Dog Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
I have an older (we are guessing almost 10) beagle who is still full of energy and a pleasure to have with us for the past 3 years.

He is a rescue dog and we know nothing about his past or his heritage.

He is most certainly a regular tri-coloured beagle, but he is too big to be pure and his black fur is peppered with brown. His snout also seems to be longer than other beagles.

The beagle bay and nose are certainly inside his DNA but he just seems to be too big and long to be pure.

Weight: 24 kg/46 lbs (he is not overweight, he is at his ideal size)
Height: 18 inches (at shoulder blade)
Length: 21 inches (from collar to beginning of tail)







I would appreciate any ideas.

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Basset?

Basset was our first thought. But our kennel operation (Mann's Best Friend - Cindy Mann - Absolutely amazing!!!) and our vet both agree that he's too tall and not wrinkly/flabby enough to be a basset.

We actually thought he might have some American Foxhound in him.
@SueM: I'm hearing the "poorly bred beagle" comment and trying not to take offence ;). Especially since you might be right.... it seems to fit.... lol. But does that happen? Could a Beagle be bigger because he's not perfectly bred?

Thanks!

Pat
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,906 Posts
Basset was our first thought. But our kennel operation (Mann's Best Friend - Cindy Mann - Absolutely amazing!!!) and our vet both agree that he's too tall and not wrinkly/flabby enough to be a basset.

We actually thought he might have some American Foxhound in him.

@SueM: I'm hearing the "poorly bred beagle" comment and trying not to take offence ;). Especially since you might be right.... it seems to fit.... lol. But does that happen? Could a Beagle be bigger because he's not perfectly bred?

Thanks!

Pat
It's not meant to be offensive, in fact most rescue dogs are poorly bred because whomever bred them didn't have the standard or a purpose in mind when they did so. Doesn't mean rescue dogs aren't great or have value, just that most wouldn't succeed in a conformation ring! :p

He could be purebred. I could honestly see a bit of Basset as his ears are a bit long and his back is too. Could be that he's something like 1/4 or 1/8 Basset and only a few traits came through - who knows.

He's very handsome, though, and he looks really sweet. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,623 Posts
He looks purebred to me. Beagles are a very widespread and popular breed with show, pet, and field lines. A lot of beagles are taller than the standard, have long noses, and have brown in their black (in fact most beagles have some brown in their saddle).

TBH I really hate when people use the term "poorly bred" to describe a dog that isn't show standard. It almost feels elitist and snobby. There are plenty of other "standards" for a lot of breeds, including beagles. A truly poorly bred dog would be a dog with bad genetic problems, like poor structure or temperament.

My beagle doesn't look like a show dog at all because she comes from field lines, that doesn't make her poorly bred lol.

But, on topic, OP I think you just have a tall beagle. It's possible that there's some basset in there, but most basset crosses tend to have longer ears, be a bit shorter, and have the typical "Basset feet". Judging by his fur texture, I'd guess he's probably a pet line beagle. It's a super common breed and it's not uncommon to find purebreds running around.

Here's a picture of my tall, field line beagle. She has a lot of the features Jake has--long nose, tall, and she also has the brown peppering in her saddle.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
900 Posts
Some Bassets can be quite tall. I fostered 2 pure breed Bassets and they were pretty big/tall/long. With a mix of 2 or more breeds, you can get any combination of physical characteristics. Just because a dog may have Basset on their make-up does not automatically mean they will be short and stocky.

Either way, he is super cute, love the ears. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
951 Posts
Basset was our first thought. But our kennel operation (Mann's Best Friend - Cindy Mann - Absolutely amazing!!!) and our vet both agree that he's too tall and not wrinkly/flabby enough to be a basset.

We actually thought he might have some American Foxhound in him.

@SueM: I'm hearing the "poorly bred beagle" comment and trying not to take offence ;). Especially since you might be right.... it seems to fit.... lol. But does that happen? Could a Beagle be bigger because he's not perfectly bred?

Thanks!

Pat
Poorly bred simply means that the parents were selected without paying attention to how well they meet a fairly arbitrary breed standard. (Many 'field lines' also don't meet the standard, although they are generally bred based on performance)

Your dog may be pure beagle, but just back yard breeders or even from a puppymill where little attention is paid to structure.

It is also possible that he has some basset in him, or even a dash of daschund.

It's actually a bit common to cross a beagle with a basset, especially someone who is looking for basset qualities in a hunter and can't get ahold of the few field lines of bassets left. They'll cross a show-line basset (much lower and wrinklier) with a hunting beagle. Heck, some people are crossing beagle into basset as a way to overcome the health problems that come from the extreme length, super short legs, wrinkly skin, and pink under-eye condition (whose name is eluding me) so prevalent in the common basset today.

The muzzle size, flews, and ears aren't as big as i'd expect to see with a beagle x basset mix. It's even a bit narrow for a beagle, which makes me think daschund as mentioned above. Nothing more than a 1/4 though maybe less.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
951 Posts
Some Bassets can be quite tall. I fostered 2 pure breed Bassets and they were pretty big/tall/long. With a mix of 2 or more breeds, you can get any combination of physical characteristics. Just because a dog may have Basset on their make-up does not automatically mean they will be short and stocky.

Either way, he is super cute, love the ears. :)
My experience has been the opposite. Finding old-type longer legged bassets (and mind you I mean long for a basset) that aren't mixes with something else is pretty rare, while beagles, well you see a lot of off-standard dogs coming from all sorts of directions (approaching harrier size, extra tiny, long, etc). Also considering beagles are more popular the get more animals produced by backyard breeders and puppymills

for reference this is what I think of structurally when I say hunting line basset


while this is the more common basset structure, brought on by extreme breeding for the show ring, and there are so many more extreme show ring types, it's not just 'champions' (and I use that word loosely) that look like this

 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top