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Discussion Starter #1
This otherwise problem-free Yorkie+Jack terrier is a seven year old neutered dog at about 25 pounds. He's active, a successful hunter, highly protective, and a superb companion. Overall an excellent pooch.

His diet is consistent: Purina One with no human food, treats, or supplements. He's not a glutton; his food is always available, so there's little chance of hunger (empty stomach) vomiting.

HOWEVER, he has recently exhibited episodes of lethargy with bilious (greenish yellow) vomiting. The vet is unable to explain the problem, but administered a compazine injection that "worked". Famotidine did not seem to help.

In the past month, the dog has exhibited two of these episodes, each lasting about 24 hours. Recovery seems total.

Obviously, we're a bit concerned - mostly because the vet is unable to account for the problem.

??
Thanks for your insight...
 

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Did your vet do blood panels or run other diagnostic tests? Did your dog have a fever?

My puppy had something similar this summer. She?d vomit 1-2 times a day - but she had a fever. She really didn?t act lethargic tho but she?s a 2 year old lab puppy so there are few things that keep them down.

She had blood panels, pancreatic panels, urinalysis, and an ultrasound - nothing was conclusive so the vet said she likely had a virus. If your vet isn?t searching for answers then find another one.
 

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We just went through a similar episode with Samantha. She start vomiting, maybe once a day, sometmes twice, then seemed to recover for a week or so. Then she suddenly started the vomiting again, but it was also accompanied with some strange behavior, such as hiding under chairs, avoiding being touched, which is not her. So to the Vet we went, he found nothing unusual during the physical exam, but was suspicious of liver function, and possible pancreatitis, lots of blood was taken and some urine. He called later that day, results were, good liver function, good kidney function, no pancreatitis, Heartworm test negative, heart, lungs good, and by now Samantha was acting pretty normal again. She has been fine for a week and a half, good appetite, energy levels have returned, she is all into cuddling again. With no recurrence, we can really only speculate she must have had a virus and just felt lousy. $$'s spent for tests was IMO well spent, we know for sure her organs are all performing well. Had my wife and me really on edge for awhile.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It could just be Gastrointestinal Reflux Disease (GERD).

Try giving him 10 mg of Pepcid about 20 minutes before feeding him and see if that helps.
Thanks.
We thought of reflux and as mentioned we tried Pepcid (famotidine) - no help. Yellow (bilious) vomit indicates bile, right? That's suggestive of an empty stomach, but he always has access to food and is at his optimal weight.

ALSO
Vet did not do labs, explaining that at this stage she does not know what to look for.

==============
Coincidentally, at this moment our dog is in the middle of one of these described acute situations, with general malaise, lethargy, and vomiting. He rejects food and drink, and is unwilling to walk.
 

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Vet did not do labs, explaining that at this stage she does not know what to look for.
As someone who works in the vet medical field, that is a very scary statement. Based on your description bloodwork and xrays would have been the first diagnostics that we would have recommended. And with the repeat of symptoms bloodwork would have been pushed even harder the second time around.

Regardless of your vets diagnostic abilities, if you don't look for the problem then you will never find it until its screaming in your face and often too late to do anything about it. 98% of the time our doctors are running the testing to confirm their diagnosis and make sure their aren't any secondary issues that have gone unnoticed. With he other 2% they are still able to make a diagnosis after testing and often find out after the fact that the symptoms were present, but for whatever reason the owner didn't want to admit that they were happening or assumed those symptoms were just normal dog things. Very rarely do they need to do further work up, like ultrasound or specialty lab tests, to determine a diagnosis. Personally, I would look into finding a new vet for a second opinion if you're able.
 

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Sorry, you did mention that you had tried famotidine. My mistake.

The only other thing that comes to mind is pancreatitis. I would suggest changing from Purina One to a dry food with a lower fat content. I would also find a vet who would do a fecal exam, bloodwork and x-rays on a dog with unexplained vomiting.
 

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I?m not normally an alarmist but your vet not doing blood work is concerning. Of course he doesn?t know why the dog is vomiting - vomiting is a very general symptom that can be caused by a laundry list of things. But that?s why you look for reasons why. Personally I would find a vet that was more proactive.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
After an uncomfortable night, I'm happy to report that the dog is definitely on the mend. This morning he brought in the paper and made coffee, as usual.

This newby is grateful for the help here, and will talk to the vet again today.
 

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Watch your dog closely for any sign of abnormal behavior. In my post above, even though Samantha is fine, its comforting to have the results of the full blood & urine panel (all within normal ranges) our Vet ran when she had similar symptoms. Looking at your Vets reaction, I can only compare to our Vets response, which was without hesitation to take blood and urine, to know what we may or may not be up against. Knowing our Vet, had there been anything questionable, I know there would have been follow up Xrays, ultra sounds, if indicated, and if nothing definitive at that point a referral to a specialist.
 
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