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Discussion Starter #1
With my new 8 week old Blue Heeler, I'm having a few...frustration issues. The one at the moment is my poor kitty, Milo. Milo is a 20 lbs maine coone/british short hair and is, for now, taller and bigger than Applejack's 5 lbs.

For her part, Milo is behaving admirably to Applejack. She tolerates being licked on the head, kicked off her bed, chased and run over with extreme paitences, with only a few clawless swats and minor growling. Usually at this point I try and distract AJ with one of her own toys before things can escalate.

Lately, though, this hasn't been working. Applejack won't leave Milo alone no matter what distraction I try to employ, and Milo is losing her cool-- has even nipped AJ's ear hard enough for a yip. My husband doesn't like the cat, and I'm worried Milo's behavior toward the puppy might set him off. Any suggestions on how to help my puppy lose interest in the cat?
 

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Cats do best in high places so esp when dogs are involved, one cat tree isn't enough. Try to make sure she has a place she can jump onto and hangout in every room she is allowed. Also, consider designating one cat only room so she can have breaks.

as far as pup goes, start working on leave it and recall but don't bother using them with the cat at this early stage. (Too much distraction, won't likely be able to listen.) In the meantime, use management techniques: gates, separate rooms, drag a leash (when your home) n and separate when you are not supervising/home.
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Discussion Starter #5
We live in a two room apartment, and Milo isn't allowed in the bedroom because hubby is allergic. So seperating them by room isn't really a viable option, but thank you.

So far Applejack has reacted badly to both leash and crates. We're still working on it though. I've never successfully taught a dog 'leave it' but I'm working on learning how.
 

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There is a thread in training called helpful videos. There should be a tutorial on it. :)
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Discussion Starter #8
She whines when I put it on, refuses to go potty with it on, and on walks tries to hide under my feet the whole time. It is difficult not to step on her! I know what to do with a pulling dog, but one that hides I'm not at all sure.
 

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Have you tried clicker training? I could NOT get Jayne to stop chasing the cats when she was a puppy, then I started using the clicker. I'd click and treat for her looking at the cat and not doing anything, I'd click and treat when the cat was able to move without her chasing it, I clicked for everything involving the cat that didn't involve chasing. Make sure that your treats are more rewarding than the cat. Bits of hotdog, cheese, or dehydrated meats work very well for this. Then, when she was consistently well with this, I introduced a default behavior for when she sees the cat. I had her lie down every time the cat walked by. The relationship between Jayne and my cat has improved immensely because of this.
 

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Also, if you decide to try clicker training buy loads of clickers. You will lose them and you will be inconsistent if you do. Put one on the kitchen counter, wherever you put your keys, in your purse (if you have one), in your jacket pocket, where you keep the treats, in the living room, in the bathroom, in the bedroom, anywhere you can think of. Box clickers only cost about a dollar a piece at PetSmart (They're cheaper than at Petco and are a better quality).
 

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Another video for the cat. Great suggestion by PR, too.

Re: the leash, start doing some counter conditioning/desensitization to it. Hold the leash so she sees it, treat, let her approach it, treat, touch her with it, treat, clip it, treat, while she has it on for a few seconds, treat the whole time, take it off and stop the rewards, repeat. Start lengthening the time she has it on and make sure you are giving treats.. Go as slow/be as repetitive as you need to be so that she is comfortable at every step before progressing.

She might also be more comfortable if you connect it to a harness rather than her collar.

Make sure you check this thread out: http://www.dogforum.com/dog-training/helpful-training-videos-articles-11426/ for a ton of helpful training videos. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks everyone! I'm slowly working my way through all the training videos-- its a lot of information to absorb all at once, so I'm kind of watching a rewatching the ones I need most right now.

But all the advice has been great! I've heard of clicker training for cats, but never heard of it for dogs before. I couldn't find a clicker at our local Wal*Mart (my car is kinda broken atm, so couldn't go as far as the nearest PetSmart) but hopefully I can get my hands on some soon!
 

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While clickers are more effective, you can also use a verbal marker like "yes." The trick is to say it as consistently as possible... it's still the mark, not the reward, so don't sometimes say "yes" and sometimes say "YES!!!"

OR, you can use a clicky pen until you find a clicker. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Oh! I'd thought about trying to get my hands on a flashlight without batteries until I could get one, since it was closest sound I could think of. A pen didn't even occur to me! Now the trick will be keeping that clicky pen out of my own mouth. AJ isn't the only one with chewing problems ;).
 

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In the meantime, use management techniques: gates, separate rooms, drag a leash (when your home) n and separate when you are not supervising/home.
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I second this. If you can't control the behavior yet, prevent it.

Have you tried removing AJ whenever he starts the behavior? Just silently remove him from the room and disallow him re-entry for a few minutes. Then let him back in, and as soon as he resumes the behavior remove him again. That way he learns that the only way he can be in the area with you and the cat is if he does not pester her.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I suppose I can try to keep her in the bedroom for a minute, since I can't remove Milo. I tried the interrupting noise from Kikopup yesterday, and AJ has responded very well to it-- now we just have the problem that Milo wants the treats too, and will walk over after AJ leaves to try and get one, even the kibble. Le sigh.
 
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