Dog Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi all.

We have a 5 yr old Jack Russell cross which we rescued 2 yrs ago (we are her 4th owner) and after two years of extensive training her, she has turned into a much calmer, lovely dog.

We are considering getting another dog for company for her and we have found a lovely male, 22-24 mth old jack russell/ staffie cross at the RSPCA......however, I read this morning that you shouldn't leave two Jack Russells together as they could fight - and cause bad injuries if they are left on their own?

I will be here with them most the time in the day, but I do go out sometimes for shopping etc....so is this a good idea for me to adopt this dog?

Does anyone on here have two Jack Russells?

Thank you for any replies
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
502 Posts
Any two dogs could possibly fight-and any two dogs could also get along just fine. If you think it could work, give it a try!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Any two dogs could possibly fight-and any two dogs could also get along just fine. If you think it could work, give it a try!!
I was thinking that too but wasn't sure.

I have just taken my husband to meet the dog at the RSPCA and the woman was horrible that brought the dog out to us.....she told me and my husband off for absolutely everything - from the way we held the lead to praising the dog with his name when he walked nicely ...she insisted on walking round with us all the time (even though I had walked round with the dog on my own yesterday for an hour)....she was enough to put anyone off owning a rescue dog!

Honestly she made us feel that we just werent good enough to own a dog (even though we had other dog from there two years ago)! ....so I really don't know what to think now.....I wonder if anyone else has experienced this from the RSPCA?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
500 Posts
I know JRTs who died when one accidentally got into the space where other(s) were kept. The person who owns those dogs does not let them live together as a pack but the dogs live in pairs, I think they have usually male and female together unless one is on heat. Non-breeding dogs are also neutered (no heats/less testosterone, makes life easier). I make the situation sound mopre horrible than it really is. Also, the pack will reduce when the older dogs pass away.

I have dogsitted some of them at my place (one at the time) and they get well along with my dog but it is probably because Alva is bigger and so starting a fight with her has more risks. Alva is also less likely to be provoked into something ugly.

So I'd say the JRT is not the securest breed to have in a pack but a pair might work if the personalities match.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
669 Posts
Jack Russels tend to be a pretty tenacious breed, and dog reactivity/aggression is pretty common among them. I have yet to meet a Jack Russel that I would consider 100% trustworthy with other dogs in all situations, though that isn't to say they don't exist. A lot of them tend to be have a "control the world" type of attitude, and are one of the few breeds that I would say is as often reactive/aggressive from a place of wanting to control other dogs and resources as from fear and/or anxiety, if not more often from the former than the latter, at least from my experience with them, and they do tend to be quicker to bite/fight than a lot other breeds.

Not all are snippy, and some get along great with the dogs they live with, but that is more a testament to the individual dog than the breed. As a breed, I would say they tend to be iffy with other dogs. You're not looking at the breed, though, you're talking about two individual members of it (and it sounds like both are mixes, so they might not be very true to the breed standard in temperament anyways and may take after the other breeds in their mix completely).

When adding a new dog to your house- ANY new dog- it is definitely important to err on the side of caution and not leave the dogs unattended together until you are sure of the relationship between them, and even then to do so with caution. There are cases where owners have left 2 dogs loose together that were great with each other and have come back to injured or dead dogs, that's just part of leaving dogs loose together. You may not ever be able to trust both dogs loose alone if one or both have resource guarding tendencies- which are also not uncommon in Jack Russels- and that isn't the end of the world.

The best thing you can do before committing to a dog is have a meet-and-greet with your own, first on neutral territory and then in your home. I'd advise against doing it at the shelter only because shelters are stressful environments and it's very likely that the dogs won't interact normally there because they are under stress.

Also have a realistic expectation of your dog based on his past behavior with other dogs- if he tends to be iffy with other dogs, he's more likely to be a challenge when adding a second dog. If he's always been perfect, he'll likely be OK but you may still run into issues- living with another dog is different than spending a few hours around others. If he loves other dogs, he'll probably do fine. If he has always seemed to only tolerate other dogs, he may be a bit of challenge. Do some research into multi-dog households, don't leave toys and treats laying around where the dogs can fight over them and give treats when dogs can easily take them to separate areas, supervise them when they're together, and have a fallback plan to be able to keep them separate some of the time if you need to. A baby gate and/or playpen is probably a good bet for separation. Having the name of a good trainer on stand-by isn't a bad idea, either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
669 Posts
In terms of the rescue volunteer being intense- some people that work or volunteer in shelters and rescues can be a little much. There are a lot of people in that world that think they are doing everything right and everyone who doesn't do it exactly like them is doing it wrong. Not everyone is great with shades of grey. Try not to let it get to you too much! At the end of the day, once you have the dog, it's your dog and you can do things how you want (unless its one of these rescues where they don't transfer ownership to the adopters for a set amount of time, which personally I'm not a fan of).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I just wanted to say a big thank you for your replies, it has really been food for thought.

I am really not sure what to do now
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,034 Posts
I was thinking that too but wasn't sure.

I have just taken my husband to meet the dog at the RSPCA and the woman was horrible that brought the dog out to us.....she told me and my husband off for absolutely everything - from the way we held the lead to praising the dog with his name when he walked nicely ...she insisted on walking round with us all the time (even though I had walked round with the dog on my own yesterday for an hour)....she was enough to put anyone off owning a rescue dog!

Honestly she made us feel that we just werent good enough to own a dog (even though we had other dog from there two years ago)! ....so I really don't know what to think now.....I wonder if anyone else has experienced this from the RSPCA?
I've certainly experienced that with some people (not in the dog world, but they are everywhere), and bravo to you for realizing that it is not you, but her personality.
I am really not sure what to do now
Try for the dog and just play the game with this impossible person.
If for some reason you don't get to adopt there, look at other places.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top