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Which are the top five best breeds and then the top five worst breeds for first time owners in your opinion? And why? :)

I know there is no definitive truth to this, as it all depends on the person, etc. But thought it'd be an interesting discussion!
 

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Theres no sure thing sense dogs are individuals,and breeding can make all the difference,and of course all dogs can have their difficulties sense they are living beings.
I`m going to do a top ten because I`m a rebel like that. Golden retriever,Newfoundland,Labrador,Pug,Pekinese,English bulldog,Saint Bernard,French bulldog,Basset hound and Rough Collie?

Bottom ten. Fila Brasileiro,Central Asian Shepherd,Caucasian Ovcharka,APBT,Belgian Malinois,Presa Canario,Dutch Shepherd,Bully Kutta,Jagd Terrier and Border collie.
 

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The usual "all dogs are individuals, all people want different things, the match is what matters" prefaces apply. But if you asked me, this would be my list. I'm excluding rare breeds since realistically first time dog owners generally end up with more common breeds (or mixes).

Best:
1. Greyhound
2. Rough collie
3. Sheltie (look at my self-restraint! I moved them all the way down to third!)
4. Golden retriever from less active lines
5. Havanese if they can handle the grooming; cavalier if they need something slightly lower maintenance

Worst:
1. Husky (Actually, can I make my whole top five list husky?)
2. Jack russell
3. German shepherd, especially working line or poorly bred
4. Game-bred pit
5. Malinois
 

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I guess for none rare breeds for worse.
I would list APBT,Akita,Belgian Malinois,Border collie and Chow.

Other five could be Siberian Husky,GSD,Rottweiler(although it can really depend on the breeding),jack Russel and Bull mastiffs.
 

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Forest, I agree with your first top five, except the Basset. Bassets can be stubborn, hard to train if you don't know what you're doing.
I don't really want to name breeds, more categories.
The worst thing a novice owner can get IMO:
Anything from working bred lines, be that herding, Shutzhund, game-bred, hounds and terriers. And guardian breeds; mastiffs, LGD's, etc. Those usually lead to a world of trouble.
Best: show lines; any breed, companion dogs.
Yes, dogs are individuals, I personally own a BC that's very mellow, a working bred dog who loves nothing more than to doze on my feet, his daughter on the other hand is typical working bred dog; busy! Busy! Busy! Always up to something.
 

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Best: Lab, golden retriever, beagle, chihuahua (from a good breeder), yorkie (if you'll treat it like a dog)

The above listed are (supposed to be) very human friendly, tolerant of handling and forgiving of mistakes.

Worst: Border collie, aussie, GSD, rhodesian ridgeback, cattle dogs

The above are intelligent, high energy and have instincts you really have to be careful with.
 

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I would recommend:
1. Bedlington Terrier. Believe it or not, I am not even being biased, since I have one. They are mostly intelligent, and don't shed much. They are great for allergy sufferers and are loving and caring, for the most part. They are easily trainable, yet sometimes stubborn in getting into the crate.
Cons of a Bedlington: Expensive to buy, and have health problems such as Copper Toxicosis (hereditary) eye problems, etc.
2. Golden Retrievers
3. Labs
4. Greyhound
5. Whippet



















































































'
 
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Imma switch it up and put my own spin.

Top 5 Uncommon but Awesome First Dogs:

1) Bernese Mountain Dog: The Golden Retriever you've never heard of. Fantastic with kids and surprisingly undemanding exercise-wise.
2) Greyhound: Low maintenance. Again, good with kids and undemanding exercise-wise.
3) Havanese: Easy keepers with a better sense of humour than a shih-tzu (i.e., great for kids). And yes, undemanding exercise-wise.
4) Icelandic Shepherd: Very sweet dogs, and a nice size: Not too big, not too small. Laid-back and sunny in personality; more biddable than most Spitz dogs.
5) Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever: Another Golden Retriever alternative.

Top 5 Common but Terrible First Dog Choices:

1) Border Collie: Bonkers and too smart for his own good.
2) Dalmatian: Bonkers.
3) Viszla: Just plain bonkers.
4) Labradoodle: (okay, not a legit breed, but wow what a handful!)
5) Husky: Headstrong and bonkers.

As you can see, I think that first-time owners really bite off more than they can chew by getting a high-energy, physically demanding dog. When you can't exercise the dog enough, everything else just falls apart at the seams and you wind up with a nutjob-dog that you have to steel yourself just to walk.
 

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Imma switch it up and put my own spin.

Top 5 Uncommon but Awesome First Dogs:

1) Bernese Mountain Dog: The Golden Retriever you've never heard of. Fantastic with kids and surprisingly undemanding exercise-wise.
2) Greyhound: Low maintenance. Again, good with kids and undemanding exercise-wise.
3) Havanese: Easy keepers with a better sense of humour than a shih-tzu (i.e., great for kids). And yes, undemanding exercise-wise.
4) Icelandic Shepherd: Very sweet dogs, and a nice size: Not too big, not too small. Laid-back and sunny in personality; more biddable than most Spitz dogs.
5) Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever: Another Golden Retriever alternative.

Top 5 Common but Terrible First Dog Choices:

1) Border Collie: Bonkers and too smart for his own good.
2) Dalmatian: Bonkers.
3) Viszla: Just plain bonkers.
4) Labradoodle: (okay, not a legit breed, but wow what a handful!)
5) Husky: Headstrong and bonkers.

As you can see, I think that first-time owners really bite off more than they can chew by getting a high-energy, physically demanding dog. When you can't exercise the dog enough, everything else just falls apart at the seams and you wind up with a nutjob-dog that you have to steel yourself just to walk.

Huh,If more of a real breed I would think about putting Labradoodles up top,most of I've where really mellow,low-medium energy,non aggressive and biddable.
 

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It's kind of hard for me to make a list, because sometimes it comes down to breeding or type more than specific breed. For example, I would steer people away from just about ANY working or sporting bred dog. This would include border collies, aussies, ACD's, any of the 3 similar shepherd breeds, pointers, vislas, weims, labs etc. Some dogs of those breeds, from different lines, might be more ok. Like a lab...BIG difference between a sport bred lab and one that's pet or show line. Aussies are another one. Sport line, they can be crazy. But I've seen a lot of companion bred aussies that are pretty easy, nice dogs.

I'd also suggest avoiding Jack Russel Terriers. Other terriers MIGHT be "ok" for a first time owner, but the jack and parsons are something else.
 

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The whole "dogs are individuals and so are owners" thing applies, but I'm going to echo TB and suggest new owners stay away from working or sport bred dogs. Doesn't always mean they have to stay away from the breed (I knew someone who had a field bred golden and a show bred golden. Night and day), but avoid working/sport.
For example, Nola is sport/working bred. Auggie is show and companion bred. Nola. Is. Insane. Always has been, always will be. She's absolutely perfect for me, but in a first time or average home? She'd be out of control. Augustine would be fine for a new/average owner. They're the same breed, but are total opposites in temper, energy and drive.


So excluding working/sport bred dogs, I'd say my top 5 worst would be:
1. Husky
2. Any LGD
3. Mal
4. Chow
5. Cane Corso and similar types
Bonus: Dal and JRT

Best:
1. Greyhound
2. Bernese Mountain Dog
3. Whippet
4. Miniature Poodle (if they can handle grooming)
5. Well bred Mastiff
 

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Huh,If more of a real breed I would think about putting Labradoodles up top,most of I've where really mellow,low-medium energy,non aggressive and biddable.
That thing (that I've seen) with labs is this: The healthy ones are a handful and a half. But they are also statistically the most obese dog in America. So while I do know a lot of under-exercised, under stimulated ones that are quite mellow, it is because they are overfed, fat and lethargic.

Not to say that they aren't great dogs but while some dogs get depressed when not exercised/stimulated enough... Labs get destructive. It's the soft mouth thing I think; they can easily entertain themselves by chewing otherwise unchewable stuff like wood and vinyl siding. And when you combine all this with a poodle, what you get is a highly intelligent, highly energetic dog. I'd love to own one from a rescue someday, but I think that wayyy too many people acquire them looking for a 'non-shedding' 'easy keeper'.
 

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Top five recommended:

1) Labs
2) Greyhounds
3) Goldens
4) Beagles
5) Collie

Top five that are often picked but shouldn't be:

1) Siberian Husky
2) Malinois
3) Australian Cattle Dog
4) Border Collie
5) Brittany
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That thing (that I've seen) with labs is this: The healthy ones are a handful and a half. But they are also statistically the most obese dog in America. So while I do know a lot of under-exercised, under stimulated ones that are quite mellow, it is because they are overfed, fat and lethargic.

Not to say that they aren't great dogs but while some dogs get depressed when not exercised/stimulated enough... Labs get destructive. It's the soft mouth thing I think; they can easily entertain themselves by chewing otherwise unchewable stuff like wood and vinyl siding. And when you combine all this with a poodle, what you get is a highly intelligent, highly energetic dog. I'd love to own one from a rescue someday, but I think that wayyy too many people acquire them looking for a 'non-shedding' 'easy keeper'.
Well even the ones I knew that weren't obese,and even in agility seemed pretty low energy. In fact I rarely see that breed obese,especially compared to other common breeds. In fact I swear I've seen more morbidly obese Elkhounds than them.

I know breeding matters.
Like most Rottweilers tend to be pretty mellow and despite some guarding instinct they are pretty easy to own,same with GSD's and Aussies,but the working or backyard bred are a whole another thing.
Perhaps I haven't yet meet a labradoodle that seemed more energetic or harder to handle than even the Newfie mix I owned so I`m biased but it does seem like in general many are pretty easy to own.
 

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Well even the ones I knew that weren't obese,and even in agility seemed pretty low energy. In fact I rarely see that breed obese,especially compared to other common breeds. In fact I swear I've seen more morbidly obese Elkhounds than them.

I know breeding matters.
Like most Rottweilers tend to be pretty mellow and despite some guarding instinct they are pretty easy to own,same with GSD's and Aussies,but the working or backyard bred are a whole another thing.
Perhaps I haven't yet meet a labradoodle that seemed more energetic or harder to handle than even the Newfie mix I owned so I`m biased but it does seem like in general many are pretty easy to own.
Oh, definitely. The labradoodles I know are not hard-headed by any means, just really, really goofy, really, really hyper and really, really low on impulse control. And for whatever reason they're monstrous in size! Very tall and leggy, like a wolfhound. So very quickly they add up to what is basically a smarter, overgrown Viszla.
 

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Generally I'd recommend people stay away from:

1. Large intense guardian breeds. These are the most dangerous types of dog imo in the wrong hands. If you know nothing about dogs and have never owned one, starting off with a fila, a Caucasian, Tibetan mastiff, boerboel, presa, etc is a bad bad bad idea. Most people do not need that caliber of dog at all and most people when they want a 'guard dog' really just want an intimidating dog that will bark and not one that will engage and go further. Major liability issues if you don't know what you're doing.

2. High caliber working type dogs. I'm not really sure how to classify this but I'm thinking of border collies I know, Belgians I know, working GSD, curs used to herd and hunt all day long, etc. Particularly the Belgians and the shepherds. I think most people who have not had a dog will severely underestimate the kind of intensity and edge these dogs can have. They are seriously impressive dogs in good hands. In bad hands you're going to have a lot of liability again or just be way over your head. BCs would actually probably be the easier of the dogs in the list because they tend to be a bit softer and not as guardy. But they're very intense dogs and very prone to obsessive compulsive behaviors. I see a lot of people jump headfirst into a breed like this to do sports or something... but there's no need to go from nothing to a Ferrari imo. Especially if you just want to dabble like most people. These dogs tend to require a dog centric lifestyle.

I mean generally speaking. There is no hard truth but I would encourage anyone who thinks they want one of the above kinds of dogs to do tons of research and meet lots of dogs and talk to lots of owners so you have an idea what to expect.
 

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I made a top six good and bad first time dogs, though of course there is no universal list and a lot depends on the amount of effort an individual puts into training and raising the dog.

I could have chosen six herders, but I chose dogs from various types (sighthound, herding type, hunting type, mountain type, small companion, spitz type) to suit many people's tastes. :p

More people mentioned greyhound and I agree, they're soft, sweet, gentle, quiet and easy going. On the contrary, the Azawakh is high strung, fierce and aloof.
The sheltie is a good first time little shepherd, biddable and focused, friendly and not too demanding, while the Malinois is a driven, serious, sharp, demanding dog.
The English cocker spaniel is a sweet, friendly, very happy dog that is eager to please. The German shorthaired pointer is also eager to please, but demanding and stubborn with a high energy level.
The saint bernard is a calm, huge, friendly dog that's laid back. The Caucasian ovcharka is also huge, but fiercely independent with aggressive tendencies.
The Yorkshire terrier is a sweet, happy, undemanding little dog, and while the chihuahua is also very little, it is often fragile and feisty, and people tend to forget to treat it like a dog.
Last but not least there is the spitzy Eurasier, bred to be a companion dog, quiet, a little aloof, but sweet and not very demanding. The Akita is an independent, aloof and stubborn dog.
 

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0_o I have never met a Saint that I would refer to as laid back and friendly. In fact, literally every single one that I have ever met has been dog aggressive.
 
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