Dog Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So I adopted a dog this past weekend (have had him 5 days now), and he is the most adorable and loving guy. I am attempting to implement the two week shut down. He is just over 1, and he has never been consistently disciplined. I read that during these two weeks you are not supposed to train them. However, he has a nipping problem. I know this is not unusual behavior but I am having a hard time stopping it and yelping and ignoring him isn't working. He is 50lbs, so he is not small and he is strong. When I take him outside on the 6ft leash he is usually ok, but on the long lead (when I am not directly controlling him) he will sometimes come charging at me to play but he starts nipping me and it hurts and is very difficult to get him to stop. He occasionally does this in the home as well even on the leash, but it is less likely. In the spirit of not heavily training him during these two weeks and just letting him adapt and bond with me, how do I handle this? In the case of the lead, would just walking out of the range he can reach send the wrong signal to him? In the house I do not want to crate him when he does this, because his crate is his sanctuary but I feel like it's too soon to put him on time out and redirection does not always work (I am still trying to find a toy he will latch on to almost every time). Any advice is much appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
254 Posts
I think a two week shut down is a great idea. You don't want to be liable for a 50lb dog that bite/nips. I think there's a difference between crating as a punishment and using a crate as a sanctuary, and you don't want to confuse the two.

I would do umbilical training. The dog is on a 4foot lead with you at all times. if he nips while training then stop what you are doing find a spot that is a "time out" spot. Make him lie down until he's completely relaxed. This can take a minute or 10. Once you see him relax then get him up again and keep working with him. This gives the reinforcement that biting is not ok and will ruin his fun, and that being calm gets rewarded. It may take more than 2 weeks, but 2 weeks is a great start.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
When he starts nipping and biting the only way to get him calm is to forcefully hold him down or away from me (which is doable - he does submit to me eventually when he realizes we are no longer playing). Is it bad to to do this though? I know positive reinforcement with dogs is known to be the best method so I do not want him to become afraid of me (not that he seems to be). I plan on beginning to clicker train after the two weeks to use positive reinforcement, and I pray he eventually stops the biting because it doesn't get him anything he wants. However, for now, if it is ok to forcefully calm him your advice sounds like it could definitely work for us.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
10,820 Posts
You can start training now. You do not have to wait any length of time to start. If he was a very timid dog that was wary of you I'd say it would be a good idea, but your guy sounds like the exact opposite and will really benefit from being made to use his brain.

Set him up for success, whatever you do not want him to do, like counter surfing, getting in the garbage, eating the mail, make it as difficult as possible for him to do it, or not necessary in the case of the counter. Keep the trash where he cannot get it, pick up the mail and put it where he cannot reach it, keep the counters clear of all food.

For the nipping give him a toy he can have and play with him with it every time he nips you. If he drops the toy to nip again then give him back the toy, if he again drops the toy to go for you then get out of his reach, preferably out of site if you are inside. To do that you can leave the room (if it has a door), put him in his crate with a nice chew or stuffed kong so that the crate does not become a place of punishment, or if outside tie him to something and get out of reach. Stay out of reach for a couple of minutes at most then go back and try again. You are not punishing him by doing that, just teaching him that if he wants you to stay with him and play he cannot nip, and that nipping gets you to leave. It's his choice on what he wants to do.

Keep training fun, but do start it. It will help to exercise his mind which will help wear him out. It is also a great for strengthening the bond between dog and owner. My boy LOVES training, and we've been training since I got him when he was just over a year old, for him it's a great deal, he gets to learn something, he gets yummy treats, he gets attention from me.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top