Dog Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,881 Posts
Great article!

Before I adopted Sophie I actually was very interested in a litter of 5 week old mixed breed puppies at a local rescue. I saw the petfinder posting on Monday, called Tuesday saying I was interested and was told they only had one left that had a hold on him. The rest were gone. Not just placed under hold, but physically given away. I mentioned that the pups were only five weeks old and the ad itself said they wouldn't be ready for three weeks and was told they found good homes and it's first come first serve. They only required a valid ID and at least 18 years old to adopt.

It wasn't so bad as I did end up getting my Sophie instead but there sure are some questionable rescues out there! This particular one is still in business, no idea if their practices have changed or not.
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,661 Posts
Great article!

Before I adopted Sophie I actually was very interested in a litter of 5 week old mixed breed puppies at a local rescue. I saw the petfinder posting on Monday, called Tuesday saying I was interested and was told they only had one left that had a hold on him. The rest were gone. Not just placed under hold, but physically given away. I mentioned that the pups were only five weeks old and the ad itself said they wouldn't be ready for three weeks and was told they found good homes and it's first come first serve. They only required a valid ID and at least 18 years old to adopt.

It wasn't so bad as I did end up getting my Sophie instead but there sure are some questionable rescues out there! This particular one is still in business, no idea if their practices have changed or not.
Posted via Mobile Device
Sounds very similar to my local shelter. I could, theoretically, walk in right now, point at a dog and so long as it wasn't on "hold" or waiting to be reunited with it's owner, I could walk out with pup in hand. Not exactly the best method to adopting pets to people...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,189 Posts
With hundreds of thousands of dogs sacrificed on a daily basis around the world I find it really hard to get worked up about these insufficiently good rescues re-homing dogs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,468 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
One of my reasons for posting this article is have a resource for prospective first-time dog owners to help them determine which rescues will set them and their new dogs up for success. More experienced dog owners are able to walk into a public shelter and decide for themselves which dogs will best fit their households. I know that I would have benefited from more guidance with the adoption of my first dog, which I subsequently rehomed.

Also, where I live (southern California), we have a plethora of rescues, and unfortunately, there are a fair number of dog "flippers," who cash in on the pledges well-meaning folks make to get dogs out of high kill shelters. Then the dogs end up being dumped elsewhere.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,881 Posts
With hundreds of thousands of dogs sacrificed on a daily basis around the world I find it really hard to get worked up about these insufficiently good rescues re-homing dogs.
I wouldn't have cared in my case if the puppies weren't so young AND if the rescue hadn't said they were waiting until 8 weeks to adopt them out and then passed them out at 5 weeks anyway.

I don't personally hold pounds and shelters to quite as high of a standard as rescues - to me, people elect to go into rescue so they (should) elect to do a better job than a pound. However, my Sophie came from a pound and while it wasn't super difficult to adopt her they did far more screening than this other rescue did.
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,189 Posts
@PoppyKenna

I understand the concern for the 5 wk puppies, that's definitely early but since it's a rescue, my mind immediately goes to: early adoption vs euthanasia or early adoption vs turned out on the streets.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,468 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
[MENTION=76170]

I understand the concern for the 5 wk puppies, that's definitely early but since it's a rescue, my mind immediately goes to: early adoption vs euthanasia or early adoption vs turned out on the streets.
I don't think a rescue group should take possession of puppies if they are not willing to care for them until they are eight weeks old. Plus, I assume that rescue was asking prospective adopters to pay a fee for the puppies, which should have been enough to cover their care for an additional three weeks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,798 Posts
Some real rescues will be a little flexible in their policies.

The one I got Jaya from, usually required a home inspection. But as I live 600 miles away, we worked out another solution.

I offered to send them photos and/or see if someone from my local shelter could come in and inspect my place for them. I also told them that my vet has been to my home a number of time to put to sleep elderly pets I owned in the past - and if they talked to her, she could reassure them that my home was fine for dogs.

The rescue allowed me to send photos of my yard, fencing, and the interior of my home. I think too, that me suggesting they contact my vet and/or humane society for a report on my home...that helped to show I wasn't trying to hide anything from them. I'm pretty sure thought that they talked with my vet about not only the vet care my prior animals had, but also about my home.

My vet has been in my back yard too. She helped to carry some of my larger pets bodies out to their graves. So she knew what my back yard looked like and the kind of fencing I had. And, I know my humane society would have gladly sent someone over to do an inspection if it meant a dog was going to find a nice home...even if the dog didn't come from their shelter.

Living in a small town has those kind of advantages...it might be harder to do living in a city where a local shelter might not want to use personnel to do home inspections for another organization.

Also, with Jaya, the rescue org reduced her adoption fee, given she was an older dog (age 5) and a special needs dog...in that she was almost feral. I paid $75 for her...and that mostly covered her spay fee. The organization absorbed the rest of her 3 months of upkeep...which included food, and other vet services...such as shots and check ups.

Otherwise to defray the cost of all that most of the dogs they adopt out are around $150 to $250. They were just happy to see a dog that was going to be very difficult to place, find a good home and gave me a break on the fee for taking her in. I was very surprised at how generous they were, as I never asked for a discount...and they really didn't have to give me one.

Also, a few weeks after I got Jaya, my vet got paperwork from the rescue org's vet showing what all was done with Jaya while in the care of the adoption organization - my vet called me to let me know. Then a few days later, I got a copy of the same paper work from their vet too.

So, they fudged the rules a little in letting me have Jaya without they themselves doing a home inspection...but I still think they did some calling and checked up on me with my vet and maybe even with the local animal shelter, as I had adopted pets from them in the past.

Stormy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,646 Posts
@PoppyKenna

I understand the concern for the 5 wk puppies, that's definitely early but since it's a rescue, my mind immediately goes to: early adoption vs euthanasia or early adoption vs turned out on the streets.
The puppies were at a rescue though, most rescues foster out young puppies till they or at least 7 or 8 weeks old, in fact in some areas it's illegal to adopt out such young puppies. Most rescues will not euthanize unless it's absolutely necessary and that's usually due to behavioral issues. Their adopting out such young puppies makes me wonder what else that rescue is doing that's wrong. Is it over crowded? Are the animals taken to the vet? How clean are the kennels?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,881 Posts
@Rain - the rescue itself has grown in popularity so may be totally different now. At the time it was run out of the person's home and they essentially just had whatever dogs they had living with them while they adopted them out (funnily enough, usually puppies).

There are a few actual shelters in the area that don't euthanize, especially puppies, so it was not a life or death situation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
880 Posts
As a first dog Trucker could have gone disastrously wrong, I got lucky. I think that even though I didn't meet some of the requirements (I worked a fully 8 hour day), they felt that I really was willing to go the extra mile and do what I had to for my dog (I had waited 6 months to meet him at this point).

This was a good article. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,481 Posts
The puppies were at a rescue though, most rescues foster out young puppies till they or at least 7 or 8 weeks old, in fact in some areas it's illegal to adopt out such young puppies. Most rescues will not euthanize unless it's absolutely necessary and that's usually due to behavioral issues. Their adopting out such young puppies makes me wonder what else that rescue is doing that's wrong. Is it over crowded? Are the animals taken to the vet? How clean are the kennels?
Not even old enough to have been vaccinated.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top