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Discussion Starter #1
I was on a long walk yesterday when it occurred to me I'm not sure how long I should be walking my dogs in such hot weather. They didn't seem too stressed, but I hadn't brought water with me so I kept taking breaks. Upon returning home, their water intake wasn't too drastic, in fact one of them even waited a bit before even drinking water.

I've been trying to lose weight and our walks have been around 1.5 hrs long. I obviously don't want to harm my pups. Any thoughts?
 

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80 is too hot. You need to take into account not only their water intake, but the heat of the cement below their feet. Cosmo has gotten blisters on his pads in 80 degree weather. I would suggest always bringing water, watching your dog for cues on whether or not he's over heating (excessive panting, tacky gums, lethargy or walking slowly) and investing in some heat protective booties for the summer.
 

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To me, 80 is not too hot. Currently temps are in the mid 90s by mid afternoon, and will be 100 before too long. When I start my walk around 8AM it is in the high 70s sometimes and is 80 before I return. Today it is hot, it is 82 now at 8:15AM and we have not started our walk. I bring water for me and the dogs and we take a break sitting in the park for 5 minutes for our water. My dogs do not have and pad damage from their walks, of course I try to walk on the grassy curb when I can.
It is not safe to walk in the dark here, and that's what I would have to do to walk them in under 80 temps. The 90/100s heat will continue until September at least.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I think a happy medium is going to be to try to walk earlier in the day. It's only 72 right now, so I think I should be good.
 

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To me, 80 is not too hot. Currently temps are in the mid 90s by mid afternoon, and will be 100 before too long. When I start my walk around 8AM it is in the high 70s sometimes and is 80 before I return. Today it is hot, it is 82 now at 8:15AM and we have not started our walk. I bring water for me and the dogs and we take a break sitting in the park for 5 minutes for our water. My dogs do not have and pad damage from their walks, of course I try to walk on the grassy curb when I can.
It is not safe to walk in the dark here, and that's what I would have to do to walk them in under 80 temps. The 90/100s heat will continue until September at least.
What kind of dogs do you have?
 

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I don't think 80 is too hot either. There are many factors to consider IMO:

1) Cement temp: in my area, there are TONS of trees. Even though the air could be 80, we're walking 90% of the time in shade so it's not so bad. If you're near any wooded trails, it's a nice alternative on a hot day.

2) Humidity: 80 degrees with 90% humidity will feel different that 80 degrees with 10% humidity.

3) Personally for an hour and a half walk in 80 degrees, I would bring a little water and offer it halfway through but I know my dog wouldn't take it.

I hike with my dog in the summer. We go on 13 hour climbs and I offer water very often. She barely drinks. She's carrying a pack and when we stop to eat and at the summit, I take her pack off to give her a break.

Every dog is different. It sounds like you're in tune with their body language so I wouldn't worry too much. :)
 

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Here is an interesting article with a reply from a vet that suggests 90 degrees at the line. Even then I agree with Aspen, it depends on the circumstances, a short walk at the beach in 90 degree weather might be fine.
For me, because I am a senior, I do not do outdoor yard work or go walking over 90, but when I was younger I could do that. So there are a number of factors to consider.
ASK THE VET: When is it too hot to walk your dog in Scottsdale?
 

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In the summer we just do a quick walk in the morning and evening, and some time out in the middle of the day in the shady back yard (while the sprinklers are turned on. Extra games of indoor tug and fetch to tire her out.

I would bring water if out in the sun with my dog for more than 45mins, also if you can hold the back of your hand on the sidewalk for 10 seconds without it hurting, it is cool enough for your dog, but remember dark colored surfaces hold heat more, so when you cross the tarmac road, it might hurt, even if the white sidewalk outside your house is fine.
 

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I think you really have to factor in a lot of the circumstances others have mentioned as well as a few more. In addition to the temperature, what's the humidity and dew point? If they're both high, eighty is going to feel a lot warmer than if both are low. Are you walking on cement that's been in the sun all day or is there a lot of shade? Are you on the grass? Is it early enough in the day that the cement hasn't had a lot of time to heat up after cooling down overnight (assuming it had time to cool down overnight)? How long are you going to walk? How fast are you going? Will you have any time along the way to let your dog get a drink, rest? Is your dog a breed that is particularly susceptible to heat stroke? How old is your dog? Is there somewhere you might exercise your dog where the temperature is not a factor (e.g. I saw dogs run agility courses last night when it was in the eighties but they were in an air-conditioned building where it was nowhere near the eighties, but I've also done therapy dog work that involved walking through air-conditioned buildings and a walk, indoors or out, is still a walk)?

I don't think it's as simple as just what the temperature is.
 

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Within reason, it depends on the dog. Some dogs tolerate heat much better than others. Ours, for instance, even at 70 degrees, if the sun is beating on her, she does not do well, and will quickly overheat. We walk early in the day, and do longer walks when its overcast and cool.
 

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I also don't think 80 is too hot. If it was, my guys would never get out, actually @jclark343 probably wouldn't get out either. :p

It routinely is around 75-80 before noon here. Both of my dogs are double coated, and poor Heidi is black, so we walk in grassy areas, with lots of shade, and if the walk is going to be an hour or more, I take some water with me.

Both of my dogs have never shown any sign of distress, even when temperatures climb into the high 80's or 90's.
 
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Discussion Starter #13
I think perhaps I was worrying for nothing. I do tend to walk in the sun though, with brief stops in the shade. The times I have remembered to bring them water, they usually don't drink much of it so it ends up being extra weight on me. My cattle dog mix is very fit and mostly white. My beagle has a tiny bit of extra weight on him but not overtly, I think he and I both fare well with the exercise!

It's no matter today, unfortunately it's storming pretty good.
 

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80+ around here is certainly too hot for Cosmo on his pads, that's for certain. They will blister and burn.
 

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God if 80's are too hot I'd never leave my house. 80's is a great night here.

I don't see a problem with walking an hour and a half in 80's. I would be aware of what surface you are walking on, and also (a weird one) what color your dog it. I know Roxie is black and attracts more sun so she is going to get hot faster then Forbes may. I try to always bring water with me because, well, I live in Florida and I need a drink as well. I will also get them wet (usually in the areas where they have exposed skin to cool them down faster) if they are looking a little hot, but I've not seen that in an hour and a half walk.

If you're really concerned about the heat you could always look into a cooling vest. I know @Boxerluv has a few of the ruffwear swamp coolers and she likes them. They are not only white to attract less heat, but I believe they cool them by pulling the heat from their body. I haven't bought one yet as anytime I am spending a large amount of time outside my dogs are usually splitting their time between being out and being in crates with fans.

Surface is your biggest issue. Try to avoid walking on pavement or cement. Try to walk in the grass. Remember that many dogs will not show pain during the walk, it will hit them when they get home and their adrenaline has stopped pumping.

For perspective the weather today at 7:45 am was 84 degrees. It's a high of 90 today (feels like much hotter) with humidity at 69%. With an 80% chance of rain. Yea, summer is here.
@cos, what surface were you walking him on? Does he typically have softer pads? I'm sorry to hear his pads burned.
 

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Think it depends where you're going for a walk. Walking on hot pavement in the middle of the day is going to be painful for their feet. Walking in shaded woods on soil or next to some body of water is probably fine. However I would take water with you if you're out for that long in that heat. You may not feel like you need water but I'm sure your dogs would appreciate it. Just be aware of any changes in their behaviour. Ultimately you're the one that knows your dogs the best. Be careful and any signs of stress, turn back and reevaluate at what time of the day you take them out.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The pavement thing is a concern since like I said I do walk in the sun. I live in a large neighborhood so we are on sidewalks a lot of the time, and the road. I have never seen blisters on their pads thank goodness
 

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i dont remember where i read the phrase "if its too hot for your feet its too hot for theirs", i think it was on this forum, but anyways.

i follow that quote by the word, however 80 degrees is not hot at all, that's actually quite common around here even in winter, anything above 88 is starting to reach hot-hot threshold and we'll stay at home and do something else.
 

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80 is absolutely perfect weather for us lol. We see highs of 110 during summer.

Anyway, don't overthink it. Just use common sense. Take water with you or stay in parks where water is available. Different dogs have different tolerances for heat on their paws. 80 might cause some to burn their pads on asphalt or concrete. For others it's not that bad at all. So know your dog. You can always walk in grass at parks, or hiking trails that are mostly shaded. You can get the dog a cooling coat. You can walk after sundown or before dawn. Heat is no reason to stay cooped up until you live where I do and it's 90 degrees at 8am.
 

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My kelpie had heat stroke walking on leash in 80 degrees. I suggest just carry water and pour it on their backs if they look hot and also to drink. Supposedly kelpies can go for miles in Australian heat. Not mine. He only went a few blocks too. Dousing him with water every few blocks is all it takes and he's fine. Definitely have water just in case.
 
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