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Is something I hear way too often from new and even long time dog owners. I think this is as important to know about as the flu in a newborn baby! Check with your vet to see if parvo is a problem in your area. It is a problem here and the vets do not always readily offer the advice or information SO ASK! Better safe then sorry, and your pet will love you for being informed!!!

Parvovirus attacks a dogs digestive system. Common symptoms include vomiting and diarrhea, which worsens as the disease begins to take over and can lead to blood cell count changes and bloody diarrhea. The major problem...dehydration. Vet care is necessary, whether left in their care or out patient care (you take care of them) but the vet will likely recommend the puppy stay there. They need fluids and many different medications to help cure this disease. If and only if you cannot afford treatment at the hospital make sure you follow instructions and bring the dog in frequently to the vet to be checked over.

*Always make sure a snap test is performed as vomiting and diarrhea can also be causes of other illnesses.*

Parvo can occur in any dog that is not vaccinated, normally attacking the young puppies!!!!! Puppies need a series of vaccines (DA2PP in most states) to protect them from this horrible disease. The other part of protection, is US the OWNER! Dogs not fully vaccinated should not be in areas which other dogs can touch. This includes but is not limited to common areas in apartments/housing communities, dog parks!, pet stores, and other peoples homes with unvaccinated dogs or frequently visiting dogs. Once your dog has been fully vaccinated it is up to you if you want to continue with yearly vaccines or have titers done to be sure your pets shots are still actively protecting them.

Parvo can live in an area for many years and is passed on through contaminated fecals. You can even track parvo on your shoes into your home so extra precausions are necessary until your new puppy is fully vaccinated (not the 1st but the 3rd or 4th depending on your vet). Also make sure visitors are washing their hands if they have a tendancy to touch strange dogs or visit parks or pets stores. People do it with their newborns (request you wash your hands) so why not do it with your puppy?

Please pass on this info as even if you do not have the disease in your area it can be brought in by a pet from an outside area. Again please check with your vet to see if your area has known Parvo cases and make sure your pet has its shots before introducing them to others!!
 

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great post pawz... i think this one should stick around ;)
 

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I used to work in a vet teaching hospital and I would see lots of dogs, puppies especially, come in with parvo. The lucky ones have owners who are willing to pay the expensive doctor bills to get them well, but even then they sometimes don't make it. The unlucky ones have (rather, had) owners who are unable/unwilling to pay to have them treated. I wonder if they were expecting that owning a dog would be cheap...
 

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i found this to be the best information about parvo. if the owners educate themselves they can know the signs before its too late. My pup lived thankfully.
Canine Parvovirus
 

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paws, I know you know best, but back last month when I was ultra-super parvo paranoid (and every hiccup she had, let alone her tummy might be upset because she decided people hair was tastier than steak or because I fed her junk food all day :rolleyes:, was an "OMG must scrub apartment," moment) I thought I had read that on average the symptoms appear 7 to 10 days after exposure which is why you wait 2 weeks until after the last shot cycle before releasing the little guys to the big big world. 1 week for the shot to kick in, and then another week in the case parvo symptoms appear (since during the week or so it takes for the shot to kick in they can theoretically still catch the virus and it wouldn't appear until 7 to 10 days after the last day of which their immune system has built up). Does it differ between dogs and breeds?

I mean that could be total hog-wash (why I ask...tee-hee), I also remember reading in places that vaccines do not guarantee safety against it and so never *ever* take your dog around animals you don't know (which may or may not be true (I mean :p I was vaccinated against measles as a kid, caught them when I was 29...remote things happen but they're so remote that it makes it sort of absurd to keep pets (or people) in a sterile bubble all of their lives) and if you do be very very scared (scare tactics for vaccinated doggies...yay :rolleyes:). I also remember reading that like black and tan breeds are more susceptible to catching it too, which seemed a bit off base and perhaps far fetched to me 'cause, well, like doxies, they have black and tan variations but it's the same breed of dog, heck two colors could be from the same litter. I have no clue if that was accurate or not though since it didn't really apply to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I know you know best
Everything I put on here is from personal experience only, by no means have I been to vet school nor training school :)

I thought I had read that on average the symptoms appear 7 to 10 days after exposure which is why you wait 2 weeks until after the last shot cycle before releasing the little guys to the big big world. 1 week for the shot to kick in, and then another week in the case parvo symptoms appear
This is not set in stone. I have always recommended people wait 3-4 weeks, not 2. The vets I work for of course tell owners the average on when symptoms occur, but the average is not always correct either ;) I worked at clinic where a dog was tested for Parvo because one of the neighbors dogs who was in their yard came down with it, the dog tested positive for parvo but NEVER showed a symptom, this is rare, but its always worth mentioning.

Does it differ between dogs and breeds?
I dont know how valid this is anymore, but yes it used to be that black dogs were more susceptible to parvo and I think there were breeds that were listed, but I think the breed thing is b/c of those types of people who own that breed...if you get my drift.
 

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We got a puppy that had Parvo already, when we got it. We didn't know anything about Parvo. We had never had any dogs that had it or had been around anybody that had experienced it. So when our puppy got sick. We took it to the vet. Because I use the BARF diet she said it was Salmonella. She did not give our puppy the Parvo test. She gave me meds for Salmonella. We went home. He didn't seem to improve. Then he got sicker. We rushed him to the emergency night vet, a different vet. The first thing she did was to take a Parvo test and said he had Parvo. Our puppy fought for his life for almost a week, but ended up dying. I'm telling this so that people will be sure to have their vets take a Parvo test when your puppy gets sick. I have since learned a lot about Parvo. I wished I had known about it before our sweet little puppy died. Thank you for telling everybody about it. Yes the cost is a lot and we are still paying on the bill, but that doesn't matter, we wish our puppy had survived.
 

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I am so sorry for your loss :( I hope you called the original vet and told her a little somethin somethin that cannot be repeated here. Its so prominent where I live and it breaks my heart. Thank you for sharing your story and ty for doing your best (and please know you did!) The second your pup became ill
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We did and we complained to the administrator and told him we weren't satisfied with her care of our puppy and wanted another vet to take over. They wouldn't do that. So we refused to pay the $45. that she charged us for the initial examination. They didn't make us pay that. We were thinking of going to the state board. But that wouldn't bring our puppy back.
 

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:( so sorry for your loss... that is a terrible story... :mad:

thank you for sharing it with us tho, hopefully someone will learn from it...

We were thinking of going to the state board. But that wouldn't bring our puppy back.
i agree, that wouldn't bring your puppy back, but it may help prevent this from happening again... just something to think about...
 

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We did think about that.We thought a long time on it. But we are on limited income and knew we couldn't afford an attorney. So we tell everybody we know that has a dog to always get a Parvo test. We hope we can help that way at least
 

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We did think about that.We thought a long time on it. But we are on limited income and knew we couldn't afford an attorney. So we tell everybody we know that has a dog to always get a Parvo test. We hope we can help that way at least
ah... i didn't realize that it was as complicated as that, i thought it was just making a complaint... i totally understand, and thank you again for sharing your experience here...
 

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Actually, the state board would be VERY happy to hear your complaint, and you don't need an attorney to file one - this is not a lawsuit, just a formal complaint that will be investigated. I deal with both pharmacy and medical boards on a daily basis, and believe me (I'm on the defendant side), they will investigate your complaint. If they find something out of whack (malpractice, negligence, etc), they will act accordingly of their own behalf.

The complaint is merely an indicator for them to do their own research.

Not trying to push for it, but I'd hate to see you walk away with a feeling of helplessness or a feeling that the vet is not practicing appropriately and not think you have any recourse.

Happy to talk further about it if you'd like...not sure if you're in the states or not, but that's my professional experience here (I deal with all 50 state Boards of Pharmacy regularly)
 
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