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I have a fairly new fur buddy and I've been having issues housebreaking her. A huge concern of mine is that I hopefully (fingers crosses) will be getting a new job and unlike before, I will be gone at least 9 hours during the day. I don't expect my little one to hold her bladder for that long. I know she could, if she needed to (she's done it before) however, I'm trying to figure out what people do with their pets while they're gone at work so long? Not only will she pee and poop, which I never get mad at her for, I mean, I can't hold my blatter for 9 hours, but she also has separation anxiety and will chew ANYTHING she can get her teeth on.

I've tried to research wee pads, or the synthetic potty grass and I don't mind buying that if I can get her to use it. I'm just worried she will think she should only go on the fake grass and won't go outside in the mornings before work when I take her. I have a crate that she isn't super fond of and I use it sometimes. I used to use it at night because she would wake up around 3-4 AM while I was asleep and pee and poop, so I put her in the crate at night and that fixed that problem. I could use the same logic for when I am at work, but I do NOT want to leave her in a crate for 9 hours.

What do you do when you're gone at work? Do you think my wee pad idea is the best scenario? At the end of the day, I'd rather her go on something I can wash as opposed to my carpet. :thumbsup:
 

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Currently I'm only working part time and my mom is on WCB, so I have a built in puppy sitter. When we both go back to work (hopefully I'll et a full time job!) I plan to take Tessa to a better researched doggie daycare a couple days a week. I also will be coming home at lunch to let her out. If that's not feasible for you, then you could always look into a dog walker, or a neighbourhood kid to come over after school to walk your pup (their rates are usually cheaper ;)).
 

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Hi Bones,

My partner and I both work full time (out from 7.30am till 4.30pm) and we leave our 3 month old pup in a designated area (laundry and long hallway all tiles) during the day. She is paper trained and has food, water, bed, radio and millions of toys with her. Then each night I clean up the paper and put fresh stuff down for the next day. This could also work with the pee pads. She still goes fine on the grass in the back yard every morning and during the afternoons when we are home.

She's even getting to the point where she walks towards the back door and looks at us to let us know she wants to go outside. This is with the door to the laundry open and the paper still on the floor. during the afternoon and evening when we're home I take her out to the grass on a regular basis or whenever she lets me know so I think this also reinforces where the 'potty' is.

Hope this helps :)
 

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For a dog with separation anxiety, who will chew things when left alone, I really would recommend using a crate as long - as she's well acclimated to it - or confining her to an area that is dog-proofed (e.g., a mudroom, bathroom, kitchen, etc.)

This is not to say you should crate her for 9 hours straight of course. You should hire a dog walker or go home on your lunch break to take her out. If that isn't possible, confine her to a smaller area.

Also, if she is going to chew anything she can get her teeth on, isn't she going to chew wee wee pads, fake grass, etc? If so, I wouldn't use those tools; if you are worried about her having accidents, can you leave her in an area that has tiled floors (i.e., easy to clean)?

If she is going to the bathroom while you are away from home, it may be a symptom of anxiety, but it could also mean she is not 100% housebroken (in my dog it seemed to be a combination). I understand that you don't expect her to hold it for 9 hours, and I also agree that it is not fair to ask her to hold it for 9 hours every day...however an adult, housebroken dog with no health issues will. The fact that she was going to the bathroom in the house while you were sleeping also indicates that she is probably not completely housebroken (this is assuming that she does not have health issues, so a vet check up may be in order if you suspect this could be the case).

I didn't want to use a crate either, but in the end it was a life saver for my dog, who had issues that sound very similar to yours. Again, I would never leave a dog crated for more than 3-4 hours at a time, but even just a 20 minute walk midday would be an ideal solution. I was fortunate to live very close to work, so I always just went home on my lunch break to take her out (I still do, even though I live farther away, and she no longer needs the crate), but if you are unable to do that, I would seriously consider hiring a dog walker or seeing if a neighbor, family member, or friend would be willing to help you out with that.
 

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Hi Bones,

My puppy was the first dog I owned, and she had boredom and separation anxiety issues as well. For the first 7 months I had her, she was used to going in her crate since she came from a shelter, so I put her crate training on hold and got her a larger exercise pen that was about 3 feet high. In one end of the rectangular pen, was her potty pad holder, on the other then was her bedding, and the middle was her play area. Like yours, my puppy chewed up everything when I wasn't home, including her puppy pads (soiled or not). She went through about 5 dog beds, 3 puppy pad holders, and countless toys. What finally helped was leaving the radio on and giving her a treat stuffed Kong on my way out the door to distract her from me leaving.

As for the potty training, she was always pretty good about going on the pads once she figured out that was where I wanted her to go. To stop her from chewing them, I got an Iris puppy pad holder that had a protective plastic grate that goes above the pad so they can't reach it. This worked until she figured out how to OPEN the pad holder and get to the pad inside. I eventually ended up having to drill holes through the pad holder near the latches and screwing them together so she couldn't open it.

She has no problems going outside at all, and I think she prefers it. Now that she is no longer confined to her pen (she has free run of the living room and kitchen now at 11 months old), I have a vinyl mat and the Potty Patch (fake grass pad holder) that she uses when she can't go outside during the day. She's been doing well on that so far, though she occasionally misses. The vinyl mat protects the carpet, so no worries there. She'd much rather go outside I'm sure, but as of yet, I haven't been able to train her to let me know when she wants out. I'm frequently out of the house between 6-9 hours a day, occasionally longer, and I've yet to come home to a mess unless I left something out I shouldn't have (paper towels, etc.)
 
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