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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Here is me and my lifestyle:

- I'm sort of lazy but I like to do active things with a dog.
- I'm not very strong so tough strong dogs isn't for me.
- I'm 13 so something that isn't a malinois preferably
- I have experience with fearful, deaf and reactive dogs
- I train using R+ and -P

What I want in a dog:

- Between 15 - 60 lbs
- Velcro dog is a must
- Prefer the dog to not hate people, but not love them either
- Suitable for sports
- Energy Level doesn't matter
- Willing to work, least stubborn as possible

My house/neighborhood:

- Quiet neighborhood
- Dog park 40 mins away walking
- no parks
- trails
- some open grass areas but not many
- small backyard
 

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I find it strange you specifically mentioned no Malinois. Was there a reason for that? Also since you said you're kind of lazy I would say energy level does matter. You're better off with a moderate to low energy dog.

And you're 13 years old? That's young and you have to consider what will happen to your dog if you go to college. Will your parents care for it? Since you're probably at school all day too you should get an adult dog and not a puppy unless someone will be home to care for it.

Personally I think you could bring this description to a shelter and they might help you out. I would say most working and herding breeds wouldn't be a good fit, and since you don't want a strong dog probably not a bully breed. A Beagle might be a good fit. They're smaller, often moderate to low energy, cuddly and enjoy walks in the woods. They're stubborn and can listen to their nose more than people but they respond well to food. You might find some terriers (not a JRT, too hyper) might fit as well. Otherwise you could just find a nice mutt that suits you.
 

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how many hours are you planning to spent training, walking and exercising your dog every day?

You said your dog should be velcro.
velcro dogs often have bigger problems with staying alone without their attachment figure around.
Some of them suffer from being alone too much.
How many hours has the dog to be alone every day?

A dog can live up to 15-18 years. If you can't care for it because of school or further education, are your parents or other family members willing and able to care every day for the dog?

without knowing more about you, I'd say have a look at the breeds in the group 9 of the FCI (google!).
there are a lot of nice, vecro companion dogs, that don't need massive amounts of excercise.
I also second going to a shelter.
there's a surprisingly big number of cute small breeds in need of a home.
 

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Different breeds of dogs have different needs behaviors and characteristics and you need to choose a breed that you and your family are capable of taking care of. The most important thing to consider before selecting a breed of dog is potential health problems. It might be a good idea to make a chart with the characteristics you want in a dog across the top and different breeds of dog listed vertically on the side. Finding information about dog breeds is easy - just look for websites that cover dog-related topics and you will find pictures and descriptions readily available. Off the top of my head a handful or so of breeds come to mind based on your description of a dog that’s medium-sized around 40 lbs. low-med energy not a ton of maintenance and relatively healthy:

Australian Shepherd
English Bull Terrier
Spaniels
Beagle
Portuguese Water Dog
Schnauzer

You seem like a very mature 13 year old and you’re clearly well-spoken and articulate beyond your years but… You’re still a kid and you’re going to want to do kid stuff and not worry about playing mom to a dog that’s sick or not adjusting well. So I’m giving you some homework, a questionnaire to complete a list of dog breeds and their health issues to learn about and a dog breed selector from AKC. This should help you get off to a good start and make the right decision for you and also for the dog.

https://www.petinsuranceu.com/dog-breeds/
Dog Breed Selector - What Kind Of Dog Should I Get? - American Kennel Club
 

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@Cherrycurry I'm sorry but Australian Sheperds are not medium energy! They're definitely high energy and high maintenance. I do not think that breed would be a good fit. And if the OP wants a dog that's not strong Bull Terriers would be out. They're like come headed bull dozers. When I worked at a shelter two of the hardest dogs to walk were Bull terrier mixes.
 

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I agree, if you're not looking to actively work your Aussie every day, don't get one. Is anyone home during the day? If not, 8 hours of you being in school is a long time for an Aussie, so you'd be better be willing to do something before and after school.
Also, they may not be considered a "strong" dog, but you might reconsider that if they see something to chase. When my Aussie was about 9 months old, he jerked after a squirrel that ran very close to him, and very nearly pulled me over. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I find it strange you specifically mentioned no Malinois. Was there a reason for that? Also since you said you're kind of lazy I would say energy level does matter. You're better off with a moderate to low energy dog.

And you're 13 years old? That's young and you have to consider what will happen to your dog if you go to college. Will your parents care for it? Since you're probably at school all day too you should get an adult dog and not a puppy unless someone will be home to care for it.

Personally I think you could bring this description to a shelter and they might help you out. I would say most working and herding breeds wouldn't be a good fit, and since you don't want a strong dog probably not a bully breed. A Beagle might be a good fit. They're smaller, often moderate to low energy, cuddly and enjoy walks in the woods. They're stubborn and can listen to their nose more than people but they respond well to food. You might find some terriers (not a JRT, too hyper) might fit as well. Otherwise you could just find a nice mutt that suits you.
I said no malinois as an example of a breed I wouldn't be able to handle. Their drive, energy level, etc. is too much for me to handle.

I might not go to collage/university but if I do, there are tons of universities close by that have what I want to do so that wouldn't be an issue. If I for some reason had to go away, I would find a way to bring my dog or my parents would care for it until I get back.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
how many hours are you planning to spent training, walking and exercising your dog every day?

You said your dog should be velcro.
velcro dogs often have bigger problems with staying alone without their attachment figure around.
Some of them suffer from being alone too much.
How many hours has the dog to be alone every day?

A dog can live up to 15-18 years. If you can't care for it because of school or further education, are your parents or other family members willing and able to care every day for the dog?

without knowing more about you, I'd say have a look at the breeds in the group 9 of the FCI (google!).
there are a lot of nice, vecro companion dogs, that don't need massive amounts of excercise.
I also second going to a shelter.
there's a surprisingly big number of cute small breeds in need of a home.
Training: Probably 15 - 1 hr per day. It depends on how much homework I have, if I'm home all day, etc.

Walking: anywhere from 30 mins - 1 hr

The dog would be away from me for 6 hrs for school but alone 1 hr because my dad is home until 2 pm. I get home at 3. I can also go home at lunch and walk the dog for about 30 mins before heading back off to school.


If I end up going off to school far away (which is a small chance), I would find a way to bring the dog or my parents would care for it until I can come home.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Different breeds of dogs have different needs behaviors and characteristics and you need to choose a breed that you and your family are capable of taking care of. The most important thing to consider before selecting a breed of dog is potential health problems. It might be a good idea to make a chart with the characteristics you want in a dog across the top and different breeds of dog listed vertically on the side. Finding information about dog breeds is easy - just look for websites that cover dog-related topics and you will find pictures and descriptions readily available. Off the top of my head a handful or so of breeds come to mind based on your description of a dog that’s medium-sized around 40 lbs. low-med energy not a ton of maintenance and relatively healthy:

Australian Shepherd
English Bull Terrier
Spaniels
Beagle
Portuguese Water Dog
Schnauzer

You seem like a very mature 13 year old and you’re clearly well-spoken and articulate beyond your years but… You’re still a kid and you’re going to want to do kid stuff and not worry about playing mom to a dog that’s sick or not adjusting well. So I’m giving you some homework, a questionnaire to complete a list of dog breeds and their health issues to learn about and a dog breed selector from AKC. This should help you get off to a good start and make the right decision for you and also for the dog.

https://www.petinsuranceu.com/dog-breeds/
Dog Breed Selector - What Kind Of Dog Should I Get? - American Kennel Club
Thank you :)

My plan for vet bills is to save $5-$10 every allowance ($25 every 2 weeks) and 10%-15% of large amounts I get (christmas/birthday money, etc)
 

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Honestly, at your age and some of the things going on you have shared in other threads, I don't think getting a dog on your own is the best idea.

You're too young to have a job and reliable income or your own transportation. You are still in school, not even through middle school I would guess based on your age. Your future plans are likely to change multiple times before you even graduate high school. Honestly any pet you get should be a family pet at this point in your life. Sure, you can be the primary caregiver (feed, train, walk, etc.) BUT breed choice ultimately (if your family does add a dog) should be what your parents want and feasibly can provide for as they would be the ones actually taking ownership and responsibility.
 

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A lot of people are mentioning your age and that you have a lot of opportunities when you get older. That is true, so why not consider a middle aged or senior dog to adopt? Plenty of them are still active and enjoy going out on hikes and walks. That would enable you to enjoy a dog throughout the rest of your teenage years and (not to sound callous but..) then when you were around 18-20 the dog would probably pass away and you would be able to pursue college, travel, careers, etc. And of course adopting an older dog can be great in terms of giving a dog a home, and many of them are experienced pets.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
A lot of people are mentioning your age and that you have a lot of opportunities when you get older. That is true, so why not consider a middle aged or senior dog to adopt? Plenty of them are still active and enjoy going out on hikes and walks. That would enable you to enjoy a dog throughout the rest of your teenage years and (not to sound callous but..) then when you were around 18-20 the dog would probably pass away and you would be able to pursue college, travel, careers, etc. And of course adopting an older dog can be great in terms of giving a dog a home, and many of them are experienced pets.
The only problem is that senior dogs cannot do agility which is one of the main reasons I want another dog. I can do agility with a dog that's older but it wouldn't be doing agility for that long.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
A lot of people are mentioning your age and that you have a lot of opportunities when you get older. That is true, so why not consider a middle aged or senior dog to adopt? Plenty of them are still active and enjoy going out on hikes and walks. That would enable you to enjoy a dog throughout the rest of your teenage years and (not to sound callous but..) then when you were around 18-20 the dog would probably pass away and you would be able to pursue college, travel, careers, etc. And of course adopting an older dog can be great in terms of giving a dog a home, and many of them are experienced pets.
I can definitely look into a dog that's around 1-2 years because that's when you're supposed to start training. I can't start a tiny puppy in agility because of their growth plates. They close fully around 12-18 months.
 

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Well you shouldn't be getting a dog that's a puppy anyway since you can't stay home with them. I think a Beagle or Spaniel of some sort would be a good fit. There are always loads of Beagles for adoption and plenty of Spaniels too. And personally I think a dog that's 2-4 might be a bit better too. They're over that crazy teenage phase and have a settled personality. They're physically in the prime of their lives too.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Well you shouldn't be getting a dog that's a puppy anyway since you can't stay home with them. I think a Beagle or Spaniel of some sort would be a good fit. There are always loads of Beagles for adoption and plenty of Spaniels too. And personally I think a dog that's 2-4 might be a bit better too. They're over that crazy teenage phase and have a settled personality. They're physically in the prime of their lives too.
My dad is home all day. The dog would only stay home alone for an hour each day.
 

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I'm always suggesting low energy breeds because most people are so excited and totally plan on exercising the dog but end up not meeting their requirements. It's not easy planning your day around a dog, and over time the dog gets left at the house more and more.
If you don't meet their exercise requirements a dog will become destructive.
I'm willing to bet money the families who adopted dexters litter mates (kelpies) don't exercise nearly enough. Not many people can keep up that schedule, unless they own a farm or something.
I suggest something in the greyhound family. Greyhounds are fast but lazy. They're notoriously quite and definitely one person shadow dogs. Usually friendly with other dogs but socializing with people is important with them. They're cos needs minimal attention and they can range from small to large depending on the specific breed, like whippets are smaller. And they're totally love bugs
 

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I'm always suggesting low energy breeds because most people are so excited and totally plan on exercising the dog but end up not meeting their requirements. It's not easy planning your day around a dog, and over time the dog gets left at the house more and more.
If you don't meet their exercise requirements a dog will become destructive.
I'm willing to bet money the families who adopted dexters litter mates (kelpies) don't exercise nearly enough. Not many people can keep up that schedule, unless they own a farm or something.
I suggest something in the greyhound family. Greyhounds are fast but lazy. They're notoriously quite and definitely one person shadow dogs. Usually friendly with other dogs but socializing with people is important with them. They're cos needs minimal attention and they can range from small to large depending on the specific breed, like whippets are smaller. And they're totally love bugs.
 

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Though honestly because of your age I'd hope your parents are very involved. Don't plan on raising and bonding with a dog if you're just going to leave it when your life hits that point. He will be so sad and confused.
 
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