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In anticipation of a new puppy in the next several months, I would like to buy a couple of training books and start treading up. I am totally overwhelmed. I was recommended Cesar Milan by a few people, but now am reading on here to stay away from his ideas. Same with the Monks of New Skete. What are their ideas and why are they wrong? Who are the recommended trainers out there, or the recommended training philosophies?
 

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Yay! I love dog owners who prepare in advance!!

One really straightforward, practical book is Dr. Sophia Yin's How to Behave So Your Dog Behaves. She explains the science of how dogs learn, but also has a lot of really good training advice to help handle behavior issues and teaching basic manners. Dr. Patricia McConnell's The Other End of the Leash is really great for understanding dog behavior in more depth, as well as helping understanding some of the behaviors of dog owners! There's a sticky in the training & behavior section of the forum with lots of good book ideas, but I think those two are a great place to start.

Cesar Milan is a television entertainer. His ideas about dog behavior & training are laughably out of date, except it's hard to laugh at methods that cause dogs so much stress (or are so eagerly copied by so many people). The Monks of New Skete are also fairly old-fashioned, and used to advise a lot of physical force (not necessary when training dogs, also not advisable). There are much kinder, better, more scientific, and more fun ways to train and have a relationship with your dog. I'm so glad you're seeking them out!
 

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The problem with Cesar Milan and those other trainers is that the are advocates of the dominance theory. The results of the dominance theory are fearful dogs, aggressive dogs, and not having a good relationship with your dog.

The training theory that is encouraged here is positive reinforcement, which uses very little negative reinforcement and lots of good reinforcement (praise, treats, play) when a dog preforms a desired behavior. This theory is based on science while the dominance theory is based on wolves. But dogs are no longer wolves, and have been genetically altered by humans for a long time, making them much different from wolves.

It is great that you are doing your research. I can't recommend a lot of books but I have heard a lot about "Don't Shoot the Dog". (I am planning to buy this book myself) This book goes into detail about explaining canine behavior so that we can better understand our dogs.

A few good trainers are: Kikopup, and Zak George. I am sure there are many more out there but those two are the ones I an familiar with.

Good Luck getting your puppy. :) Hope this helped a bit. Anyone is welcome to critique what I have stated here because I am a learner as well.
 

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I have found that I resonate with the work of Kevin Behan, his techniques have worked were +R and operant conditioning hasn't. I also highly recommend reading his book, Your Dog is Your Mirror, to understand his philosophy.

Natural Dog Training
 

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In anticipation of a new puppy in the next several months, I would like to buy a couple of training books and start treading up. I am totally overwhelmed. I was recommended Cesar Milan by a few people, but now am reading on here to stay away from his ideas. Same with the Monks of New Skete. What are their ideas and why are they wrong? Who are the recommended trainers out there, or the recommended training philosophies?
Don't shoot the dog by Karen Pryor.
 

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Also, I just want to make the point that Don't Shoot the Dog, How to Behave So Your Dog Behaves, The Culture Clash, The Other End of the Leash, and many other good books all share a basic philosophy. All are scientifically-based. All believe that relationships between dogs and people are healthiest with less coercion, force, threat, intimidation, or confrontation. Lots of emphasis on setting a dog up to succeed, versus trying to "correct" a dog after she has made a mistake. Lots of emphasis on learning to read dog body language and understand basic dog behavior. So even though there are lots of different recommendations flying your way, a large majority are in the same philosophical and practical school of thought!
 

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If you only read one book about dogs and dog training, read Culture Clash by Jean Donaldson. You'll understand why the Millan and Monks of New Skete methods are terrible choices.

You've only got one chance to get your puppy off to a good start. Going down the road of dominance and punishment is a mistake.

Please stay away from the Behan recommendation. +R used to train behaviors (operant conditioning) is based on science. It works if you understand how to train. Trainers who tout some sort of "new" method are usually those who have no strong education in animal behavior. As someone said about Behan , he's a legend in his own mind.
 

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Please stay away from the Behan recommendation. +R used to train behaviors (operant conditioning) is based on science. It works if you understand how to train. Trainers who tout some sort of "new" method are usually those who have no strong education in animal behavior. As someone said about Behan , he's a legend in his own mind.

I disagree, Behan is a veteran trainer he is not touting new methods, he has been working with dogs since he was 10 years old. His father was the first celebrity dog trainer in the US. Kevin broke away from his father (who used the dominance method) in the 1970s because he didn't agree with his father's ways. The problem with those who diss Kevin is they are so caught up in their own dogma that they can't see where their methods are based on old and faulty "science".

Kevin Behan has never had to rehome a dog because he wasn't able to train her, unlike another famous trainer that is often recommended here.
 

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I disagree, Behan is a veteran trainer he is not touting new methods, he has been working with dogs since he was 10 years old. His father was the first celebrity dog trainer in the US. Kevin broke away from his father (who used the dominance method) in the 1970s because he didn't agree with his father's ways. The problem with those who diss Kevin is they are so caught up in their own dogma that they can't see where their methods are based on old and faulty "science".

Kevin Behan has never had to rehome a dog because he wasn't able to train her, unlike another famous trainer that is often recommended here.
Behan frankly is controversial...

As for that last little snark... all trainers at somepoint are going to have a failure of somesort be it with clients/client dogs or their own dogs. Trainers are after all only human. We make mistakes just like anyone else. Hopefully far fewer in regards to dogs than the average person but it happens. Even to Behan.
 

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Kevin Behan has never had to rehome a dog because he wasn't able to train her, unlike another famous trainer that is often recommended here.
I think it shows a great strength of character to rehome a dog you know you cannot help, and potentially has a better chance with someone else. Especially when you are being held to a higher standard because you're a trainer, and thus magically supposed to be able to fix any dog. I think any trainer who can't admit defeat/failure is one I wouldn't want to learn from.
 

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Ah I understand how you feel, I think most of us felt like that at some point. There were so many things I believed to be true about dogs but when I did my research I realized many of the things I assumed about dogs were inaccurate or just plain wrong.
Keep reading and learning don't give up :)
I would definitely recommend reading the books recommend in this thread.
Culture Clash is one of my favorites.
I would also recommend checking out the stickies here Training and Behavior Stickies they have a ton of info

Here are a few to start you off
http://www.dogforum.com/training-behavior-stickies/dominance-dogs-4076/
http://www.dogforum.com/training-behavior-stickies/suppression-modification-shutdown-fallout-4776/
http://www.dogforum.com/training-behavior-stickies/thoughts-training-food-1219/


This website has a ton of articles you may find interesting Dog Training and Behavior Advice and Information
Edit: Specifically about the Dog Whisperer http://4pawsu.com/dogpsychology.htm http://4pawsu.com/cesarfans.htm
 

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I would second (or third or fourth) Don't Shoot the Dog by Karen Pryor. It will always be a relevant and accurate book. R+ training (positive reinforcement) is going to be the easiest, most effective, and widely supported method for training your puppy!

Speaking as a student pursuing an Ethology degree, I can give you my view on the science of this debate. I would stay away from anything that remotely mention "alpha dog". This is all a fallacy based on out dated, debunked research on captive wolves in the 1920s. It has absolutely no basis in science and I cannot stress that enough. Be wary as well of advice given in the context of "dominance". Social animals live in a constant state of compromise, deferring to one another in matters such as; who gets the best sleeping location, who gets the best piece of meat, who gets to chew on that stick. A "submissive" animal is the one who takes the lesser part of the deal more often, while a "dominant" individual gets the better bargain on average. It really has nothing to do with hierarchy or force, at least in the societies of most social predators. Therefore, a trainer who promotes themselves as using methods which are "positive reinforcement" is going to be your best bet. They are likely some one who understands a decent amount of the studied facts behind their philosophy. Positive reinforcement is a basic element of operant conditioning; the principle by which all behavior is learned. If you use R+ reactions in conjunction with correct timing and repetition, you can strongly increase the likely of your dog acting the way you want them to.

If you want to learn more about the science behind your dog's behavior, read The Genius of Dogs. The book was written by the students of the Duke Canine Cognition Center, where they are making cutting edge discoveries about what our furry friends aremthinking, and why they think that way.
 

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I think it shows a great strength of character to rehome a dog you know you cannot help, and potentially has a better chance with someone else. Especially when you are being held to a higher standard because you're a trainer, and thus magically supposed to be able to fix any dog. I think any trainer who can't admit defeat/failure is one I wouldn't want to learn from.
Especially when you selected the breeder and raised the puppy according to your methods, methods you are charging others a lot of money to learn.
 

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The Dog Whisperer by PAUL OWENS, not Cesar Milan, has been the best and most natural fit for me and my training style.

I had also bought Good Owners, Great Dogs - a little old fashioned, but still had helpful bits that didn't border on that whole dominance pack theory bull

The Puppy Primer - it is what it is - just a brand new reference to get started. You'll get through it as soon as you buy it and can start right away doing the exercises with your puppy as soon as you bring her/him home. Very short and very basic, but helpful if you feel overwhelmed and don't know where to start.

In addition to these, one of the more helpful things for me has been a book on horsetraining - Zen and Horseback Riding. It's all about leading your horse with your breath and your energy, and I credit it for helping me teach loose leash walking to my puppy as well as being a better rider.
 

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I would also suggest "Control Unleashed - Puppy Edition" by Leslie McDevitt. It is a great book that teaches games and behaviors to prevent reactivity in dogs. Highly recommend.
 
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I use positive training with my own dog and my guinea pigs. I got my rescue in August and she's already shaping up to be a very amazing dog.

My favorite book is Control Unleashed: Puppy Program by Leslie McDevitt.

I am a dog trainer and people come in saying that they use Cesar's methods because their dog (a puppy about 10 weeks old) is very, very dominant. The puppy is a baby! There is no dominance going on at all! Most dominance behaviors are just untrained dog behaviors that you can work on very quickly with positive methods. I found that any dominance based methods, by design, put you in an adversarial relationship with your dog instead of a cooperative one.

I've seen a video where Cesar was trying to teach his dog (which he had as a puppy) to lay on a mat. Junior is confused, unsure, and afraid to try the mat behavior due to using too much force. https://www.cesarsway.com/dog-behavior/anxiety/cesar-on-separation-anxiety

Compare to how quickly this puppy learns it. https://youtu.be/1Tf-K-LvsiY
This puppy readily goes to the new object and gets a lot of praise and so understands the behavior within minutes.
 
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