confined of not walking her at all (not an option) or walking in my yard (which is a wee bit too small).

Earlier this week at the dog park I saw how difficult it is to handle a not properly trained dog. As a 90lbs lab did not want to give up Sophies squeaker toy. The owner had to pry out of his mouth and got growled at... Certainly a good drop-it training earlier would have helped...

If compared raising a dog like a kid, well I would be much stricter to a kid than to the dog. I certainly would not feed my kid treats all day long just for sleeping peacefully next to me...
Hi Timrf79, I understand that this is a really difficult time for you, especially as you weren't exactly planning on getting a dog. I just want you to direct you towards this blog, it's written by a dog trainer who has crossed over from forceful methods to training as gently and positively as humanly possible. She talks about training philosophies, shares her mistakes, demonstrates the importance of management, and is very good at demonstrating the efficacy of positive reinforcement and the problems with forceful methods- in a scientific and theoretical way as well as emotionally. I hope you can read some of her articles and get a more thorough understanding of why we use positive reinforcement and how to maximise its effectiveness.

eileenanddogs | What my dogs teach me.eileenanddogs | What my dogs teach me.

(Kikopup is great for training tips, but her perfect-seeming dogs can be a little frustrating to watch sometimes, and Eileen is very candid about her failings as well as her successes.)
 

· Registered
Joined
·
925 Posts
I started reading on that blog and I really like it. Using the Humane Hierarchy clearly shows that there are limits to positive reinforcement. It also explains how some of the methods listed in this forum would qualify as "positive punishment". I will keeping reading at this, as it is very informative.
I think you might be confusing your quadrants a bit- fairly sure you mean negative punishment (taking something away resulting in the behaviour decreasing e.g. removing a treat if a dog jumps for it) rather than positive punishment (adding something resulting in the behaviour decreasing, e.g. a squirt of water to stop barking). They can be quite hard to get straight in the mind.

The point of the humane hierarchy isn't that everything on it is ok to use! I'm sorry if reading the blog gave you that impression, that wasn't my intention.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top