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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There are some plush toys I would love to get but I sometimes worry if they can present choking hazards. I'll be getting a German Sheperd puppy and I'm slightly worried if my dog may chew open the plush and try to eat the sqeaker?

Specifically something like this:ToyShoppe&#0174 Squeaker Mat Long Body Dragon Dog Toy - Toys - Dog - PetSmart

The sqeakers seem very tiny and easily swallowable.

I've been noticing there that plastic-water bottle are starting to be popular plush fillers. Seems large enough to not worry about swallowing. My only concerned is that, it may get chewed up enough where the plastic may break/splinter and have sharp points stick out? Mind you, if I notice or feel a toy is no longer safe, I will dispose of it. I suppose I could always open up the plush and remove the water bottle afterwards.

I'm just curious on everyone's opinion so I know what to keep in mind by the time I have to shop for my puppy.
 

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My dog isn't a destructive chewer, but I always watch her with her toys, and only leave her alone with toys that aren't choking hazards. I actually have a toy just like the one you linked to, but she doesn't play with it much. If you're getting a puppy, you'll learn what kinds of toys he likes, how destructive he is, and what types of toys you know he will chew through quickly (and probably stop buying them since it would be expensive). :) Just monitor him closely (which you'll be doing for potty training anyway), and give him a good variety to start with.
 

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My dogs are queen of the "squeaker - ectomy" but they never eat the squeaker. Keep a close eye on your pup when playing with destructible toys. I actually worry about them eating the stuffing - it can cause blockage.

As with anything puppy - just keep your eyes on the pup.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah if anything I'd want to avoid plush toys with actual stuffing inside. It'll either be just squeaker/ water bottle or empty. I'll be sure to monitor pup if I feel concerned about any toys :)
 

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Amazon.com: skineez dog toy

Holly loves these... and she destroys toys quickly. No stuffing to worry about and she enjoys carrying them on walks. Some people get freaked out because if she's got the gray ones, they think she's carrying a real squirrel... (come on people, really?? lol).

I remove the squeakers once she makes a hole in them... or sew them up quickly.

She also just got a water bottle toy for Christmas and she can't get enough of it... I, on the other hand, have had enough haha.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Aha yeah I've seen those! I think my breeder gives one to each of her clients for the puppies. Either way I think I'm definitely going for the water bottle stuff too :p

However, something one of my family members said did make me wonder; She cautioned me about getting any plush toys that resemble an animal pelt because that would resemble an actual animal and encourage their prey drive. Since I told her I plan to get cat at some point, she said it would be a bad idea to let my puppy play with a furry toy.

Would you agree or disagree with what she said?
 

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I think it's an interesting thought but I've never had a problem-- and between me and my parents, there are 5 cats and two dogs, one being a terrier who was a stray and one being a golden retriever.

Holly also never takes anything to destroy that isn't her toy... so maybe I'm lucky but I know lots of people with cats and dogs with plush toys and I've never heard of a problem. I am also of the mindset, unlike most people on here, that "prey drive" can at least somewhat be trained out of the dog. **shrug** FWIW.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Actually I agree with you! I'm pretty sure at the very least a prey drive can be trained to be redirected.

I understand a register prey drive should be taken into consideration, but I'm fairly confident with the proper and consistent training, it won't be as much of a problem. I'm aiming to have puppy socialize with cats early on so I'd imagine that should help. Ideally, I know getting a cat before puppy arrives is the best scenario but unfortunately that's not a possible option for me in my current situation. However, I do know there has been plenty of success stories of people getting a cat after their dog and seem to be best friends. So I know it's possible :)
 

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Two of our cats are good friends with Holly-- one plays with her and one acts like her mother by grooming her (and that cat was a feral adult when we brought her in... an exception, but still noteworthy). The other three peacefully co-exist. My two were gotten after Holly and don't pay her much mind (and Holly is very pushy lol) and my mom's three were around before her. My two only see her during visits home so they're not around a dog 24/7 and still adjusted quickly.
 

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I've been using the stuffungless stuffys with Apollo since we got him, rather than making his prey drive worse I'd say they make a handy redirect when needed.
 

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A note on that dragon you linked too, there IS likely stuffing in the head, I got a gorilla just like it and there was stuffing in the head. Not a huge deal, Apollo eventually tore it enough to let it out and I took the toy away and removed the stuffing and loose squeekers and gave it back to him no harm done, just FYI.
 
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