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Well I've been looking for a dog to add to my family. I want an older large breed puppy actually.
The trouble is, I've been searching for a dog on Craigslist because I find it's an easier way to find older puppies, and at the local Humane Society. The Humane Society seems to be filled with Cattle Dogs and Border Collies (two breeds my landlord doesn't allow) and the people on Craigslist seem to be far too concerned with first come/first serve instead of the quality of the home. That and too many ads are flagged. :/
I live in a rural area so it always takes me a little while to find a good time to come up, and people are always impatient so they rehome their dog to a closer home instead.

See, I can't afford to get a dog that's more than $400 because I can't put down more than that amount at one time, so a high-ranking breeder is out of the question. I mean, I also have to pay for food, shots, a vet check up, and whatever else she will need.
You see I am 16 and my parents finally decided I had shown enough responsibility and was educated and experianced enough on dogs and dog care that I could handle having my own dog. I have to pay for her and her vet care and food and everything. So it will be my responsibility.
Does anyone have any advice for me on different dog-searching techniques or advice for a new dog owner?
 

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Have you tried looking at the local rescues in your area? There always seem to be rescues in a lot of larger cities!

It is weird that your landlord won't allow Collies or Cattle dog... any specific reason?
 

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Check out petfinder.com

If you are looking at CL for puppies, then you need to do a little more research on responsible dog breeding practices. If you asked me, I'd say not enough ads were flagged on CL in some locations- those "breeders" are the BYBers, and if they didn't have a place to pawn off their pups or a market that will buy them, then they'd be out of business. That fact that you realize that they are interested in the first cash deal, should show you that they're not all that interested in the well being of the dog or their breed. Odds are, they will not have done all they could to ensure you'd be getting the healthiest pup possible, either.

If you're limited to $400, you might still be able to buy a pet quality pup from a good breeder- often they'll be offered for a discounted price with limited registration or a Spay/Neuter Contract.

OR, again, try petfinder, your local breed rescues, shelters from neighboring towns, etc. You could adopt a puppy for less than $200 and then save the rest of your money in a "vet expenses" savings. If you add to that savings occasionally, you'll no doubt be prepared if/when you have a vet emergency with your new dog. :)
 

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Are your parents going to help you out at all financially and with the daily care that a puppy will need? Even routine care (food, toys, routine medical care, etc.) quickly adds up, not to mention the cost of an emergency! Also, at 16, I was far too busy with school and hanging out with friends. I would never have had the time to exercise, train, and socialize a puppy. I'm really not trying to hurt your feelings or discourage you. I just think you should seriously consider these things before getting a dog!;)
Assuming your parents are going to help you, then I would go to your local shelter and see who is a good fit. I would also suggest that you consider an adult dog (will give you a better idea of energy level) that is already house trained. And one more thing, you will very likely need your parents to go to the shelter with you and they will most likely have to be the ones to officially adopt.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I may be 16, but I am far more responsible than my 20 year old sister. xD
Yes, my parents will be helping out with daily care until I leave the house.
I will have the time for a dog because I go to school only 4 days a week and I have no after school activities, and as pathetic as it may sound I have no friends. So my schedule is open. xD

See, the reason I am looking for an older puppy or an adult dog is to avoid the whole backyard breeder thing. I understand the problem with people randomly and irresponsibly breeding dogs, and people buying from them are only promoting the problem and the issue of overcrowded shelters.
I can understand those puppy ads being flagged, but I've seen a lot of ads for people REHOMING their adult dogs getting flagged for no reason at all! That's what gets me!

The thing about getting a dog at a shelter is that we have a bunch of guidelines that our dog has to fit. She has to get along with dogs, cats, kids, AND livestock. She has to be used to living rural so that she doesn't dart when given the chance, and she has to be housebroken.
 

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I hate to say this but most people who rehome dogs on CL are liars. They will tell you that the dog is housebroken, good with kids, good with cats and so on and maybe half of those things are true and most likely the housebroken one isn't. Not saying there aren't some good people who have very unfortunate circumstances who would try to rehome their family pet on there but I'm sure they are few and far between. I say Petfinder and a local shelter are going to be your best bets. Also I hope you find your perfect pooch soon. :)
 

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Yep, Petfinder and local shelters/rescues are the way to go. There really aren't a whole lot of other options that aren't full of people that will be eager to take advantage of what they see as a "naive kid" (not saying that's how you are, just what they'll assume from your age). Don't expect to find your perfect match quickly, it will often take a while of checking to find the right dog. If you can tell us your general area and any particular breeds you prefer then we can try to find some breed rescues that operate near you. They usually will be more willing to work with you to match you to the right dog that fits your situation.
 

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The housetraining and not darting and all that could be tought to the dog if they don't know it. If you want the perfect dog you're looking for, i agree with what others said. Petfinder or a local rescue will be your best bet. Many of the rescues have volunteers who foster dogs and usually helps in training and socializing them. For a house trained dog a rescue is your best bet if you want a dog that is already 'trained' to some degree.
 

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Hi, I agree with a majority of the posters, petfinder.com really is a great place. There are PLENTY of dogs out there who need homes, even those who are purebred but were given up for reasons like divorce, new baby, ect. Also, for a particular breed of dog, try searching in google: (your breed of choice) rescue in (where you live) Whatever dog you decide to get, I strongly suggest adopting. Why buy a dog when you can save a life by adopting? Hope this helped!
 

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Welcome to the forum and it is wonderful you are trying to find a dog!

You might also save up some additional money for vet bills. Often a new dog you get that is being rehomed, needs a lot of vet care initially. I hope your parents are willing to help with the expense. We've had some wonderful young folks on the forum this last year who's parents were not willing to help with unexpected vet bills and it sure created a tough situation.

On a more positive note, my niece is similar to you in getting a dog as good company as she does not have a lot of friends near her. It has worked out really well and the dog has been a great joy in her life and given her great confidence in herself too.

Hope you find your dog, and also hope you hang out here at dogforum. There is so much to learn. I am still learning from the "old timers" here, even though I am 48 years old myself!
 

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Most shelters these days are much more interested in making good placements than simply pushing out animals that are likely to "bounce back" if put into a poorly fitting home. A good shelter staff will have evaluated the animals as best as they can to determine what sort of home is a good match - including interaction with other animals, existing training, known concerns/issues, etc. The issues you are voicing concern about are also fairly easily addressed if they do surface after selecting a dog. Also, remember that a dog who is said to be great in all the areas you are concerned about may very well come into your home and reveal a completely different dog than they showed in the previous home. A dog who is completely housebroken, for example, will often have a regression period in response to a change of homes - requiring a complete re-training by the new owner. Rescues, specifically, tend to be highly selective in the placements of their dogs -- meaning they are going to take what you are looking for and match it with the dog they feel best meets all you are looking for and YOU match all that the dog needs in a home/owner.
I would encourage you to keep a more open mind about rescue groups/shelters. Also, because you are interested in an older puppy or adult dog, try contacting breeders within your area for breeds you are interested in. You may find a terrific "deal" on a dog that was kept either for breeding or showing that has not panned out as expected -- the dog may be a great fit for a home, just not what the breeder expected them to mature into for the original purpose. Also, responsible breeders often include a "right of first refusal" in their contracts with buyers -- meaning if a buyer is unable to keep the dog for any reason they would be returned to the breeder and the breeder then has an older pup or adult dog that they need to find a new situation for.
I know the search can be frustrating, just keep at it and the dog that you are meant to find will come along.
 
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