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what breed is the dog from the picture?

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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

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Getting a dog based on its looks is a very bad idea, and often end up with the person giving the dog to a shelter. If you've never had any dogs, you should not get any dogs like that, *maybe* with the exception of St. Bernards, but some of them can be difficult too. (Not to mention Tornjaks and Pryeneen Mastiffs are super rare and extremely expensive.) Many dogs are beautiful, but that does not mean they will suit your lifestyle or ability to handle, train or live with them. That dog is definitely not a St. Bernard but I'm not positive what it is. However dogs that look like this are typically flock guardians that are not suitable for many dog owners, even with dog experience.

I think you would be much better off trying a dog that does better with first time dog owners. Rather than the look you like, what do you want to do with your new dog? What do you want his/her personality to be like? Do you want a puppy or adult? Where do you live in terms of city, country, suburb? There are a number of large dogs that would do better with a new owner. Newfoundlands are very sweet natured and a large, fluffy breed. Just tell us a bit more and we can do a better job of helping you find a friend that fits your life
 

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-Side note, St. Bernese isn't a breed, I think what you were thinking of was either a Saint Bernard or a Berneses Mountain Dog.
Bosnian Tornjaks and Pyrenean mastiffs are not really recommended as good first time dogs, especially if you very little to no dog experience. They are big powerful guardian type dogs, and aren't really for the average owner. And as far as I know Bosnian tornjaks are pretty rare (not sure were your located so they might be more common were you are) and Pyrenean mastiffs are also not to common.
As for st. Bernards and bernese mountain dogs, I think those would be much better choices for a first time dog. They are much calmer and more people friendly then the above two. Don't forget though that these are big dogs, do you have enough home space for them? Are you prepared for drool especially in the saint bernards case? Even though they are calmer large breeds, are you prepared to handle a big powerfull dog? Are you going to get a puppy, and if so are you prepared to raise a puppy? Are there any other breeds you are interested in?
The other thing I wanted to add, please don't decide you to get a breed just because you like the looks of it. If you find a breed you like, do lots of research about them to make sure they will fit in with your life style and be something you can and are willing to handle. And when you do decide on a breed make sure you go through a reputable breeder. Breeders are also a great resource for learning about a breed as they have first hand experience with the breed and as a give in should be very knowledgeable about the breed in general. They can also help you figure out if you will be the right kind of owner/house for a particular breed.
A shelter dog would also be a great first time dog if your interested in that as well.
@timber would be a great resource to talk about livestock guardian breeds and living with them, @annageckos would be a another good resource for what its like living with a giant breed.
 
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Looks like a Pyrenees mastiff to me more than a St. Bernard. No way its a bernie. They're good dogs or at least the one I know is. According to his owner they aren't fans of the heat so if you live in a place with warm summers, I would look for a different breed.

Also as a note to what Sabina said, Pyrenees drool just like St Bernards and pretty much every other mastiff and yes, don't buy a dog just because of it's looks.
 

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Not to mention Tornjaks and Pryeneen Mastiffs are super rare and extremely expensive.
That depends a lot on location. The use of "Race" as a false friend for "breed" is a dead give away that the OP is not a native english speaker. I imagine that Pyrenees mastiffs would be a bit more common in the pyrenees.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Getting a dog based on its looks is a very bad idea, and often end up with the person giving the dog to a shelter. If you've never had any dogs, you should not get any dogs like that, *maybe* with the exception of St. Bernards, but some of them can be difficult too. (Not to mention Tornjaks and Pryeneen Mastiffs are super rare and extremely expensive.) Many dogs are beautiful, but that does not mean they will suit your lifestyle or ability to handle, train or live with them. That dog is definitely not a St. Bernard but I'm not positive what it is. However dogs that look like this are typically flock guardians that are not suitable for many dog owners, even with dog experience.

I think you would be much better off trying a dog that does better with first time dog owners. Rather than the look you like, what do you want to do with your new dog? What do you want his/her personality to be like? Do you want a puppy or adult? Where do you live in terms of city, country, suburb? There are a number of large dogs that would do better with a new owner. Newfoundlands are very sweet natured and a large, fluffy breed. Just tell us a bit more and we can do a better job of helping you find a friend that fits your life
Thanks for your reply. I did some research and I'm proud to say that the Tornjak is indeed a guard dog and it is a big sized dog. Also I did research and what I found is that they are very calm , loyal and protecting dogs. Also, I'm 100 % sure that I will only get a puppy instead of getting a grown dog. This is mostly based on the fact that I want to have an early bond with my dog. The thing is, the dog on the picture Ive posted is a dog that I personally think is very big and also I think it looks good so its not that I don't know anything about the dog breed at all, its just that I'm confused what it really is. It could be a tornjak or it could be a pyrenean mastiff.

And to your question about the personality of the dog (tornjak) I quote this from a page about selected breeds:
''He has a stable temperament. He is friendly, calm, courageous, obedient, intelligent, full of dignity and self-confidence. When working he is fierce in guarding property entrusted to him, cannot be bribed and is suspicious of strangers. He will protect his owners, herd and property with his life. The Tornjak is friendly with people he knows. Devoted to his master and very composed in his presence, he is very affectionate toward people living in his immediate vicinity. Learns quickly and does not forget things easily, gladly performs tasks assigned to him. Strong and hardy, during the snowing winter nights, these dogs lie on the ground and often get covered by snow. He is easy to train. The objective in training this dog is to achieve pack leader status. It is a natural instinct for a dog to have an order in its pack. When we humans live with dogs, we become their pack. The entire pack cooperates under a single leader; lines are clearly defined. You and all other humans MUST be higher up in the order than the dog. That is the only way your relationship can be a success.''
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Looks like a Pyrenees mastiff to me more than a St. Bernard. No way its a bernie. They're good dogs or at least the one I know is. According to his owner they aren't fans of the heat so if you live in a place with warm summers, I would look for a different breed.

Also as a note to what Sabina said, Pyrenees drool just like St Bernards and pretty much every other mastiff and yes, don't buy a dog just because of it's looks.
True it looks more pyrenees than St.Bernard, however is it a tornjak or a pyrenees mastiff?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Getting a dog based on its looks is a very bad idea, and often end up with the person giving the dog to a shelter. If you've never had any dogs, you should not get any dogs like that, *maybe* with the exception of St. Bernards, but some of them can be difficult too. (Not to mention Tornjaks and Pryeneen Mastiffs are super rare and extremely expensive.) Many dogs are beautiful, but that does not mean they will suit your lifestyle or ability to handle, train or live with them. That dog is definitely not a St. Bernard but I'm not positive what it is. However dogs that look like this are typically flock guardians that are not suitable for many dog owners, even with dog experience.

I think you would be much better off trying a dog that does better with first time dog owners. Rather than the look you like, what do you want to do with your new dog? What do you want his/her personality to be like? Do you want a puppy or adult? Where do you live in terms of city, country, suburb? There are a number of large dogs that would do better with a new owner. Newfoundlands are very sweet natured and a large, fluffy breed. Just tell us a bit more and we can do a better job of helping you find a friend that fits your life
Thanks for your reply. I want a dog similar to that in the picture because I find it appealing to me. Why? Well apart from the looks itself, I like big dogs and I love dogs that are described as loyal to their master and also dogs that are calm. I've personally seen dogs that are hyperactive and not very loyal and obeying to their owner. This dog on the picture is described as very loyal and calm dog breed. Currently I'm living in a city, but at the time I have decided to buy a puppy I will most likely live outside a city, where the space for a huge dog will be appropriate.

As for the experience you mention, I completely agree that these races are much harder to handle than other smaller dogs, but if you can raise a puppy since the beginning, does it really matter? :)
 

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The other thing I wanted to add, please don't decide you to get a breed just because you like the looks of it. If you find a breed you like, do lots of research about them to make sure they will fit in with your life style and be something you can and are willing to handle.
Agree. I read tons of books, asked experienced dog owners, breeders and etc. before owning a Rottweiler (took me 3 years to be exact considering our location, financial status, time commitment..). Large dog-breeds are definitely not advisable for 1st time dog owners.

As for the experience you mention, I completely agree that these races are much harder to handle than other smaller dogs, but if you can raise a puppy since the beginning, does it really matter? :)
For me, it's not about raising them in puppy stage that will suffice you as a 1st time dog owner. I think every one can handle puppies at first but think of the long-term responsibilities in raising a large dog-breed. They require more exercise, larger food intake and so on. Dogs are life-long commitment.

Check out this article: https://notesfromadogwalker.com/2012/11/20/its-not-how-theyre-raised/

Good luck :)
 

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As for your original question, it looks most like a pyrenian shepherd.

(this might end up a little blocky but I'm not sure how to multi quote)
Any dog can be hyperactive and wont listen if they don't get enough training and exercise.

Keep in mind by the time you are ready to get a dog, and you are still living in the city (I am assuming apartment or even renting in this case), there may very well be weight restrictions and or breed restrictions.

Just because you get any dog from a puppy doesn't mean there going to be any
easier to handle. It just means that you are now responsible for socialization (which is always important but extremely so with dogs that have guarding instincts), potty training, basic training, dealing with any fear or aggression issues that pop up as they grow, dealing with potential puppy destruction, dealing with potential mouthing, ect. Puppies are a lot of work.
 

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As for the experience you mention, I completely agree that these races are much harder to handle than other smaller dogs, but if you can raise a puppy since the beginning, does it really matter? :)
Oh yes it matters, and it matters a lot. I am a dog trainer who has had dogs my entire life, and I've cared for and trained more dogs than I can count and there are STILL a number of breeds I would not want to own and who I would find difficult to handle.

Another thing is that you're quoting what I'm almost positive is dogbreedinfo.com. That site often has misinformation on it. First of all they list every breed (and loads of silly hybrids that aren't really breeds) around the world and gives people the idea that they're all equally available. Unless you live in Eastern Europe you will probably end up paying something like $5000 for a dog like that because they're just not in many other parts of the world. Along with that, that website promotes the very outdated, disproven "alpha theory" and is a big supporter of Cesar Milan--who is a hack that really just abuses dogs and doesn't properly train them. You want this breed on (and you can correct me if I'm wrong) based on one small description of it that might not even be correct. Have you ever met a Tornjak? You should always meet a breed before you get one. Not only that but the "suspicious about strangers" thing can be dangerous. Flock guardians were not bred to be pets. They're meant to be working dogs that lie out in a field all day and kill and passing wolves. That's why they're calm and protective, and why it's best only dog experienced people own them. I'll also add that this personality is not quite the same as a regular guard dog like say, a Rottweiler. Flock guardians are a unique type of dog. @timber is our resident flock guardian expert so maybe talk to her about it as well.

Also, no matter what their behavior as an adult, all puppies are bouncy and silly and nippy. Most dogs don't "settle" down until they're a year old, some until 3 years old. I'm curious about your mentioning dogs that are loyal as well. You'll be pressed to find a dog of any breed that isn't loyal to its master. Since you did mention it right along with loyalty I'm going to assume you're associating loyalty very closely with obedience. A dog being loyal to their owner has nothing to do with obedience. My dog Stella is fiercely loyal and protective of me, I'm confident she would both kill and die for me. That doesn't mean she's always obedient! And if obedience and ease of training is what you're looking for a flock guardian is not the way to go.

I suggest you do research that involves actually talking to some people who have owned breeds like this and meeting them if possible. But I will still suggest you not get a flock guardian as a first dog. Here are some alternatives that are likely the best large and fluffy breeds for new owners. A Newfoundland like I suggested earlier and a Bernese Mountain Dog like Sabina mentioned. Newfies also come in a black and white "Landseer" variety if you like that coloration better. They are also large and beautiful, but easier to handle. All dogs are loyal and these dogs are easier to train than flock guardians so would likely listen better. I also hope you're comfortable with huge amounts of hair and drool in your house if you want these dogs!
 

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(I accidentily posted before I finished)

I would highly suggest you join or read through a live stock guardian or if you can find it tornjak forums. They will let you know what its really like owning one, what kind of person is right for them, and the negatives and the positives of the breed. Also talk to reputable breeders.

Owning a live stock guarding dog especially ones who as a breed are prone to not being stranger friendly due to guarding can be a big liability if you don't take the time to train them or you don't know what your doing.

If your reading something that says "The objective in training this dog is to achieve pack leader status. It is a natural instinct for a dog to have an order in its pack. When we humans live with dogs, we become their pack. The entire pack cooperates under a single leader; lines are clearly defined. You and all other humans MUST be higher up in the order than the dog. That is the only way your relationship can be a success" I would take what they say with a grain of salt. Please don't use any adverse methods on any dog you get.

This might be good for you to read, its about a different breed then those mentioned but the breed has a similar temperament and feeling about strangers as the tornjak and other livestock guardian breeds. http://www.dogforum.com/general-dog-discussion/life-caucasian-shepherd-dogs-218802/
 

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Hello guys, I'm a 24 (soon 25) year old guy that never had any pets :/
I'm really interested in getting a ''big'' breed dog and I was looking through some and I found this one: http://www.inmedia.ba/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/16909_852888364746622_6710316149371732514_n.jpg

Now, my question is: What breed is this? I would like to get this dog and it looks majestic :)

I'm unsure if it is one of the following: Bosnian Tornjak
St.Bernese
Pyrenean mastiff

Thanks :)
I am not trying to be rude, but I see quite a few red flags.

1. you are choosing a potential dog on looks alone. Looks should be secondary to what would suit you, your lifestyle, your dedication, your needs; not just your want for a big beautiful dog.
2. you found a picture of a large LGD and saying this is the dog you want but don’t even know what it is.
3. you have very limited experience owning pets, more specifically LGD’s.
4. what are your long term career goals and lodging goals?

I do like that you’re here looking for help; I just think you may be going about it in a way that will not be any dogs or your own benefit.
Would you consider volunteering for a shelter or even better yet for a LGD rescue? I suggest you contact some reputable rescues and say you would like to volunteer at adoption/fundraising events so you can get lots of time getting to know people who have many years of experience with the types of dogs that call your attention. You can ask as many questions and they can get a feel for what would best suit you, and if a LSG would even be one of those dogs.

I’m also not on the boat that all 1st time dog owners have to get an “easy” dog like a Hound, Shih Tzu, or Lab, etc. I got an “easy” 1st timer dog when I got my 1st dog as an adult and it was one of the biggest mistakes. We did not mesh well together at all. I still loved them very much but was definitely not the right type of dog for me. But if you like Hounds and Labs, etc, then go for it 100%.

The common description of LGD’s as calm, loyal, and protective is accurate but they don’t come out of a box that way. It takes a lot of dedication, perseverance, training, and experience. They are not as forgiving in common training mishaps as a less intense breed That and they do much better if they have some sort of job. I could never in a thousand years imagine my Kuvasz living the city life. She would be miserable as would be all the neighbours.

I would be a millionaire for all the times I’ve heard of people up over their heads with LGD’s and sadly many times to the point where the dog is on a dangerous path amongst society. So many end up in shelters to be adopted out to inexperienced homes to only be brought back again due to common young LGD behaviours. If they would have gotten adopted into an experienced home, they would have known to expect it and known how to handle it appropriately. Instead the dog gets brought back to the kill shelter and then is deemed “rescue only” and there are plenty of times where rescue could not be found on time.

For the most part LGD’s do not learn quickly, not because they’re not smart, it’s because they are stubborn. They are bred to work independently and if they don’t feel what you are asking is necessary, they will blow you off. This is another reason they are described as disobedient, they just don’t care enough about sitting for you on command, etc.

Young LGD's also have quite a lot of energy as contrary to what most think. I have an Akbash/Great Pyrenees foster right now and this dog would run laps around a Lab. I also have a 4 year old Kuvasz, and she also needs to run off her energy. My Anatolian Shepherd X is better now for energy levels, but he too had a lot as a young dog but he still plays very rough with my Kuvasz. I had a Great Pyrenees/BMD X and he by far had the most energy. Most of the descriptions found online are of older more established dogs, not young boneheaded puppies and adolescents. They do calm down with age, but like I mentioned earlier, they are not always born this way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
As for your original question, it looks most like a pyrenian shepherd.

(this might end up a little blocky but I'm not sure how to multi quote)
Any dog can be hyperactive and wont listen if they don't get enough training and exercise.

Keep in mind by the time you are ready to get a dog, and you are still living in the city (I am assuming apartment or even renting in this case), there may very well be weight restrictions and or breed restrictions.

Just because you get any dog from a puppy doesn't mean there going to be any
easier to handle. It just means that you are now responsible for socialization (which is always important but extremely so with dogs that have guarding instincts), potty training, basic training, dealing with any fear or aggression issues that pop up as they grow, dealing with potential puppy destruction, dealing with potential mouthing, ect. Puppies are a lot of work.
Thanks for your reply. I didn't pick this dog only based on the looks.. I read quite alot about tornjaks and they seem appealing to me.. Another thing, I will NOT buy the dog untill I'm settled in a house that can house the big dog.. As for the breed, I asked because Im unsure what breed the dog on the picture is. Can I ask why you think its pyrenase?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I am not trying to be rude, but I see quite a few red flags.

1. you are choosing a potential dog on looks alone. Looks should be secondary to what would suit you, your lifestyle, your dedication, your needs; not just your want for a big beautiful dog.
2. you found a picture of a large LGD and saying this is the dog you want but don’t even know what it is.
3. you have very limited experience owning pets, more specifically LGD’s.
4. what are your long term career goals and lodging goals?

I do like that you’re here looking for help; I just think you may be going about it in a way that will not be any dogs or your own benefit.
Would you consider volunteering for a shelter or even better yet for a LGD rescue? I suggest you contact some reputable rescues and say you would like to volunteer at adoption/fundraising events so you can get lots of time getting to know people who have many years of experience with the types of dogs that call your attention. You can ask as many questions and they can get a feel for what would best suit you, and if a LSG would even be one of those dogs.

I’m also not on the boat that all 1st time dog owners have to get an “easy” dog like a Hound, Shih Tzu, or Lab, etc. I got an “easy” 1st timer dog when I got my 1st dog as an adult and it was one of the biggest mistakes. We did not mesh well together at all. I still loved them very much but was definitely not the right type of dog for me. But if you like Hounds and Labs, etc, then go for it 100%.

The common description of LGD’s as calm, loyal, and protective is accurate but they don’t come out of a box that way. It takes a lot of dedication, perseverance, training, and experience. They are not as forgiving in common training mishaps as a less intense breed That and they do much better if they have some sort of job. I could never in a thousand years imagine my Kuvasz living the city life. She would be miserable as would be all the neighbours.

I would be a millionaire for all the times I’ve heard of people up over their heads with LGD’s and sadly many times to the point where the dog is on a dangerous path amongst society. So many end up in shelters to be adopted out to inexperienced homes to only be brought back again due to common young LGD behaviours. If they would have gotten adopted into an experienced home, they would have known to expect it and known how to handle it appropriately. Instead the dog gets brought back to the kill shelter and then is deemed “rescue only” and there are plenty of times where rescue could not be found on time.

For the most part LGD’s do not learn quickly, not because they’re not smart, it’s because they are stubborn. They are bred to work independently and if they don’t feel what you are asking is necessary, they will blow you off. This is another reason they are described as disobedient, they just don’t care enough about sitting for you on command, etc.

Young LGD's also have quite a lot of energy as contrary to what most think. I have an Akbash/Great Pyrenees foster right now and this dog would run laps around a Lab. I also have a 4 year old Kuvasz, and she also needs to run off her energy. My Anatolian Shepherd X is better now for energy levels, but he too had a lot as a young dog but he still plays very rough with my Kuvasz. I had a Great Pyrenees/BMD X and he by far had the most energy. Most of the descriptions found online are of older more established dogs, not young boneheaded puppies and adolescents. They do calm down with age, but like I mentioned earlier, they are not always born this way.
All the things Ive read about tornjaks are a lie? :/
 

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All the things Ive read about tornjaks are a lie? :/
I don't think everything is a lie, I think most descriptions are missing a lot of very valuable and important information and are grossly misleading. If you are set on getting a LGD with zero experience with them or any dog for that matter, you may find yourself in a tough situation once the dog matures into what they are bred to be like. So many people are in over their heads with a dog behaving very territorial and/or wary and say there is something wrong with the dog; when in essence they are behaving as they were bred to be with little to no proper guidance and positive imprinting as a puppy.

Another point is, that if a breeder were to sell you one of their pups, they are not a reputable breeder by a long shot.

Like I said, I like that you're here asking questions, just seems like the questions you are asking should be things you already know before making the decision on wanting that specific dog.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I don't think everything is a lie, I think most descriptions are missing a lot of very valuable and important information and are grossly misleading. If you are set on getting a LGD with zero experience with them or any dog for that matter, you may find yourself in a tough situation once the dog matures into what they are bred to be like. So many people are in over their heads with a dog behaving very territorial and/or wary and say there is something wrong with the dog; when in essence they are behaving as they were bred to be with little to no proper guidance and positive imprinting as a puppy.

Another point is, that if a breeder were to sell you one of their pups, they are not a reputable breeder by a long shot.

Like I said, I like that you're here asking questions, just seems like the questions you are asking should be things you already know before making the decision on wanting that specific dog.
What would your cons be of getting the dog from the picture I posted? Also, I would like to know what breed the dog from the picture is :)
Thanks in advance.
 

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I would be a millionaire for all the times I’ve heard of people up over their heads with LGD’s and sadly many times to the point where the dog is on a dangerous path amongst society. So many end up in shelters to be adopted out to inexperienced homes to only be brought back again due to common young LGD behaviours. If they would have gotten adopted into an experienced home, they would have known to expect it and known how to handle it appropriately.....

For the most part LGD’s do not learn quickly, not because they’re not smart, it’s because they are stubborn. They are bred to work independently and if they don’t feel what you are asking is necessary, they will blow you off...

Young LGD's also have quite a lot of energy as contrary to what most think...
Timber, when I read your post, I had flashbacks to my own failed adoption of a young, Great Pyrenees mix, as a first-time dog owner. My story can be found by clicking on my username and then "statistics." I had the best of intentions when I adopted Maru. However, after two months of spending five hours a day attempting to provide him with the training and exercise he needed, I had to conclude that he was not the right dog for me, and I was certainly not the right owner for him. Luckily, I was able to place him in a no-kill shelter and he was quickly adopted by a more suitable couple.

Brian, I commend you for doing research and asking questions before you bring home a puppy. A few thoughts:

a) I hope that you can meet and talk with the owners of LGDs in your community. Go out and try to meet some of these dogs and their owners to see what it's really like to raise one. It's easy to convince yourself that this is the breed for you when doing on-line research. You need to gain more real-world exposure in order to make an informed decision.

2) One lesson I learned with my Great Pyrenees mix is to consider the purpose for which a dog has been bred and then consider whether your own lifestyle sufficiently matches the physical and mental needs of the dog. Owning a big property is not enough. What kind of lifestyle do you lead? How much time and attention can you give your dog on a daily basis? With my Great Pyrenees mix, it became very clear that he needed a job to do all the time, and it wore me out.

3) I know that you are looking for a very "loyal" dog. It's possible to develop close bonds with dogs of all breeds, but the LGD has, as Timber has mentioned above, been bred to be work "independently." My Great Pyrenees mix and I never developed a close bond. Maybe he lacked some formative experiences as a puppy, but maybe his breed led him to be more aloof. I don't know, and Timber could probably shed some light on whether a LGD is what you're looking for.

I hope that you continue to be opinion to the range of opinions that you're receiving here. At the end of the day, we all want you to have the positive experience of owning a puppy that you desire.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Timber, when I read your post, I had flashbacks to my own failed adoption of a young, Great Pyrenees mix, as a first-time dog owner. My story can be found by clicking on my username and then "statistics." I had the best of intentions when I adopted Maru. However, after two months of spending five hours a day attempting to provide him with the training and exercise he needed, I had to conclude that he was not the right dog for me, and I was certainly not the right owner for him. Luckily, I was able to place him in a no-kill shelter and he was quickly adopted by a more suitable couple.

Brian, I commend you for doing research and asking questions before you bring home a puppy. A few thoughts:

a) I hope that you can meet and talk with the owners of LGDs in your community. Go out and try to meet some of these dogs and their owners to see what it's really like to raise one. It's easy to convince yourself that this is the breed for you when doing on-line research. You need to gain more real-world exposure in order to make an informed decision.

2) One lesson I learned with my Great Pyrenees mix is to consider the purpose for which a dog has been bred and then consider whether your own lifestyle sufficiently matches the physical and mental needs of the dog. Owning a big property is not enough. What kind of lifestyle do you lead? How much time and attention can you give your dog on a daily basis? With my Great Pyrenees mix, it became very clear that he needed a job to do all the time, and it wore me out.

3) I know that you are looking for a very "loyal" dog. It's possible to develop close bonds with dogs of all breeds, but the LGD has, as Timber has mentioned above, been bred to be work "independently." My Great Pyrenees mix and I never developed a close bond. Maybe he lacked some formative experiences as a puppy, but maybe his breed led him to be more aloof. I don't know, and Timber could probably shed some light on whether a LGD is what you're looking for.

I hope that you continue to be opinion to the range of opinions that you're receiving here. At the end of the day, we all want you to have the positive experience of owning a puppy that you desire.
Thanks for your reply. Ive done quite alot ''research'' on the internet and Ive also seen people reviewing the tornjak breed and I agree on the fact that the dog is a livestock breed, but if its not raised like that I doubt it will act like a real one. I mean, pitbulls are man made for fights, but it doesnt mean that all pitbulls are gonna eat you on sight.
 

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Thanks for your reply. Ive done quite alot ''research'' on the internet and Ive also seen people reviewing the tornjak breed and I agree on the fact that the dog is a livestock breed, but if its not raised like that I doubt it will act like a real one. I mean, pitbulls are man made for fights, but it doesnt mean that all pitbulls are gonna eat you on sight.
I disagree. My Aussie has never herded sheep, and is from a show line, but is instinctively drawn to movement and tries to control the movement of dogs, people, birds, etc.
My Border Collie has never needed to give sheep "the eye" that BCs use to intimidate sheep into moving, but gave me "eye" for the first time at 8-9 weeks old.

There is a reason you can bank on certain breeds performing in characteristic ways; retrievers love to fetch, sight hounds love to chase, scent hounds love having their nose to the ground. These are features we bred into dogs to use them for whatever purpose we needed. LGDs are very independent. That doesn't mean they ALL ARE, but in general you can rely on those characteristics.

Pitbulls aren't usually people aggressive, but most of the ones I know/have met are at the least dog-selective.
 
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