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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there, my girl is a 3.5 year old husky/lab mix & seems to be gaining a significant amount of weight. She’s not overweight by any means, but in the 3+ years I’ve had her she’s always been on the thin side, and I don’t want to see her gain even more.
Albeit it is the middle of winter, which I know is common for dogs to gain weight during this time because of the lack of exercise + consuming the same amount of calories as in the summer. The only issue I see here is she’s fed a very healthy, grain-free, dehydrated raw beef diet (Only Natural Pet brand) & is given a very minimal amount of treats (she’s had skin allergy issues in the past so I try not to interfere with that.) On the note of food; she does also always act like she is hungry, even after just being fed. Sometimes I give her a bone or a chew just so she’ll stop whining for more food.. But if she could eat all day, she would! She has a habit of trying to get into the garbage, the cat’s food & the cat’s poop every now and again, as if she’s “starving.”
I also still walk her every single day for at least 30 minutes, and I play catch/ tug of war with her indoors, as well as in our backyard almost daily. We also go on hikes every weekend that consist of 1-2+ hours of walking & running around with her doggy friend.
As a side note; she has had issues with impacted anal glands before, and I do have to internally express them every now and again. I’m not sure if her allergies / anal gland issues are relevant to the weight gain, but some insight would be awesome.
Thank you!
 

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When I hear "weight gain" I hear the same thing I hear from from facebook friends who complain about "corona kilos" .

If you say, "I have gained weight but I'm not overweight" then you are lying. By the time someone gets to the point of admitting it, they're fat. I'd put €100,- on that bet every day.

Realistically if you say that about your dog then you are not facing facts. The dog is fat.

Just like with people, losing weight means

1) restricting calories
and
2) increasing activity

It's not hard. It's an equation with two variables. You can either reduce the amount they eat, increase the amount of "outside time" or a little of both.

It's really not that hard.
 

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It is possible that it is medical though.

If it is significant, relatively sudden, not related to a change in diet or exercise, then I'd be asking the vet for blood tests.

That said, 30 minutes walking a day doesn't sound much (my 10 year old, 8 kilo dog gets at least 3 times that) and labs have a tendency to put on weight easily.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Okay I came on here hoping for better advice pointing toward something medical, considering my dog is NOT obese. She’s just filled out slightly by her hips. As a dog groomer, I 110% know how to spot an obese dog. As I stated, in 3+ years of having her I have not changed her diet or her exercise routine, yet she is suddenly gaining a BIT of weight (she’s literally only 50 pounds which is not overweight by any means for a husky/lab mix of her size.) She also has allergy issues & anal gland issues which could very well be related. Thanks for your snarky reply, but I understand all of that already. You must have missed half of what I said.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Okay I came on here hoping for better advice pointing toward something medical, considering my dog is NOT obese. She’s just filled out slightly by her hips. As a dog groomer, I 110% know how to spot an obese dog. As I stated, in 3+ years of having her I have not changed her diet or her exercise routine, yet she is suddenly gaining a BIT of weight (she’s literally only 50 pounds which is not overweight by any means for a husky/lab mix of her size.) She also has allergy issues & anal gland issues which could very well be related. Thanks for your snarky reply, but I understand all of that already. You must have missed half of what I said.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It is possible that it is medical though.

If it is significant, relatively sudden, not related to a change in diet or exercise, then I'd be asking the vet for blood tests.

That said, 30 minutes walking a day doesn't sound much (my 10 year old, 8 kilo dog gets at least 3 times that) and labs have a tendency to put on weight easily.
I just meant her walks are a minimum of 30 minutes, and that’s just when it’s late at night and I don’t feel comfortable walking her too far from my home. Otherwise she gets more than 30 minutes, and multiple times a week we do well over 2 hours of walking, as I live by a trail! I also only say “significant” because in 3 years she’s literally never gained a pound on her normal weight of roughly 47 pounds. She’s not fat by any means, I’ve just noticed a slight roundness to her hip area that hasn’t happened in any pervious winter season. But thank you! I’ll look into a blood test.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
When I hear "weight gain" I hear the same thing I hear from from facebook friends who complain about "corona kilos" .

If you say, "I have gained weight but I'm not overweight" then you are lying. By the time someone gets to the point of admitting it, they're fat. I'd put €100,- on that bet every day.

Realistically if you say that about your dog then you are not facing facts. The dog is fat.

Just like with people, losing weight means

1) restricting calories
and
2) increasing activity

It's not hard. It's an equation with two variables. You can either reduce the amount they eat, increase the amount of "outside time" or a little of both.

It's really not that hard.

Okay I came on here hoping for better advice pointing toward something medical, considering my dog is NOT obese. She’s just filled out slightly by her hips. As a dog groomer, I 110% know how to spot an obese dog. As I stated, in 3+ years of having her I have not changed her diet or her exercise routine, yet she is suddenly gaining a BIT of weight (she’s literally only 50 pounds which is not overweight by any means for a husky/lab mix of her size.) She also has allergy issues & anal gland issues which could very well be related. Thanks for your snarky reply, but I understand all of that already. You must have missed half of what I said.
 

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How much have she gained? Do you happen to have a before and after picture so we could get an idea of how much she has put on?

If you feel like nothing have changed and she’s uncontrollably gaining weight I would suggest a vet visit. However there might just be normal reasons behind why she’s gaining weight. She haven’t been fixed has she? If so, that’s a pretty clear cause for weigh gain.

However I agree with previous posts that 30 minutes of walks a day (even though you offer more at times) definitely doesn’t sound like much for a husky/lab. Before taking her to the vet I would at least increase the exercise and decrease the food. Another thing that can play a part is the fact that she is fully grown now compared to previously. Hormones and such also changes from when she was younger and could result in her more easily gaining weight.

There is a possibility that some medical issue is causing it, but in 99% of the cases (don’t quote me on that) it’s just about not enough exercise and too much food. So therefore I would start there, if that doesn’t help and she mysteriously keeps gaining weight, then a trip to the vet might be of interest.
 

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I think you are getting a bit bent out of shape because people have answered saying things you don't want to hear - but take a moment, because you said -

gaining a significant amount of weight
So when you then say -

. She’s just filled out slightly by her hips
you can't blame others for misunderstanding.

And when you say
walk her every single day for at least 30 minutes,
again it's not unreasonable to challenge that, as you probably realise because you counter with

her walks are a minimum of 30 minutes
We can only go on what you say. If you haven't given a full or accurate description, don't blame others.

Thanks for your snarky reply
Nobody gave a snarky reply.
 

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I should apologize to the OP. I was in a foul mood when I wrote my intitial reply and when I read it back just now I also thought it was unnecessarily snarky. I'm sorry about that.
 

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If a vet says your dog is to fat, than you act on it. So first visit a veterinarian.

I got rescue that is severe overweigth. In these three weeks he has lost already 0.22 lbs. We feed him on the same amount as his kilo's in weight as he came in.
Went to boiled chicken filet for training, which is low fat. We walk him four times a day. Started of slow like 10 minutes. Now its like atleast 30 min every walk.
If your dog is overweight be carefull, they may loose somuch of bodyweight per week or month.Exercise slowely build up when its a heavy weight. But a vet can tell you more about it.
Kinda of as the same as with humans.
 

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If a vet says your dog is to fat, than you act on it. So first visit a veterinarian.

I got rescue that is severe overweigth. In these three weeks he has lost already 0.22 lbs. We feed him on the same amount as his kilo's in weight as he came in.
Went to boiled chicken filet for training, which is low fat. We walk him four times a day. Started of slow like 10 minutes. Now its like atleast 30 min every walk.
If your dog is overweight be carefull, they may loose somuch of bodyweight per week or month.Exercise slowely build up when its a heavy weight. But a vet can tell you more about it.
Kinda of as the same as with humans.
To be fair you don’t need to see a vet to determine if a dog is in need of loosing or gaining weight. Of course a vets opinion on your dogs body condition is great and if your vet establishes that the dog is over or under weight, you should act accordingly. But it’s definitely not necessary to decide whether or not the dog needs to loose or gain weight. So don’t be afraid to act on it just because you lack a vets opinion.
 

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And what if the dog has underlating medical issues Sunflower? And here I go again... your dog shows vertebrae and ribs visible to the eye. Not OK! That probs why you dont go into the vet anymore, discussions.
 

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And what if the dog has underlating medical issues Sunflower? And here I go again... your dog shows vertebrae and ribs visible to the eye. Not OK! That probs why you dont go into the vet anymore, discussions.
Uuhm okay.. So I assume you’re talking about my profile picture? A bunch of assumptions and misinterpretation here, but I’m gonna try to sort it out for you 😘

So lets start with the picture, it’s taken under movement and when she is heavily breathing, which obviously contributes to the ribs getting more visible (which is normal). For the record no vertebrae is showing, but I guess that’s difficult to decide for an untrained eye. However I’ve never given an opinion on her body condition and never said that it was ideal. Even though how the picture is taken makes it look as her ribs are way more prominent than they actually are, she was a bit on the thinner side, which I was well aware of. This was nothing strange since she’d just been put on a new feed and her exercise had been increased. Therefore I increased her food, and weighed her regularly, as well as kept track of her body condition by photos. There’s also a big difference between a “slim-fit” dog and an emaciated dog. She was fit, had good muscle built, her general condition was great, her weight-loss wasn’t drastic or mysterious and she gained weight with the new feeding plan. Her body condition was never “bad” or dangerous, but she could gain a little weight.

Here’s a video of her from the same day as the profile picture, that shows her body condition in a more fair way, to I don’t know, ease your concern?

I’ll also attach a picture that shows her body condition in a more fair way.

I’m the first to bring my dog to the vet if it’s needed, but in this case it wasn’t. I don’t go running to a doctor every time I gain or lose some weight, my ribs are showing and I’m fine :) If everyone had to go to the vet every time they thought their dog could gain or lose some weight, there would be no appointments left. With that being said, it’s another thing if your dog mysteriously and drastically lose or gain weight while their general condition is affected. Or if they can’t seem to put on or lose any weight. Then you should bring the dog to the vet. I have no idea why you assume I don’t bring my dogs to the vet but go off I guess.

Also a bit comical that you in your introduction post complained about other forums and how they always turn into discussions on who’s dog is fittest. And yet here you are, bashing me and a dog for it not being in the right shape, that you literally know nothing about. Honestly I don’t mind at all, just found it funny.

Op, I’m sorry if this disrupted your thread, just felt like I had to clarify some things.
 

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That looks better Sunflower indeed.
My dog, Peanut died cause we thougth he was just getting fat and didnt go to the vet.
Since his spleen was already removed, we thougth it was his stomach pushing a bit out after dinner.
Turn out it was liver cancer, within three days it was done. We couldnt do anything about it and was horrible to withness.
So it isnt a unnecessary luxery to take your pet to a vet with sudden weigth changes 🤷‍♀️
 

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That looks better Sunflower indeed.
My dog, Peanut died cause we thougth he was just getting fat and didnt go to the vet.
Since his spleen was already removed, we thougth it was his stomach pushing a bit out after dinner.
Turn out it was liver cancer, within three days it was done. We couldnt do anything about it and was horrible to withness.
So it isnt a unnecessary luxery to take your pet to a vet with sudden weigth changes 🤷‍♀️
Yeah I know, so maybe don’t speak on things you know absolutely nothing about.

I’m sorry for your experience. However I still stand by the fact that it’s not realistic or necessary to bring every dog to the vet that slightly shifts in weight when it’s likely connected to normal causes.
 

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Yeah I know, so maybe don’t speak on things you know absolutely nothing about.

I’m sorry for your experience. However I still stand by the fact that it’s not realistic or necessary to bring every dog to the vet that slightly shifts in weight when it’s likely connected to normal causes.
Sligthy yes, but when there is sudden weight change? It is worth a vet visit, just saying. Ty for your sorry and believe me we had lots more work on health with Peanut. The one time we skipped it? It was to late do anything. If I go around the corner of my street? I spent the same amount on crap as a vet visit.
 
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