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I so don't want to get too involved in this discussion but do keep in mind that most people here are using "punishment" = stimuli that decreases the frequency of a behavior. It is the scientific definition used by ethologists, animal behaviorists, trainers, etc.

I understand that you do not see a verbal "No" as "punishment". BUT if a "No" stops a behavior it is by definition punishment. Sorry but it is.

If you haven't already looked over the Operant Conditioning thread that the others have linked you to, you may want to if nothing else than to get a better handle on terms/definitions. :)
 

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It seems like you think that treat training is the "cure all" magic training trick. Do you think that there are dogs who are too dangerous and too much of a liability to be rehabbed? I'm just asking this question out of curiosity.
No one is saying that "treat training" is a magic cure all...

Pretty much ditto TB.+R based methods (and like the others I do not limit myself to food rewards though I do use them frequently as food is a primary reinforcer AND food rewards allow for many quick repetitions) require time, consistency, and work. Hardly a magic fix. :)

I have yet to work with a dog who did not respond well to +R based methods (after all the laws of learning are universal! Breed and even species doesn't matter! If a dog has a functioning brain with the ability to learn learning theory applies) That would include my own dogs past (pug and boxer/mastiff type mix) and present (doberman, min pin, 2 pekingese, terrier/poodle type mix), clients (pretty wide variety of dogs including some "tough" breeds like dogos, gsd's, a mal, etc.), and dogs at the shelter (again a wide variety of breeds and mixes). If I take a step back to assess when I do have difficulty, the problem is typically a handler/training error on my part. ;)

All of that said, sure there are dogs out there who are too dangerous or too much of a liability to be rehabbed. Personally I think most dogs can be helped but not all should or can be regardless of the method used...
Are you familiar with Ian Dunbar's bite scale?
https://www.apdt.com/veterinary/assets/pdf/Ian%20Dunbar%20Dog%20Bite%20Scale.pdf
I tend to agree with it.

And last but not least, just some food for thought on the use of aversive methods for aggression cases. :)
Nicole Wilde's take (she is a certified pet dog trainer and certified behavior consultant. She has a lot of experience with wolves/wolf dogs and shelter dogs)
Do Some Dogs Need a Heavier Hand? | Wilde About Dogs
And a survey/study with stats basically showing that aversive training methods carry a higher risk for an aggressive response from a dog than positive reinforcement based methods.
https://vet.osu.edu/assets/pdf/hospital/behavior/trainingArticle.pdf
 
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