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I am looking for a new dog to have indoors. He/she must not leave hair around on the floor, nor make noise while I am in my office. Could you be so kind as to give me a few breeds :confused: ?

Thanks :thumbsup:
 

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A breed with hair, vs. fur, (i.e. a poodle... or portuguese water dog, which is not common) is the only dog that will not shed like a typical dog. Not make noise? That's more personality than breed, although some breeds are more vocal than others.

Instead of looking for a breed, you should go through a rescue that has dogs they are already fostering so that they know the personality and can match you. Otherwise it's kind of hit and miss. There are probably some poodle rescues in your area.

P.S. All dogs are pretty dirty. ;)
 

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Chinese Crested probably leave the least hair ;). Other than that, short haired dogs with no double coat like greyhounds or whippets. But I agree with seebrown, all dogs are pretty dirty :). If the cleanliness and quietness of your house is very important to you, maybe a dog isn't your ideal pet...
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I am looking for a new dog to have indoors. He/she must not leave hair around on the floor, nor make noise while I am in my office. Could you be so kind as to give me a few breeds :confused: ?

Thanks :thumbsup:
All dogs shed. All dogs except the hairless. All animals which have hair, including man, grow it, the hair has a life span, it dies and falls out. How much hair one might find around the house, depends purely on the grooming vigilance of the owner. Certain breeds with double coats, 'blow' their coat during certain seasons.

Some obtain a short haired breed, thinking the shedding will be less. Ask any Lab owner and they will tell you the truth.

You didn't say what size of dog might suit you, but I'm thinking maybe a Whippet or Italian Greyhound. Short hair and easy for you to groom. A quick once-over with wet hands will take care of any loose hair. You will have to decide how much exercise your new dog will need and your ability to fulfill the need. If you do consider larger, there are tons of very laid-back Greyhounds, needing wonderful homes. Again, very easy for you to groom.

Since you take your dog to the office, I imagine you don't want something like a Great Dane or giant breed. That said, I often took my GDs to work with me. They were well trained and the office staff all knew they were not to encourage wild playing when at work.

Lizzie
 

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I've found that male dogs tend to be a lot dirtier than females, but that's just mine. It doesn't really apply to all dogs, as there is a female husky I regularly see at the dog park covered in mud.
I have an American-Eskimo, basset hound, Beauceron, chow mix that never goes outside in the rain, and refuses to get wet or dirty. She's pretty much a pretty princess and is very quiet for the most part.
My Chow, German shepherd, Brussels griffon, Shiba Inu mix puppy, however, gets hosed down at least once a day because he loves to roll in cat-pee and mud. He drinks water and dribbles it around the hardwood floors. When he eats, he foams at the mouth and wipes his mouth all over the place, leaving trails of slime like a little slug. Oh and at the dog park, his best friend is the giant vat of mud in which he coats himself entirely.
When it comes to breeds, it's really hard to find out which is dirty and which is clean, however I've heard that Carolina Dogs (aka American Dingos) are very clean but it's difficult to find a true, pure Carolina these days, even in SC.
 

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Double coated dogs can actually be lower shedders...depends on the breed. Scotties, Westies, & Cairns are low shed dogs. I never have hair in my floor...the most shedding he does is a few hairs on a white t-shirt if he rubs against me, and even then it's only when he hasn't been brushed in the last few days.

As for barking, that is probably going to be a dog to dog thing.
 

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Greyhounds get my vote for an office dog and not too much grooming...give one a couch and he can turn into a potatoe easily! Porties are high energy and need lots of exercise, not to mention how strong willed they can be without a lot of training, lol!
Tibetan terriers are a nice breed, and poodles for non shedding too much!! Why not take one of those online what dog to get personality/lifestyle questionaires??? An older shelter dog would be ideal!!!!
 

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Poodles/bichons/havanese don't shed. We have a Coton de Tulear - my allergic son doesn't react to him and he really doesn't shed at all. I will comb him for 45 minutes and get almost nothing. He doesn't bark, though I have read that some do. Training can help with barking. We live in a big city with neighbors close by so lots of barking would be a problem.
 

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Poodles/bichons/havanese don't shed. We have a Coton de Tulear - my allergic son doesn't react to him and he really doesn't shed at all. I will comb him for 45 minutes and get almost nothing. He doesn't bark, though I have read that some do. Training can help with barking. We live in a big city with neighbors close by so lots of barking would be a problem.
all dogs shed unless they are hairless.....
 

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Thank you GDM! I do so wish, that people would stop speaking of non-shedding dogs. There is absolutely, no such thing, unless completely hairless to begin with.

Poodles for example, have curly coats. If groomed regularly, there is no doubt that the owner would find little or no hair, around the house. If left ungroomed for long periods, it might also appear, that these dogs do not shed. This because the dead hair, once fallen out, often gets caught in the curls and doesn't necessarily, drop off around the house.

This can apply to other breeds too. I rescued Collies for a while, years ago. The long coated dogs, seemed to actually shed a great deal less, than the smooths. This, purely because in the long coats, the dead hair would get caught up in the huge coats, rather than drop off. When brushed out however, it was obvious that there was a great deal of dead hair, in with the new. The worst coat I ever had to deal with though, was a smooth Collie. In spite of constant grooming, that girl left clouds of dead hair everywhere. People often get short haired breeds, thinking that shedding will be less or at least, they won't find hair all over the house. Not necessarily so. I shall always remember that Collie girl. Loved her, but oh that hair.

Lizzie
 

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Let me rephrase. It is true all dogs shed. Some dogs shed less than others. Non shed dogs often require daily grooming to keep excess hairs from matting their fur. Our dog is still a pup, but his hair is at least three inches long and I am still surprised how little fur comes off of him when I groom him. I grew up with lots of shedding animals -- I comb them like crazy, tons of fur came off, and still I had tumbleweeds after a few days. I totally loved them anyway but my son couldn't tolerate it.
 

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Yeah you have to pick your poison with dog hair. You either have a dog that sheds freely and you will have to sweep a lot or you have a dog who needs extra grooming and all that entails. My dog really doesn't shed a bunch if you are maintaining his coat. I never find tumbleweeds of dog hair...but I will find his undercoat starts pulling loose on a white t-shirt if I need to card/strip/or brush him. So if you don't want tumbleweeds that is possible, but you have to be ok with SOME shed hair and a pretty demanding grooming schedule. I pick the demanding grooming schedule, myself...I hate housework but I can sit on my butt and groom the dog LOL
 

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I'm afraid so, GDM. That and how designer dogs and mixed breeds are 'healthier' than purebreds.

So many myths about animals in general. Most especially, in dogs I think. Horses come a close second. Still, it all boils down to the fact, that most don't do enough homework, before jumping in.

Lizzie
 
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