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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone i would love to know how is your training as well as what tricks have you taught your dogs or what tricks you would love to teach them?Was it easy or hard? I guess some tricks are easier to learn than others. For my puppy he learned, sit, semi-stay, down, roll-over, play dead, spin, stand up on hind legs, high five and knows to get his toys when asked as well as is completely potty trained. His recall however, its pretty bad, can't seem to get this to work unless i am in the kitchen he comes running really quick when called lol.

How do you train? I would love to hear from you guys and how you train as well as which tricks were easier to teach than others. I can't seem to get him to learn crawl even though he does it on his own all the time in the mornings when he wakes up, but i can't seem to get him to do it on command, any tips?
 

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I have recently started using the clicker method which I found has been very useful for things like roll over etc. I usually have it attached to my wrist so it is always handy. My dog rolled over when trying to get him to lie down I immediately clicked and has stuck since.

You could try the click method when you see him doing this in the morning, after a few days he may start to get the idea which you can then start to add your cue.

Recall was the first thing I taught my dogs, even now when they are one year old I still have to keep doing this. Around our property is fine, but trying to get them to recall in unfamiliar surroundings is hard as they are too interested whats going on around them.

My recall really means 'Come get some chicken' to my dogs, if I don't have treats, there is no chance! (I'm working on not treating all the time)

Just make sure your recall cue is consistent, and reward well when he comes to you. Try in one area first he is used to, then try doing this in less familiar places with only little distractions.
 

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I'm well versed in the theory of clicker training but have only just started to use it on my parent's 12 year old dog. She was never properly trained, but picked up sit, down, rudimentary recall, rudimentary stay, "woah there" (slow down) and "go on then" (speed up/go sniff). That's pretty much it. I've taught her nose targeting with clicker training, that was pretty quick to achieve. Now we're trying to learn spin. This is proving more difficult, due to both of our inexperience! I've tried luring, but she is wise to that and just bounces back instead of turning. It's a nice learning challenge, trying to figure out how to explain it to her!

For your own dog, you could try capturing- when you see him crawling of his own accord, click and treat. You can then eventually put a cue on it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I have recently started using the clicker method which I found has been very useful for things like roll over etc. I usually have it attached to my wrist so it is always handy. My dog rolled over when trying to get him to lie down I immediately clicked and has stuck since.

You could try the click method when you see him doing this in the morning, after a few days he may start to get the idea which you can then start to add your cue.

Recall was the first thing I taught my dogs, even now when they are one year old I still have to keep doing this. Around our property is fine, but trying to get them to recall in unfamiliar surroundings is hard as they are too interested whats going on around them.

My recall really means 'Come get some chicken' to my dogs, if I don't have treats, there is no chance! (I'm working on not treating all the time)

Just make sure your recall cue is consistent, and reward well when he comes to you. Try in one area first he is used to, then try doing this in less familiar places with only little distractions.
Thanks pelican, i will try to lure him with some chicken when practicing recall, and i'll try the clicker in the morning. great tips!The same similar thing happened to me I also took advantage of playing dead and he just rolled over after and it stuck.
 

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Abby knows sit, stay, come (still adding distance and distraction), down, off or leave it, sit pretty, paw, high five, focus or look at me, back up, touch or target, let's go, get your ball, jump, in, out, and potentially crawl lol. She's also having a hard time with crawl. I'd say on average, she learns pretty quickly. Most of these commands took just one 10 min session. However, some took longer over several sessions/days. I train by practicing positive reinforcement and watching videos honestly lol. She's deathly afraid of the clicker so I've been working on desensitizing and reconditioning her to the noise. Until then, I just use a verbal marker for training, but the clicker would be a bit easier for some commands, especially advanced ones. Also, I use a lot of visual cues or sign language. I've had her little over a month; adult rescue.
She responds better to gestures and visual cues than verbal. She can perform most of her commands without me saying anything lol. I read somewhere that dogs are visual learners and learn better through visual cues that verbal ones. This makes sense to me since dogs communicate with each other through visual cues and body gestures while us humans verbalize. We're just a bunch of babbling monkeys to them lol.

For recall, I recommend this video. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=QonpHq930Rk and an updated one https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nLo8YP4-D8Y. I had a basenji whom, like a typical basenji, was very independent and could care less about me lol. I worked with him on a long leash and used a high value treat. I advise only giving this treat during recalls and no other time! We also practiced recall indoors with his kibble. I'd have my boyfriend sit at one end of the apartment and me at the other and just call the dog back and forth between us, treating him when he got to one of us. He would work for his kibble (better to do this when your dog is hungry and after some exercise) so I got to feed a portion of his meal for the day through this training lol.

Good luck with his recall and further training!
 

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Abby knows sit, stay, come (still adding distance and distraction), down, off or leave it, sit pretty, paw, high five, focus or look at me, back up, touch or target, let's go, get your ball, jump, in, out, and potentially crawl lol. She's also having a hard time with crawl. I'd say on average, she learns pretty quickly. Most of these commands took just one 10 min session. However, some took longer over several sessions/days. I train by practicing positive reinforcement and watching videos honestly lol. She's deathly afraid of the clicker so I've been working on desensitizing and reconditioning her to the noise. Until then, I just use a verbal marker for training, but the clicker would be a bit easier for some commands, especially advanced ones. Also, I use a lot of visual cues or sign language. I've had her little over a month; adult rescue.
She responds better to gestures and visual cues than verbal. She can perform most of her commands without me saying anything lol. I read somewhere that dogs are visual learners and learn better through visual cues that verbal ones. This makes sense to me since dogs communicate with each other through visual cues and body gestures while us humans verbalize. We're just a bunch of babbling monkeys to them lol.

For recall, I recommend this video. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=QonpHq930Rk and an updated one https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nLo8YP4-D8Y. I had a basenji whom, like a typical basenji, was very independent and could care less about me lol. I worked with him on a long leash and used a high value treat. I advise only giving this treat during recalls and no other time! We also practiced recall indoors with his kibble. I'd have my boyfriend sit at one end of the apartment and me at the other and just call the dog back and forth between us, treating him when he got to one of us. He would work for his kibble (better to do this when your dog is hungry and after some exercise) so I got to feed a portion of his meal for the day through this training lol.

Good luck with his recall and further training!
Excellent video on recall thanks!! I'll definitely give this a shot, btw how did you teach your Abby to sit pretty? Its always so fun to see what other dogs can do they are so smart. I never had a maltese before and am amazed at what a quick learner he is.
 

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It really depends on your dog, your patience, and your imagination. :)

My elderly Jack Russell, who was 10 when she came to us, lived to do tricks, and could learn simple behaviours in 5-10 minutes. More complex behaviours took longer based on their complexity, and sometimes it would take me weeks of short daily sessions to completely shape a behaviour. I'm just going to make a list of all the things I can remember that she knew. I'll try to group it loosely, because many behaviours chained off of others. There were a lot of things I didn't teach because of her age.

Down, Lie flat on either side, Belly up, Belly up and air walking, Play dead, Roll over to either side, Crawling forward and backwards, bow, scooting backwards from a bow, backing up, march, shake either paw, high five with either paw, double high five, sit pretty, reach for the sky, standing on hind legs, going from sit pretty to standing on hind legs, turning around when on hind legs, spin in either direction, jumping vertically (from stand, sit, sitting pretty, or standing on her hind legs) jumping over something (she could easily jump a four foot fence from a standstill) jumping through a hoop, getting up on a bed, or table, or chair, or bucket, or bucket on a chair and performing any stationary trick. She knew the names of about 15 people and all of our other pets and could find them when asked. She knew the names of each of her toys, each of the other dog's toys, and could fetch any named toy, clean up toys, bring any item that was pointed at, drop (on floor), give, take, take to bed, go to bed, go to crate, load up in car, wait, stay, out (of kitchen/room/location), climb a ladder or angled tree, go through a tunnel, wrap herself in a blanket, touch with nose, touch with paw, touch any named object with nose or paw when asked (watching her whack the puppy on the head was always amusing because she didn't like him very much), be gentle, kisses (nose touch to human mouth, no licking), licks (licking hand or face), come when called indoors or out, call off squirrels or birds or other dogs, outside, inside, upstairs, downstairs, lets go (keep walking with me instead of doing whatever you are doing) and the almighty LEAVE IT!

She had some major submissive peeing issues with strangers and was a very status seeking, anxious bitch, and training always left her happy and relaxed, so we did quite a bit of it.

I think anyone who enjoys training who owns a dog who enjoys learning probably has a list at least as long as mine. :)

ETA I couldn't get her to Loose Leash Walk to save my soul. :D
 

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The latest I taught Jack was to 'shake' by giving me his paw from a seated position. Took about 5 days with brief training each day.
 

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Yeah theres definitely a lot of factors that will change how long it might take your dog to learn it... but Im also a big fan of clicker training and its something Ive only started using with my current dog but have made lots of success with.
For her she had never crawled on her own until I taught her, but I did so by getting her in a lay down and having her follow my hand while I stepped backward, only enough so that she wouldn't bother standing up. I would click and reward when she would use her limbs to pull herself forward while asking to "crawl" and over a period of 3 days (about three, 5-10 minute sessions a day that include other tricks) she did it flawlessly. Though if I go long enough without practice she will attempt to "cheat" by raising her chest off the floor ever so slightly lol.
She knows loads of commands and tricks and Ive used the clicker for most of them. While its not a necessity by any means, if youre like me and have trouble being consistent, a clicker is a way to compensate for that (in a sense) seeing as how you are giving the dog a consistent sound that ALWAYS means reward so they can figure out very quickly what behavior it is you are rewarding.
I have no trouble teaching her tricks anywhere between a day to three days. The hardest trick so far that she's learning is "go to your mark" which is where I throw an object somewhere in the yard and she has to run to it and sit on it. While she learned the concept in a day, getting her to stay where she was AND sit directly on the mark have taken about 4-5 days to learn and still requires practice for consistency.
 

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At 5 months old Zeke can sit, drop, beg, shake and is completely house-trained. He will stay 70% of the time and we are currently working on his recall, which is getting better.

Zeke has the attention span of a goldfish, so training takes time, but he is very switched on when he is paying attention. I'm thinking about starting clicker training, from what I've read it seems a very effective method.
 

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Merlin knows basic obedience: sit, lay down, stay (sort of), come, get down (informally taught), leave it. I also have taught him shake and high five. I'm really lucky, he catches on so quickly once he gets it.

Shake was probably the hardest to teach because I taught him by holding a treat in my fist and trying to get him to paw it. The problem was that I taught Merlin "leave it" in a simialr fashion bu closing a treat in my fist. Having a clicker really helped me teach him shake. Once he learned shake, high five was easy.
 

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I've had Bennie almost three months and she knew no commands when I first got her, she was house broken but that was it. She knows sit, lay down, play dead, leave it, crawl, pick it up (like toys), spin around, paw, touch, walk on, stay, come (not well proofed though) and I just started trying to get a sit pretty out of her today. I think that'll be tough, her balance is awful ;) I also had a decent drop it out of her for a while but we've recently gotten into tug and that's gone mostly down the drain... Oops...

How are you trying to teach crawl? Bennie learned that one in only two short training sessions and she looooves it! She can get frustrated pretty quickly but she picked that one up quickly.

Shake was probably the hardest to teach because I taught him by holding a treat in my fist and trying to get him to paw it. The problem was that I taught Merlin "leave it" in a simialr fashion bu closing a treat in my fist. Having a clicker really helped me teach him shake. Once he learned shake, high five was easy.
I had the SAME exact issue teaching Bennie paw (like high five)! I taught leave it the same way initially and even though we'd progressed past that to leaving things on the ground, she still figured it would be better not to paw at the hand and just look away. Ended up having to first teach her paw targeting on a tupperware lid and use that to get her to high five me :p
 

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Ella knows sit, lay down, lay down on the side, stay, look at me, spin, heel, stop, come (if you feel like it.. :p), fetch ball, fetch rope-toy, fetch random stick, next to me.

The spin is not perfect yet, she`ll only do it for a treat and two spins at a time.

I want to teach her play dead :)

We don`t use a clicker (yet).

I think she`s pretty smart and learns fast.
 

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I found 'touch' was quite easy for him to learn and useful too. Using touch he learnt to go through my legs and round to either the left or right (through, round and clockwise - probably not the best terms to have chosen!). That's been useful in untangling ourselves from trees, though go back seems to work just as well.
Most things were almost instantaneous, though sometimes still he has his mind on other things so it takes a bit longer. I think roll over took the longest, about 3 sessions, but I don't use a clicker.
He also knows: paw, other paw, stay, wait, lie down, sit, it's bedtime, find it, this way, gently, slow down, etc, but we still have very little luck with drop it or leave it (except indoors), and we use this way or bye instead of come.
The ability or desire to learn/respond is dependent upon the number of lizards, sparrows, squirrels in the vicinity, so the indoor terms work best!
@ CadenceDiscordia & Eenypup, I taught paw simply by holding his paw and saying paw, good boy (and a treat of course).
 

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@ CadenceDiscordia & Eenypup, I taught paw simply by holding his paw and saying paw, good boy (and a treat of course).
We tried that too, but she thought the trick was to begrudgingly allow me to pick up her paw. Wouldn't do it at all herself! Silly girl.
 

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Excellent video on recall thanks!! I'll definitely give this a shot, btw how did you teach your Abby to sit pretty? Its always so fun to see what other dogs can do they are so smart. I never had a maltese before and am amazed at what a quick learner he is.
I used this video to teach Abby to "sit pretty". It only took one or two sessions. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bM3WaKANM9c. This is another wonderful video by kikopup that uses a clicker to teach "sit pretty" and some advice on supporting your dog if they easily tip over or just lack the ability to balance on their hind feet. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IQUerO0woqw
 

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Quenya enjoys learning tricks and "commands", and after owning her a little over a year she knows sit, stand, stay, come, leave-it lie down, touch, twirl, lie flat, roll over, shake right and left, high five, crawl, beg/sit pretty, toss your head, speak, hide (cover face w/paw), high-high (leap straight into air), jump backwards, jump an object, and watch me. She almost has weave-between-my-legs down, I just need to fade the lure. She learned most of these within two/three months of getting her.

Eleni I've had for three months and could definitely have done more with, but my priority with her has been building relationship, basic "good behavior" like no jumping/biting/howling/screaming/destroying-the-house/attacking-the-other-dogs-when-they-have-a-treat-you-want, and exposing her to different situations/places/people/noises, etcetera rather than training. So at this point she knows sit, shake and twirl well. I'm not sure if she understands stay and come and just doesn't want to listen, or if she just hasn't gotten it 100% yet :p.

Victoria...ahm. She knows sit and come and she decides when she's going to listen to them. But I've never worked on training with her, this was all her previous owner.
 

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I use positive reinforcement with verbal markers to train. I've tried clickers but I've found that a simple verbal marker like 'Yes' works best for me. I use food treats as rewards but our new puppy also responds to play rewards well.

Chloe, our Chihuahua, knows: sit (although she won't sit on hard surfaces that bother her behind), come, lay down, get up, roll over, shake, leave it, stay, spin, walk (on hind legs), dance (a combo of spin and walk), beg (aka sit pretty), 'Release the Hounds!' (aka speak), high five, jump, jump the stick, jump the hoop, go get [blank] (a person, a cat or a few objects), get in crate, up/down (onto or off of a low table or other object), kiss (lick on cue). We're still working on some movement tricks like weave and walk backwards.

Penelope, our Yorkie-Poo puppy is still learning the basics although she's gotten sit down quite well at this point. We've been working a lot on recall and she's slowly getting better at this. Lay down and roll over are also going well. She is also learning how to play ball (fetch and bring back), something Chloe doesn't have an interest in doing.
 

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Lets see, Hannah the chow knows shake, high five, guess the hand (the treat is in) leave it, sit, down, and wait. she also knows to always sit when we come to a street corner.

One failed trick hannah could never quite get the hang of was ringing the bell to go outside. I would tell her to sit then ring the bell hanging from the door knob. And she learned it well. She would come get me to let her out then as soon as I aproached the door she would sit and ring the bell...just like I taught her, oops :D

Murphy the pom doesn't do tricks persay. One thing I did teach him is that if he wants me to pick him up then he has to turn with his back to me so I can pick him up from around his belly instead of under his arms. He'll put his front paws on my leg and as soon as I bend down to get him he turns and backs into me.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I used this video to teach Abby to "sit pretty". It only took one or two sessions. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bM3WaKANM9c. This is another wonderful video by kikopup that uses a clicker to teach "sit pretty" and some advice on supporting your dog if they easily tip over or just lack the ability to balance on their hind feet. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IQUerO0woqw
Thanks! I was able to get him to do it but he looses his balance and hangs on to my hand for support. The kikopup video was really helpful! He does the command every time just looses his balance and falls back or to the side. I guess i just have to keep practicing with him.
 
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