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In 20 years of Collie breeding, I've never had a case of parvo because I take precautions. Bleach kills the parvovirus, so I clean all puppy areas with it daily. I allow no contact with strangers until the puppies have had at least one series of vaccines and I give them myself at home. I take my shoes off before entering the puppy room and wash my hands before handling them, which I do every day for socialization reasons and to move them while I clean their whelping box. The Vet office is where people take sick puppies and the virus can be acquired there.
 

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The Vet office is where people take sick puppies and the virus can be acquired there.
I agree with this, but also from what I understand, the first set of shots given that’s given at about 7-8 weeks, ends up piggy-backing onto the mothers remaining immunities. It’s like it’s redundant, the second & third sets are the critical ones.

My first dog had Parvo and survived, then when we got our current dog (it had been 7 months since the first one had it) and after I got conflicting reports about how long the virus stayed live – from 3 months to over a year. So I was worried the second one had gotten Parvo too as he wasn’t eating much, so I brought him in for a test, they asked that I wait in the car and then to carry the dog inside and hold him in my lap while inside.

Parvo gets transmit through their stools but also through their feet (which is where they sweat from).

Having gone through that with our first dog, I don’t ever want to go through that again – EVER!
 

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I am hoping to foster a few dogs rescued off the streets here in Bulgaria over the summer (I live in Bulgaria for 5 months a year) but am a little worried about the possible risks to my 3 dogs. My 3 were originally rescues and had all their puppy injections and get yearly rabies to allow us to travel around Europe as needed. But they have not had any boosters since the initial lot of vaccinations around 4 years ago. I don't tend to agree with yearly vaccinations, and have read in many places that if given as a puppy they get life long immunity or the jabs last minimum of 3, more likely 5 to 7 years.

My 3 are now around 4 to 5 years old and all healthy and never had any health issues. They do not tend to be fed much manufactured dog food except for dry biscuits as they get plenty of bones and I also make rice with meat and vegetables for them. They are treated for worms and have tick collars.

But many of the puppies rescued in Bulgaria often have Parvo. I understand it is fairly rare of adult healthy dogs to get this but is a possibility.

Any thoughts? Better to just get them all their boosters? How long after having their boosters do the become immune (if not already) - think I read somewhere it was usually around 14 days?
 

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Discussion Starter #66
and have read in many places that if given as a puppy they get life long immunity or the jabs last minimum of 3, more likely 5 to 7 years.
I don't agree with annual boosters either but I would not risk going longer than 3 years personally....

You can have a titer ran which is more expensive than the vaccine.

But many of the puppies rescued in Bulgaria often have Parvo. I understand it is fairly rare of adult healthy dogs to get this but is a possibility.
Yes it is a possibility. I would definitely discuss this with your vet and see what they say. I would definitely booster them, and then maybe just have a titer ran on each to be safe. I don't want to say once boostered they will be fine because I am not a vet and I don't want to give that kind of advice out :p
 

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This thread has now made me Paranoid being I just brought home our 8 1/2 week old Chessie.
I worried too Blanco...Fearghas didn't leave the backyard until two weeks after his final shots except to ride in the car.
He socialized only with dogs who were known to us and were up to date with their vaccines. Everyone washed thier hands before touching him. I may have seemed like an overprotective mam but he's healthy and happy!
This past weekend was his first foray into the world and he did great.
 

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We got Panda about 7-8 months after Hatchi had gotten Parvo. I’m not sure how long the virus stays alive but Panda had only gotten his first set of shots at 8 weeks and nothing since (we got him at over 5 months) so I was deathly worried he’d get parvo before he was able to get his completed set of shots. I even got him tested cuz he’d been vomiting and seemed to have no appetite.

He tested negative and I breathed a sigh of relief. It’s a horrible disease and I wouldn’t wish it on anyone – it’s also expensive to treat and I’m just happy that Hatchi survived and that Panda didn’t get it.

I just think that when people (especially dog newbies) get a new puppy, they aren’t told that the pup should stay inside until all his shots are up to date (but then again this means the puppy isn’t socialized until all his shots are up to date (like mine)
 

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I just think that when people (especially dog newbies) get a new puppy, they aren’t told that the pup should stay inside until all his shots are up to date (but then again this means the puppy isn’t socialized until all his shots are up to date (like mine)
We were told at the vets when we took him for his first shots. Mind you I had done enough research to choke a horse so I knew what to expect. After his second set he was allowed to socialize with known dogs.
Parvo is so so bad in our area. By his third set of shots I had to call the vets to ask if they had had any parvo dogs brought in because I can't carry him anymore. Thirty pounds of squirming pup is hard to hold on to!
 

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I have an 11 week old pup, Toby, who has made a recovery after parvo. I adopted him when he was 9 weeks old, he seems a little sluggish and did not want to eat, but would drink his water. Took him to a nearby vet who tested him...positive. He told me that he didn't really have a good chance to live, but referred me to an emergency vet. I didnt have a.couple grand for that, so I called the shelter where I got him. Was told two other pups from his litter tested as well, one collapsed and died before treatment. Toby went back to the shelters vet and he was back at home in 4 days. He's doing great and I think I am just now getting the bleach smell out of my nose!!
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Puppies can recover from parvo. One of my dogs who is now over 4 years old had Parvo. He was on a drip at the vets for a few days and then they said to take him home to die as little they could do. I syringe fed him for a couple of weeks and now he is a big, lovely dog.

We deal with Parvo all the time here in Bulgaria rescuing dogs from the streets and the municipality compound. We took 14 out of the compound a few month back, all had parvo. 9 died, but 5 survived and are all now healthy pups.
 

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what do most dog owners do for parvo or to prevent it? Does the vaccine prevent the virus? I have a lab/hound mix who had all the signs of parvo, not sure if she was vaccinated cause we rescued her. I am not a fan of getting "all the vaccines" at once, my vet wanted to give my dog like 4 vaccines in the same day. Anyway, I have a friend/neighbor who is not a vet but a doctor who told me to give Emma (my dog) these capsules. They were black and he said to give her 3 per day. She had been throwing up and very soft bowel movements, and all the other signs of parvo. After I gave her the capsules, she did better, in fact, the next day, most of her symptoms went away. Maybe I should get her vaccinated now though cause I take her to dog parks alot.
 

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Maybe they were charcoal pills? The vaccine does not have to be given yearly, in fact some titers say the average should be 3 yrs, some say longer. You can vaccinate her and then have a titer done to determine when you should revaccinate :)
 

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Parvovirus is a common and potentially serious viral disease in dogs. It is commonly known as Parvo. The virus can "adapt" over time, and other strains of the virus have appeared since then, but properly administered vaccinations are the best protection.

What are the signs seen with Parvovirus infection?
There are three main manifestations of Parvovirus infection:

1. Asymptomatic - No signs seen. Common in dogs over 1 year old and vaccinated dogs.
2. Cardiac - This form of the disease is much less common than the intestinal form due to widespread vaccination. Severe inflammation and necrosis (cell death), of the heart muscle causes breathing difficulty and death in very young (less than 8 weeks of age) puppies. Older dogs that survive this form have scarring in the heart muscle.
3. Intestinal - This virus causes extreme damage to the intestinal tract, causing sloughing of the cells that line the tract. This can leave the patient open to secondary bacterial infection. Most of the affected dogs (85%) are less than one year old and between 6-20 weeks old -- before the full set of vaccinations can be given. The death rate from infection is reported to be 16-35% in this age group.*
The intestinal signs include:

· Lethargy
· Vomiting
· Loss of appetite
· Diarrhea - usually bloody, and very foul-smelling (a characteristic odor, particular to Parvovirus infection)
· Intussusception - when a section of the inflamed intestinal tract telescopes into itself. This is an emergency.
· Fever
The onset of clinical signs is usually sudden, often 12 hours or less. The incubation from exposure to seeing the clinical signs varies from 3 to 10 days.

How is Parvovirus infection diagnosed?
This disease is diagnosed by physical examination, signalment (age, vaccination status, breed, etc.), and a fecal Parvo (ELISA) test. Additional diagnostics include blood work and radiographs. Dogs infected with Parvo typically have a low white count. Radiographs help rule out other potential causes for vomiting and diarrhea.
 

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My dog is a parvo survivor.

Her previous owner said that Maddie was 3-4 months old at the time and had gotten her first round of shots but not the subsequent ones when she contracted the disease. She was at the vet for 2 days and then was brought home because she couldn't afford to keep her at the vet any longer.

The owner said she herself spent the next several days changing Maddie's fluid bag every four hours, which was attached by IV to the back of Maddie's neck. Maddie had convulsions, bloody diarrhea - the works, and it looked grim for a while, but she pulled through.

When I got her (about 5 months ago) I took her to the vet, got all of her shots back up to date, plus her boosters. I had heard that parvo dogs can have cardiac problems later in life but I've seen no signs of heart trouble and today she's a happy, healthy, robust little dog.
 

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I am curious to know if this disease was not known until the 1970's, where did it come from? Is it a mutated virus? You see, I had dogs in the 1960,s and we only vaccinated against distemper and lepto, rabies and such. Suddenly this Varvo appeared out of nowhere. I am really curious about it because it is so deadly.
 

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It's an extremely small virus so it was only discovered and isolated relatively recently (60's).
 
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