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Discussion Starter #1
Hi again, I'm new and I feel like I've already asked so many questions! (thank you for all your help, this community feels really welcoming :) )

But I've been doing a lot of research lately (this actually all stemmed from me finding out about the Blue Buffalo controversy and exploded from there) and I don't feel comfortable feeding Bandit (2 y/o rescued mix) or Molly (my parents 9 y/o pug) commercial dog food anymore.

I'm planning on starting the transition to homemade food as soon as possible and I've done a ton of research on recipes and whatnot, but I'm seeing a lot of conflicting advice on specific strategies including; raw vs. cooked, puree veggies or just chop, organ meat everyday vs. organ meat once monthly, portion sizes seem to vary ridiculously (Bandit is 25 lbs and depending on the recipe, all of which I want to tweak a bit, it varies from 1/2 a cup twice a day to 1.5 cups twice a day). Does anyone have any tips on the transition? and I'd appreciate any links to specific studies because my dad is hard to convince.

I'm not really looking for specific recipes, I have a couple base recipes that make sense to me that I'll vary from time to time. But I'd feel more comfortable with it if there was some guidelines to portion control or specific supplements I may need. I understand I could go to a nutritionist (and I will eventually I promise :) ), but honestly I don't have the money right now and every time I feed him commercial food knowing whats in it I feel awful and like a bad pet parent so I don't want to wait.

Molly has a history of kidney stones (only when she was very young) and my parents have had her on Hill's prescription dry dog food ever since. When I looked it up the food wasn't very good for her. But my dad is scared to switch because he can't really afford if she got another kidney stone. I've talked to her vet and it looks like there may be some preventative supplements she could take instead of the food. But I'm having a hard time finding any information online about kidney stone preventatives. Would I be doing a disservice to her switching her away from the prescription food?

Thank you for reading this super long post and I just wanted to say I appreciate how helpful and nice everyone is on here. I've never joined a forum before (heard scary things lol) but I'm really impressed with the community here! thanks guys :D
 

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@naturalfeddogs is usually my go to resource for all questions pertaining to Raw food, but there is also this website which is very useful for raw feeding information
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you! I read on that website that there shouldn't be a transition, just go "cold turkey". will that upset their digestive systems? Bandit I'm less worried about because he seems to have an iron stomach from living outside on his own for however long before I found him, but Molly has always been more sensitive.
 

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Yes, just switching cold turkey is best when it comes to raw, and I don't do home cooked but considering it is cooked like kibble is, you probably could with it as well.

I don't like home cooked because of being cooked, nutrients are cooked out and have to be artificially added back, and trying to get all the lost nutrients supplemented in balance is difficult. With raw, when fed in variety of meat/bones/organs everything needed is supplied.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Okay. I have heard of keeping vegetables raw and pureeing them for easy digestion, and lightly cooking meat to lower human risk of disease. Does that sound like a feasible option? Also is goat or lamb good options for meats? I ask because my mother has a close acquaintance that raises goats and is willing to sell us some at a really good price. I've also heard not to grind any meat, is that true?
 

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Okay. I have heard of keeping vegetables raw and pureeing them for easy digestion, and lightly cooking meat to lower human risk of disease. Does that sound like a feasible option? Also is goat or lamb good options for meats? I ask because my mother has a close acquaintance that raises goats and is willing to sell us some at a really good price. I've also heard not to grind any meat, is that true?
Vegetables aren't needed. The only way to get what little is in them out, is to puree, and there is nothing in them that isn't already in raw meat/bones/organs, all of which is also so much easier to digest too.

There is no more human risk in feeding a dog raw than handling raw meat to prepare to cook for yourself. Just use the same precautions you would otherwise. In ten years of raw feeding, all I do is wash my hands in plain hot water, and just wipe down counters with a wet rag after.

Goat and lamb are both great to feed! I wish I had a way of getting those more often.

Grinding meat does increase the bacteria level, but for a healthy dog that isn't a problem. Grinding also loses the benefits of mental stimulation that comes from ripping and tearing whole chunks of meat. You also lose the benefit of teeth cleaning from bone. Which in turn also can cause loose poops as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you!! I really appreciate all of your help... one last question, is there any specific portion sizes for different weights or breeds?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
thank you so much for your help!
 
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I actually heard about it form my co-worker. Here's a link to one of the articles I read. Blue Buffalo advertising draws long history of complaints - VIN

Basically Blue Buffalo has lied in many of their advertisements saying they are by-product free. and Purina did some tests and proved that not only did by-product make up "a significant portion" of a lot of their foods. But there was also grain remnants in their "grain-free" food. They eventually settled with Purina, but only after admitting in court that it was true, but saying they didn't have to put it on the label because it was their ingredient manufacturers that put that in and not them. (a legal loophole many dog food company's have used recently)
 
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