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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an American bully that is is a little more than 3 months old. We are struggling with him because he was in a big playpen area at first but started tearing up the peepee pads and water bowl and anything he can get a hold of. I know that’s not good for him so we put him in a crate. He doesnt care about sleeping in his pee so he pees in his crate all the time. (Even pees on his bed when he’s out free and sleeps on the bed). But I know that can’t be good for his skin/fur and needing to be bathed daily. Any advice??
 

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I have an American bully that is is a little more than 3 months old. We are struggling with him because he was in a big playpen area at first but started tearing up the peepee pads and water bowl and anything he can get a hold of. I know that’s not good for him so we put him in a crate. He doesnt care about sleeping in his pee so he pees in his crate all the time. (Even pees on his bed when he’s out free and sleeps on the bed). But I know that can’t be good for his skin/fur and needing to be bathed daily. Any advice??
How long are you leaving him in the pen/crate?

You need to take him outside to pee. Leaving him in his crate to pee in there and then sit on it is not a good thing at all to do to a puppy. It is up to you to take him outside so that he learns how to go where he is supposed to. If he is peeing in his crate it means he was not taken outside when he needed to pee and that is your job.

If he is tearing things up that means he is probably not getting enough exercise or stimulation. He needs walks, training periods, play time and attention every single day.

Get rid of the pee pads and start taking him outside every half hour. EVERY half hour. If he pees or poops, praise him like crazy and give him treats. When he is inside, don't let him out of your sight, and when you see signs that he may be ready to pee, take him out and praise him for going outside. don't ever punish him or scold or even make any disapproving noise to him if he does pee in the house.

He is not old enough to hold his pee for hours, and he also has not been taught that indoors is not where to do it. You can change this but you need to start now.
 

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At three months old, he will have almost no control over his toileting. I'm not keen on pads as they give mixed messages to puppies about whether indoor toileting is allowed or not.

Toilet training happens when two things come together - the ABILITY to hold the toilet, along with the DESIRE to hold it in order to earn the reward for doing so.

Ideally you want him to not be in a position where he needs to toilet before you have him outdoors, so that every toilet is outside - as far as possible, there will be accidents! So set him up to succeed by taking him out even more than he needs; for example every 45 minutes to an hour and always after sleeping, eating, playing. The time between a puppy realising they need to toilet, and being unable to hold that toilet, is zero. So your aim is to have him outside before he can't help himself. When he toilets outdoors make a huge fuss (never mind the neighbours, act like outdoor toileting is the best thing you have ever seen) and reward him with a high value treat. Do that immediately, don't make him come to you for the treat so he is clear that it's for toileting and not for coming to you. The idea is that he eventually wants to earn the treat enough to hold the toilet until he is outside - once he is physically able to control his toileting obviously. As he is actually performing the toilet you can introduce words he can associate with it (like 'do weewee' and 'busy busy') that later when he is reliably trained you can use these to tell him when you want him to toilet.

If you take him out and he doesn't toilet after five minutes, bring him in but don't take your eyes off him. Any hint of a toilet inside, scoop him up and get him out fast. If he doesn't try to toilet indoors (great!) take him out a second time and repeat until you do get outside toilets. You need the outside toilet to happen SO that you can reward SO that he learns.

If he has an accident inside don't react at all. If you get annoyed he may learn to fear your reaction and avoid you if he needs to toilet (by going off and toileting out of sight) - the opposite of what you want. Dogs cant make the distinction between you being annoyed at him TOILETING, as opposed to toileting INDOORS. Take a rolled up newspaper and hit yourself over the head for not having taken him outside in time. Not when he is there though in case you scare him. Then clean the area with an enzymatic cleaner to remove any trace of smell that might attract him back to the spot.

Indoors if you see him circling or scratching the floor, that can sometimes precede toileting so get him out fast.

Overnight he is unlikely to be able to control his toilet as his little bladder and bowel are underdeveloped and not strong enough to hold all night, so set your alarm to take him out at least once if not twice during the night.


Edited - cross posted with Madra
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
At three months old, he will have almost no control over his toileting. I'm not keen on pads as they give mixed messages to puppies about whether indoor toileting is allowed or not.

Toilet training happens when two things come together - the ABILITY to hold the toilet, along with the DESIRE to hold it in order to earn the reward for doing so.

Ideally you want him to not be in a position where he needs to toilet before you have him outdoors, so that every toilet is outside - as far as possible, there will be accidents! So set him up to succeed by taking him out even more than he needs; for example every 45 minutes to an hour and always after sleeping, eating, playing. The time between a puppy realising they need to toilet, and being unable to hold that toilet, is zero. So your aim is to have him outside before he can't help himself. When he toilets outdoors make a huge fuss (never mind the neighbours, act like outdoor toileting is the best thing you have ever seen) and reward him with a high value treat. Do that immediately, don't make him come to you for the treat so he is clear that it's for toileting and not for coming to you. The idea is that he eventually wants to earn the treat enough to hold the toilet until he is outside - once he is physically able to control his toileting obviously. As he is actually performing the toilet you can introduce words he can associate with it (like 'do weewee' and 'busy busy') that later when he is reliably trained you can use these to tell him when you want him to toilet.

If you take him out and he doesn't toilet after five minutes, bring him in but don't take your eyes off him. Any hint of a toilet inside, scoop him up and get him out fast. If he doesn't try to toilet indoors (great!) take him out a second time and repeat until you do get outside toilets. You need the outside toilet to happen SO that you can reward SO that he learns.

If he has an accident inside don't react at all. If you get annoyed he may learn to fear your reaction and avoid you if he needs to toilet (by going off and toileting out of sight) - the opposite of what you want. Dogs cant make the distinction between you being annoyed at him TOILETING, as opposed to toileting INDOORS. Take a rolled up newspaper and hit yourself over the head for not having taken him outside in time. Not when he is there though in case you scare him. Then clean the area with an enzymatic cleaner to remove any trace of smell that might attract him back to the spot.

Indoors if you see him circling or scratching the floor, that can sometimes precede toileting so get him out fast.

Overnight he is unlikely to be able to control his toilet as his little bladder and bowel are underdeveloped and not strong enough to hold all night, so set your alarm to take him out at least once if not twice during the night.


Edited - cross posted with Madra
The thing with him is that he knows where he is suppose to go and where he isn’t. Unfortunately, I nor my spouse have a work schedule where we can take him out hourly. It’s every few hours but he had a whole area to pee before. We actually put down turf like it’s a big area where he can play throughout the day and pee if needed etc. He designated an area to pee but only goes when he feels like it. If not, he will pee on his bed instead of walking 2 steps to his spot. There are specific turf areas where he can go but he doesn’t just cause. He goes poop in the correct spots but not pee half the times.
It’s moreso the fact that he doesn’t care about laying in a dirty area and I’m not sure how to teach him to not pee on his bed.
 

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The thing with him is that he knows where he is suppose to go and where he isn’t.
Honestly, he doesn't. It's like expecting a year-old baby to know how to use a toilet and not daipers.

And the fact he is still soiling his bed confirms that.

I'm sorry if this sounds hard and I know it isn't what you want to hear but -
I’m not sure how to teach him to not pee on his bed.
the way to do that is really just to put in the time as described above.
 

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The thing with him is that he knows where he is suppose to go and where he isn’t.
Any dog that truly understands what to do and has been fully trained for it will do it. This is something that we humans often struggle to understand, or at least forget. So while it may seem that he gets it, it only seems like it.
He needs to have even more consistent praise for doing what's right, he needs to be taken out more, and he needs to be shown a lot of patience. This is a SUPER strange concept to dogs, this whole "don't pee anywhere inside" thing. It's an extremely hard thing for a dog to learn. And since dogs don't generalize well, it will take him even longer to understand what's proper toileting behavior than you might expect.

If you truly cannot take him outside as often as was recommended by the other posts, you will need to find a solution. For instance, can a friend, family member, hired dog walker/sitter/etc., or neighbor take him out? If not, then fake grass potty spots or puppy pads will likely be necessary. As the other posts said, these are not ideal, as they do send mixed messages, but it's better than having him sit in his own pee all the time- for reasons of hygiene and health as well as training. You could leave him in his crate or, if you have one, exercise pen, (if you don't have one, and it's feasible to get one, I'd recommend you do. They're a great thing to have for a puppy) with your potty material of choice covering either part or all of the ground- part, if you know he will choose to go on them, but all, if you think he might not.
 
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The thing with him is that he knows where he is suppose to go and where he isn’t. Unfortunately, I nor my spouse have a work schedule where we can take him out hourly. It’s every few hours but he had a whole area to pee before. We actually put down turf like it’s a big area where he can play throughout the day and pee if needed etc. He designated an area to pee but only goes when he feels like it. If not, he will pee on his bed instead of walking 2 steps to his spot. There are specific turf areas where he can go but he doesn’t just cause. He goes poop in the correct spots but not pee half the times.
It’s moreso the fact that he doesn’t care about laying in a dirty area and I’m not sure how to teach him to not pee on his bed.
You are mistakenly assuming that he knows something that:
1) he is too young to have fully grasped
2) he has received mixed messages about because you used pee pads in the house
He is not deciding to do something you don't want him to do because he feels like it, he doesn't know yet. As said above, you are expecting a baby to know something they can't know yet. Would you be upset at an 18 month old child who didn't know how to use the bathroom yet, and would you say "he knows better but won't do it unless he feels like it"? This is what you are doing with your dog.

Also, don't assume he doesn't care about lying in his own pee. He does. But you have created a situation in which he has learned that this is normal and so he tolerates it. This is not healthy for the dog at all.

There is no alternative when you have a human baby than to change diapers. You have to do it.
There is no alternative when you have a baby dog than to put in the time and effort to properly train the baby to use the outside to potty.
You cannot expect a baby human being to hold their pee so you can change the diaper on your schedule.
You cannot expect a baby dog to hold their pee any more than a baby human. They don't have the capacity for it, even if they are able to grasp the outdoor potty concept, and at 3 months a dog is too young to be able even to grasp that.

This is something you are going to have to manage in a way that will teach the dog and be good for him. whatever it takes, this is what you need to do.
 
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