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Hi. I have a 5 year old border collie cross. My family and I suspect he has a bit of whippet in him. I got him from the humane soiety when he was 3. I am doing obediance but I cannot keep his attention very well. I tried using trearts but when he is focusing on somthing else he does not focus on me. He ignores me.Can you please help me with finding ways to get his attention and keeping it when i work with him.
 

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Hi. I have a 5 year old border collie cross. My family and I suspect he has a bit of whippet in him. I got him from the humane soiety when he was 3. I am doing obediance but I cannot keep his attention very well. I tried using trearts but when he is focusing on somthing else he does not focus on me. He ignores me.Can you please help me with finding ways to get his attention and keeping it when i work with him.
I just recently adopted a 5 year old sheltie. My fiance and I have been working with her very slowly, over a matter of a 3 days (not 3 in a row) and she now knows how to sit and lay down. It just takes a lot of persistence and a lot of practice. To help get his attention, you will want to find a treat that he really likes so he will want to work hard to get the treat from you.

All I can recommend is just stay patient and continue to practice with him and he will get it eventually.
 

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attention

I think you need to keep rewarding him with treats. Just keep trying his focus and work with him everyday. Ask your instructor for help if it is needed. Good Luck
 

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My trainer always starts with exercises to get the dog to pay attention to the owner. It is the key to learning everything else. You start by saying the pet's name and when the dog looks at you say "yes!" and then praise the dog, give treats (if you can find one that works) or give him a favorite toy.
 

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I agree, this might work. You may also try to exercise on some other place where he will not be disturbed.

My trainer always starts with exercises to get the dog to pay attention to the owner. It is the key to learning everything else. You start by saying the pet's name and when the dog looks at you say "yes!" and then praise the dog, give treats (if you can find one that works) or give him a favorite toy.
 

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My dog pays attention when I have string cheese. I do dog 4h and thats one thing that she really pays attention to. Just a suggestion
Some dogs prefer to listen better with a favorite toy
 

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Put making eye contact on cue (I use "watch me", but you can pick anything). When he looks in your eyes say your cue and give him the treat. He will learn by association. Slowly build requiring that he look longer and longer before he gets the reward and then to not getting a treat every time (praise is good).

He may be showing his border collie heritage -- they like to 'give eye' to other animals. They focus intently, may lower head and really stare. It is useful for them to intimidate sheep they are bred to herd, but other dogs don't take kindly to it. It's a good thing for you to get control over. Sometimes just moving quickly (e.g. heeling off in another direction) is enough to get them refocused on you. It makes you and the training more exciting.
 

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The best way to work on getting his attention is the clicker training way in my opinion. If you have a clicker it will be best and you can research on the internet how it's done properly. Have a look at Karen Pryor Clickertraining| dog training and cat training info, books, videos, events

What you do is hold the treat out in your one hand, your dog will naturally look at the treat. Then call your dog. If your dog just so much as moves his head/eyes away from the treat then click if you have a clicker or say good girl and treat. Then slowly start working his head to turn all the way to you and then slowly increase the time.

You can find a lot of information about clicker training on the internet if you google it. They will be able to explain it a lot better because it's actually quite in depth and too much to write here in one post, but very very easy and you will see results within the first lesson or two.

I also have a border collie x and she is such a wonderful dog, I just love her to bits!
 

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I am also a fan of clicker training and if you decide to go that route you can accomplish a lot with free shaping. Once your dog understands that the click means "that behavior will be reinforced", you gain a tremendous conduit of communication. To free shape you can just wait for eye contact at any time, then click and treat it. With some dogs you may only get a split second, but that's the beauty of clicker training (you do need good timing). After some repetitions you associate the cue and you have a powerful connection to build on. I have used clicker training to teach eye contact to all of my fosters and rescues as well as my own dogs.
 

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Welcome to the world of 5 year olds, lol. I just recently adopted Chloe, my 4.5yo Sheltie. Even though she's new to me, she's got pretty good focus. The gal that doesn't have as much focus is my Nell, she's a 20 month old BC. What I've been doing with her is doing what they call Flat Work in Agility. It's where you have your dog on leash, and be really excited, running one way, then reversing direction and get your dogs attention on you. Keep doing it til the dog is right with you. Also, if you hold training sessions that are too long, the dogs will eventually burn out, unless he's one like my Betty that just goes, goes, goes, lol. For lack of attention, keep training sessions very short, as in 1-3 minutes each, but several times a day. Don't force the dog to do anything. Also, you want really good reinforcers. I like using hot dogs, my 3 girls love them. You can even change up the reinforcers as well, like hot dogs one day, cheese another, peanut butter another, a toy another, etc, etc.

Other things you can try, if you've done some clicker work, is targeting and eye contact. Take the treat and place in your hand with fist closed. The dog will try to get the treat. The instant the dog stops and looks at you in the eyes, click and give the treat. It won't take long and the dog will look at you instead of going to the hand and sniffing, trying to get the treat. Once this is accomplished, then do it while standing, then while walking.
 
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