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So I am visiting my girlfriend, and I can't help but worry about my 5 year old staffy. Back at home she lived in a quiet neighborhood and didn't meet much people. But ever since we got here, too much worries me. She wanted to bum rush an exterminator visiting the apartment, but then acted like best friends when they met again outside. Went to get froyo, and she went ballistic at every other person/child. We chalked it up to being over stimulated between the heavy traffic and constant flow of people. The biggest concern is my girlfriend's roomate's girlfriend. She has been regularly suspicious of her between investigating what she is doing or staying near her food dish every time his girlfriend walks near it. Yet they (roomate and his girlfriend) were play fighting/wrestling in the kitchen and she ran in and began to jump up on them and even nipped her leg which she had NEVER done in the time I owned her. Other than that there hasn't been any noticeable aggressive body language. No growling, no teeth baring, no fear body language... Was she just trying to break up what she thought was a fight?
 

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First off, it sounds really normal that many dogs will behave aggressively at first when an "intruder" comes to their property. Dogs are territorial animals and that's normal behavior. The fact your dog was friendly after she met him was a good sign though.

In terms of barking at all sorts of people in public sounds like reactivity. It's likely fear. And if your dog has never been around a very populated area then it makes sense she would be fearful, confused, and reactive. If this continues it most definitely needs to be dealt with.

The issue with the girlfriend--that sounds like two issues. One sounds like resource/food guarding. The other sounds like protecting your roommate. You did more or less hit the nail on the head. Dogs can often misinterpret humans playing, hugging, wrestling (and not to be vulgar, but sexual intimacy) as an attack and intervene accordingly.
 

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This sounds to me like (a) anxiety resulting from exposure to/immersion in a strange (new to her) environment compounded by (b) her lack of prior socialization ("didn't meet much people"). Even well-socialized dogs get amped up when you throw them into a new environment and its associated stimuli. My suggestion is that you stay at her side to manage the situation, assuring her (with treats where appropriate) to get her to realize you're good with this situation, and that she is therefore safe too.

Often when I see my pup starting to panic or overreact, I go down on one knee (to her level, we're in this together), one hand on the collar, and the other with a stroke on her chest while I say "OK" (our keyword for "it's cool"). Sometimes I hold a treat in my hand, right up to her nose to get her mind diverted onto good/tasty things. When she lets up a bit, I give her the treat, then bring out another. It's not a panacea, but it gets your dog thinking this situation isn't as riddled with danger and threat as she thinks.
 
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