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So I've posted a few times about Delilah's anxiety/reactivity, focus, and possibly OCD issues.

Instead of continuing with agility, I'm going to use the money for either a private lesson with my agility trainer (to work on focus/drive) and/or a consult with a veterinary behaviorist (to work on all of her issues).

Something I'm worried about is that she won't misbehave when the professional comes over to evaluate her.

When I brought her to the vet he said there didn't seem to be anything wrong with her, and just gave me some natural calming chews (which seem to have made a tiny difference with her anxiety but nothing significant). He didn't seem to believe me about the OCD.

I work at a dog daycare and there are two trainers there. When I have trouble with a dog in my group I'll occasionally ask for their help and as soon as they step into the group the dog stops misbehaving and just goes and lies down. It must be something in their body language/movement/whatever. But then they never see anything wrong and can't give me specific help.

I'm worried that if the professional I hire is like those, Delilah won't display any of her issues, and they'll think I'm exaggerating and there's nothing wrong. Or they'll believe me but won't be able to give me any specific advice for her case without witnessing it. And then I'll have paid for something that didn't help.

One of the trainers at work has told me about some of his consults and he's like "I went over and there was nothing wrong with the dog! The owner insists there is, but I think the owner's just seeing things that aren't there." But I'm not so sure, because I've seen awful dogs just behave around him.

Is this something common with professional trainers/behaviorists? Has anyone else ever had this issue with professionals? If someone "has a way" with dogs, could that actually not be helpful to solving the problem?
 

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Well...my boy always misbehaves, so no problem there. ;) Although my old vet did tell me that he was "perfectly fine"!

It may be helpful to have lots of video recordings at the ready, and good, detailed notes about her behavior. When it started, how/if it's changed, what triggers it, etc. Mention any other anxieties as well, as anxiety and OCD can often be interlinked.

Also, see if you can meet in a place or travel to a place where the behavior may present itself. With my boy, that's anytime and anywhere. You may need to be a little more specific.

Just be sure to go with someone who has good reviews. I shelled out $250 for a consult + 2 additional training sessions with a woman who is a crackpot. I didn't continue after that initial session, so money wasted. She didn't have any reviews online so I just took a chance. I actually got to see her in a coffee shop the other day and deliberately avoided her while she started daggers at me. She didn't like me either, haha.

Best of luck!!
 

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Is this something common with professional trainers/behaviorists? Has anyone else ever had this issue with professionals? If someone "has a way" with dogs, could that actually not be helpful to solving the problem?
People that have a "way" with dogs and happen to be strangers and/or trainers many times have a distinct advantage over a customer's dog. The trainer, for starters, is an unknown entity to the particular dog and has the dog off balance so to speak. I have seen dogs not exhibit the undesirable behavior in these circumstances because the dog is trying to figure the human out first at a more basic level and can be preoccupied with that task. Plus, if the trainer asserts themselves in a fashion the dog is not accustomed to, certain behaviors are not demonstrated as per usual. Dog trainers know this and take advantage of this. However, it should be "helpful" as you have a wonderful example in front of your eyes that the dog does have the capacity to operate in a more desirable fashion. It can be humbling to many a dog owner at times.
 

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So I've posted a few times about Delilah's anxiety/reactivity, focus, and possibly OCD issues.

Instead of continuing with agility, I'm going to use the money for either a private lesson with my agility trainer (to work on focus/drive) and/or a consult with a veterinary behaviorist (to work on all of her issues).

Something I'm worried about is that she won't misbehave when the professional comes over to evaluate her.

When I brought her to the vet he said there didn't seem to be anything wrong with her, and just gave me some natural calming chews (which seem to have made a tiny difference with her anxiety but nothing significant). He didn't seem to believe me about the OCD.

I work at a dog daycare and there are two trainers there. When I have trouble with a dog in my group I'll occasionally ask for their help and as soon as they step into the group the dog stops misbehaving and just goes and lies down. It must be something in their body language/movement/whatever. But then they never see anything wrong and can't give me specific help.

I'm worried that if the professional I hire is like those, Delilah won't display any of her issues, and they'll think I'm exaggerating and there's nothing wrong. Or they'll believe me but won't be able to give me any specific advice for her case without witnessing it. And then I'll have paid for something that didn't help.

One of the trainers at work has told me about some of his consults and he's like "I went over and there was nothing wrong with the dog! The owner insists there is, but I think the owner's just seeing things that aren't there." But I'm not so sure, because I've seen awful dogs just behave around him.

Is this something common with professional trainers/behaviorists? Has anyone else ever had this issue with professionals? If someone "has a way" with dogs, could that actually not be helpful to solving the problem?
Your dog is misbehaving, there may be many reasons, some of them are given
  1. lack of training.
  2. lack of exercise.
  3. lack of nutrition.
  4. Boredom. (not having a partner dog or lonely for a long time in a day)
  5. canine anxiety.
  6. lack of sleep(rare)
These are the basic reasons why your dog misbehaves with you or your family members, friends & neighbors. A few years ago i also had this problem, my dog (named jimmy) used to bark at my neighbors and some of my friends. my dog was physically inactive. then I went to the nearest vet but the problem was not resolved, I also hired a pet trainer who charged me $70/day but nothing works. there was a time that I regret about having a dog at all. And then an old friend of mine discovered a course for dogs which I think it may work, but it was better than my expectation! my dog not only became well behaved he begin to follow my all commands like (“sit”,” run”,” come here jimmy”, etc). after months we together went for hiking and jimmy cooperated with me very well, it was an amazing trip. he became so well behaved, interactive & obedient that I never expected. I’m glad that I got jimmy now we are best friends.
If you can relate from this story and your dog isn’t well behaved then you should try this course (here is the link- http://bit.ly/2YMzFt9 ) I can assure you won’t regret
just copy and paste this link on your browser if it’s not working.
Have a nice evening with your fellow met.:)
 
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