Dog Forum banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi! I just joined this forum, I'm curious on your opinion on some questions I have.

A little background, first.

I'm a teenager, and I have some mental health issues, so I want a dog that will help me relax, basically be a good emotional support animal.

My older sister has two mini/toy poodles, they are 10 years old (but not super well trained) They likely won't be living at home for much longer, though. They are both male and weigh under 20 lbs. One of them, Oliver, has some health issues such as Addison's disease, degenerative disk disease, yeast infections, and "dietary indiscretion" (he likes to get out of the house and eat all the bad things for him, so we have to take him to the vet a lot) The other one, Finley, just has a sensitive stomach, and is very picky and likes to pee inside when it's raining.

Other pets that other family members own:
Hedgehog
Axolotl (coming soon)
Dogs (mentioned above)
13 chickens
4 fish/snails

My pets:
3 chickens
2 parakeets.

I (and my family) do have a lot of pets.

So, some questions.

1. What breed would be good for:
a. Loyal, sweet, kind, doesn't bark too much.
b. Good esa (possibly service animal)
c. Does well with other pets
d. Is a medium/big dog (40-90lbs, ish) (I know, others might have different opinions, but I LOVE big dogs the most!)

2. How should I ask my parents for a dog, respectfully, but with being clear of how much this would mean to me? Currently, I have a PowerPoint put together on the benefits (and some of the hard things as well) One of the main reasons that they wouldn't want another animal is because they have to take care of my siblings animals a lot, and don't want to have another big responsibility. (Just so we're clear, I understand what a huge responsibility owning a dog is) I've asked in the past for a dog, but they've always said they couldn't take on any more responsibility. I'm planning to take him/her on walks, feed, give medicine (as needed) clean up after, wash, wash him/hers bedding, schedule vet appointments, train, etc. Do you think that will be enough?

3. Does male or female matter a lot?

4. How do you find a good breeder?

5. Are mixed breeds good (like labradoodles, etc)?

6. Anything else to know?


Thank you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,033 Posts
Hi there and welcome to the forum. I hope you will stick around because there are some very helpful people here.

First, i want to say that there is no such thing as a breed of dog that meets your criteria.
Being loyal, sweet and kind depends mostly on how they are treated. Treat the dog with consistent and only kindness, love, and gentle training and the dog will probably be those things. But if you get a puppy, you never know what that dog may turn out to be. Some are hardwired to be friendly, some are not. some are brave, some are naturally fearful. And so on.

Whether or not the dog barks is a matter of training.

Whether or not the dog does well with other pets is also a matter of conditioning and training, although obviously if you have small animals and birds you won't want any kind of hunting breed or a dog with a high prey drive.

Male or female probably doesn't matter.

Mixed breed dogs are great. but if you go to someone who is deliberately breeding mixed breed dogs, it will be very hard to find a good breeder. People who deliberately breed "designer" dogs are most often in it for the money and they do not do health and temperament testing and often do not give the breeding dogs sufficient care to ensure healthy and sound puppies. And again, getting a puppy is taking a chance.

If you want an ESA, any dog that suits you will work for that. But if you are thinking of an actual service dog, that is far more complicated. You need, before you get any dog that you even think you might want to turn into a service dog, to read up a lot on service dogs, the requirements for being able to own one, what they have to be able to do, and what the laws are about it. You can't just get a dog and call that dog a service dog. You have to have a full diagnosis of one of the conditions that is eligible by law for a service dog and you need a doctor to sign off on paperwork stating that you need one. And then it takes an average of two to four years to properly train a service dog, which you cannot do yourself unless you are already a very good dog trainer and have done all the research on it.

I think your best bet is simply to look into your local dog rescue organizations. Find one that has different dogs around the size that you like and make sure it's one that has the dogs in foster care homes. the reason for this is you need to know a lot about the dog before you get him ir her. And the only way to know if that dog will suit you or not is to be able to talk to the people the dog has been living with. Talk to the rescue org. and tell them what you are looking for and why, and see if they can match you up with a dog.

As for your parents, I can;t offer advice because I don't know your home or your parents or your situation with them. But do make sure that they are 100% fully on board with your getting a dog before going any further.

I would also like you to think about some things other than what the dog is like. for instance, how much time will you spend with the dog every day? What activities can you do with the dog? who will be paying for vet care and food and (if needed) grooming? What do you have to offer to a dog?

And, what happens when you leave home to go to college or get a job? Will you for sure take the dog with you? These are important considerations. I am not saying you shouldn't get one! Just that you really have to look at all the ;angles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,033 Posts
Oh...PS: Another thing about service dogs is that they must be a very certain kind of personality to succeed in the training and be true service dogs. This temperament is not necessarily easy to find and most dogs, even those who are bred specially for the purpose, flunk out of the training for one or more of a hundred reasons. Service dogs have to be really spot on experts at what they do. If it turns out that is what you are eligible for and really want, you will need a training organization to help you find the right dog and to train it. This can also cost a lot of money.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you so much for your advice! I guess I meant, when I said I was looking for a dog with "loyal, sweet, kind, doesn't bark much, etc" meant kind of breeds that are less likely to be aggressive and such. Thanks!

Good to know that the people who usually breed designer dogs are more into the money than the well being of the puppies and their parents.

Thanks for the information on service/esa's! I definitely have a couple of the disabilities that are diagnosed, but it definitely is expensive to get a service dog.

I suppose it depends on the breed, but do you think spending 30m-1hr in the morning (grooming, feeding, letting out to use the bathroom, quick morning walk/run around the yard) 1 hour in the afternoon (long walk) and an hour in the evening (just hanging out, brushing him/her teeth, feeding) would be enough? So about 3 hours a day? For activities with the dog, I can:

Play in the yard (throw a ball/Frisbee) and run around
Go on long walks/jogs and go to the dog park
Going to the nearby pond
Occasional trips to the ocean (if the dog doesn't mind going in the car)

My (hopeful) plan is for my parents to pay for the vet and food (while I do not have an independent job), and I'm planning on paying for 50% of the initial dog, and then paying full for the bed, toys, leash, harness, collar, id tags, crate, food bowl, etc. My parents still pay for my adult older sister (who owns the poodles) food, vet, toys, grooming etc.

I'm definitely planning to take the dog with me to college, (either applying for esa, as some colleges allow that) or going to a pet friendly college.


Thank you again for all the amazing information, and things to think about!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
I would start by choosing a breed you are interested in. Then run a search for the AKC breed club in your area. Most breed clubs can recommend responsible breeders in your area and steer you away from puppy mills.

Some breeds shed a LOT. German Shepherds, Norwegian Elkhounds, and some other big hairy breeds seem to blow their coats year round. How do you feel about vacuuming several times a week? Conversely, some of the large non-shedding curly haired breeds aren't as maintenance free as you'd expect. You've already know about getting your sister's little poodles groomed. Imagine the daily time and the monthly expense of grooming a 60 pound dog with that kind of hair.

Individual dogs will have differences in temperament and health. If you can find one, I'd suggest going with a breeder who assigns puppies based on temperament instead of one who lets each buyer choose a puppy. ("I want that puppy because he's got a spot shaped like a heart and he ran right up to me" is a bad way to choose a puppy.) Some breeders do Volhard temperament testing when the litter is 7 weeks old. These test results help the breeder match puppies with the best families. For instance, you'd want the bold, high energy puppy to go home with the person who wants to do do agility and dock diving competitions. You'd want the laid back puppy going home with the family with small children.

It is good to find out which health tests are recommended for a breed, and stick to breeders who are performing those tests. The Ofa.org website has a list of tests suggested for most breeds. You can search for the registered name of a dog to see if the owners have posted test results. Chances are that a breeder recommended by a breed club will perform health testing, but it is always wise to make sure.

In general I would avoid crossbreds like labradoodles. Too many of them are bred by people who are simply riding the current fad. If you absolutely have your heart set on a labradoodle, look up cobberdog breeders. There are a handful of dedicated cobberdog breeders who do health testing and are working towards developing the cross into a true breed suitable for use as a service dog. There is definitely variation in the quality of the breeders, but at least there is a goal beyond breeding a poodle-like dog that dudes are willing to take out in public.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
470 Posts
You've gotten good info, but I think a female should be a preference since the other dogs are males. Usually male-female pairs, then male-male, and cautiously female- female are recommended. Not set in stone, but a general consideration.

Foster-based rescues are great, and some allow a 2-week trial period as well. Putting in an application earlier can really help them make a good match in the future or present. And, older dogs +3 usually, are more settled and don't need monthly puppy vaccines.

If you are really looking at breeders, there is a list of questions to ask.

Would training your sister's poodle(s) to a certain level or number of tricks maybe help if your parents balk?

But, an eye out for a rough collie or mix might be a lovely option if you don't mind the fur.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you so much for all of the amazing information! So far, I'm really interested in Golden Retrievers and Labradors (my dad had a lab when he was younger, and I've heard him say how much he loves them) and goldens are amazing, but they do have some health issues...

I'm planning to talk to my parents in about a week, and then I'll give them a lot of time to think about it. Thanks again for all the info!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,137 Posts
You have had some good advice already. I suggest this to a lot of people in your situation.

For the next month, act like you have an adult dog. Get up an hour earlier than normal, take an hour long walk. Do the same in the evening after work - and come straight home from school; no shopping, gym, socialising. Do this every day, without fail, regardless of the weather.

Be aware of the season, and remind yourself every morning that for several months of the year you will be doing this in the cold and dark.

That will give you a good insight into some of the commitment you will need to make.

Don't think about what a dog will bring to your family, think about what your family can offer to a dog.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
1,409 Posts
Hi! I just joined this forum, I'm curious on your opinion on some questions I have.

A little background, first.

I'm a teenager, and I have some mental health issues, so I want a dog that will help me relax, basically be a good emotional support animal.

My older sister has two mini/toy poodles, they are 10 years old (but not super well trained) They likely won't be living at home for much longer, though. They are both male and weigh under 20 lbs. One of them, Oliver, has some health issues such as Addison's disease, degenerative disk disease, yeast infections, and "dietary indiscretion" (he likes to get out of the house and eat all the bad things for him, so we have to take him to the vet a lot) The other one, Finley, just has a sensitive stomach, and is very picky and likes to pee inside when it's raining.

Other pets that other family members own:
Hedgehog
Axolotl (coming soon)
Dogs (mentioned above)
13 chickens
4 fish/snails

My pets:
3 chickens
2 parakeets.

I (and my family) do have a lot of pets.

So, some questions.

1. What breed would be good for:
a. Loyal, sweet, kind, doesn't bark too much.
b. Good esa (possibly service animal)
c. Does well with other pets
d. Is a medium/big dog (40-90lbs, ish) (I know, others might have different opinions, but I LOVE big dogs the most!)

2. How should I ask my parents for a dog, respectfully, but with being clear of how much this would mean to me? Currently, I have a PowerPoint put together on the benefits (and some of the hard things as well) One of the main reasons that they wouldn't want another animal is because they have to take care of my siblings animals a lot, and don't want to have another big responsibility. (Just so we're clear, I understand what a huge responsibility owning a dog is) I've asked in the past for a dog, but they've always said they couldn't take on any more responsibility. I'm planning to take him/her on walks, feed, give medicine (as needed) clean up after, wash, wash him/hers bedding, schedule vet appointments, train, etc. Do you think that will be enough?

3. Does male or female matter a lot?

4. How do you find a good breeder?

5. Are mixed breeds good (like labradoodles, etc)?

6. Anything else to know?


Thank you!
Hi, and welcome to the forum.

You've been given a lot of excellent advice already, and I'm not going to repeat what they've said. I just want to expand on something:

You mention that you've already asked your parents in the past and they've said No. If your parents say no again, and you live at home, then the answer is no. and it wouldn't be responsible of us to help you try to convince them. Your parents know you best - they know how responsible you are, how likely you are to stick to your end of the bargain, or how likely you are to get bored and leave the majority of the work to them.

My (hopeful) plan is for my parents to pay for the vet and food (while I do not have an independent job), and I'm planning on paying for 50% of the initial dog, and then paying full for the bed, toys, leash, harness, collar, id tags, crate, food bowl, etc
Another red flag here is that by your own admission, you want your parents to foot the vet and food bills and half of the cost of the dog itself, while you pay for the fun stuff - that, by definition, makes the dog their dog - not yours, because they're the ones paying for it.

You also say your parents are already paying for your sister's two dogs - why would they want to foot the majority of bills for a third?

My advice then, would be to wait until you're older, until your life has settled down, you have a steady job, a place of your own and can afford and dare for your own dog.

I'm sorry - it's not a No - just a Not Yet. Unless you parents want a dog, but that's different.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,033 Posts
I suppose it depends on the breed, but do you think spending 30m-1hr in the morning (grooming, feeding, letting out to use the bathroom, quick morning walk/run around the yard) 1 hour in the afternoon (long walk) and an hour in the evening (just hanging out, brushing him/her teeth, feeding) would be enough? So about 3 hours a day? For activities with the dog, I can:

Play in the yard (throw a ball/Frisbee) and run around
Go on long walks/jogs and go to the dog park
Going to the nearby pond
Occasional trips to the ocean (if the dog doesn't mind going in the car)
Yes, it depends on the breed. But what you are describing here would not be enough for a high energy breed like a golden. You are talking about one quick run around the yard, and one hour walk in the evening. that will not be even close to enough activity for such a high energy dog, and the result will be that the dog may decide on how to use all that extra energy, which will probably be in ways your family doesn't really like much. You say three hours a day, but the active part sounds only like maybe an hour and a quarter., with most of that being only at a walk, not more than that.

I also note that you have not mentioned training. Who is going to train this dog, and how? As a teenager, how much experience do you have with training a dog? Have you trained a dog, or dealt with problem behaviors in a dog? Do you have the means to take the dog to a training class or hire a trainer if needed? Do you know what to do if the dog starts a behavior that you don't want, such as chewing the couch, jumping all over people, pulling hard on the leash, pooping in the laundry room or digging up the garden? Who is going to look after the dog and do the training that will be necessary during the day while you are at school? If you get a puppy, who is going to watch the puppy like a hawk to keep him or her out of trouble and do the housetraining while you are at school? And so on.

Goldens require extensive grooming or they shed like crazy. They are lovely dogs, but the coat needs a lot of care. Both goldens and labs are large dogs with extremely high energy. They need a lot of physical exercise and an equal amount of mental exercise in the form of training.

I am again only asking these questions because you need to answer them for yourself before going forward. I don't think that you should necessarily wait to get a dog until you leave home, as long as your parents get on board 100% and you are truly able to do what needs to be done for the dog. You just need to think about everything, is all. Especially about how many hours you have to give the dog. If you are going to be raising and/or training a high energy dog it basically means you will need to forget about extra-curricular activities like sports or going out with friends or clubs, because that time will be needed for the dog. If you truly can provide all the dog needs and your parents are fine with it, then it will be OK. But if you are hesitant about any of this it might be better to wait until you are in a position to spend a lot more time with the dog yourself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You have had some good advice already. I suggest this to a lot of people in your situation.

For the next month, act like you have an adult dog. Get up an hour earlier than normal, take an hour long walk. Do the same in the evening after work - and come straight home from school; no shopping, gym, socialising. Do this every day, without fail, regardless of the weather.

Be aware of the season, and remind yourself every morning that for several months of the year you will be doing this in the cold and dark.

That will give you a good insight into some of the commitment you will need to make.

Don't think about what a dog will bring to your family, think about what your family can offer to a dog.
Thank you! In the past few weeks, I've started getting up a 6:30 instead of 7:30. I go to a bit of an alternative school, so I come home at 2:00 usually (though some days I don't have school, and some I come home at noon), and about 90% of the time, someone else is home.

I don't really do any extracurricular activities, besides horseback riding (which is in the mornings) but for basically skipping the things like shopping, gym, socializing, etc, would it still be ok for me to do therapy? (it's online)

Hi, and welcome to the forum.

You've been given a lot of excellent advice already, and I'm not going to repeat what they've said. I just want to expand on something:

You mention that you've already asked your parents in the past and they've said No. If your parents say no again, and you live at home, then the answer is no. and it wouldn't be responsible of us to help you try to convince them. Your parents know you best - they know how responsible you are, how likely you are to stick to your end of the bargain, or how likely you are to get bored and leave the majority of the work to them.


Another red flag here is that by your own admission, you want your parents to foot the vet and food bills and half of the cost of the dog itself, while you pay for the fun stuff - that, by definition, makes the dog their dog - not yours, because they're the ones paying for it.

You also say your parents are already paying for your sister's two dogs - why would they want to foot the majority of bills for a third?

My advice then, would be to wait until you're older, until your life has settled down, you have a steady job, a place of your own and can afford and dare for your own dog.

I'm sorry - it's not a No - just a Not Yet. Unless you parents want a dog, but that's different.
Thank you! Do you think it would help if I offered to pay for the food as well? I just don't know that I can afford vet bills as well, because I don't have a job, and I don't get allowance.

Yes, it depends on the breed. But what you are describing here would not be enough for a high energy breed like a golden. You are talking about one quick run around the yard, and one hour walk in the evening. that will not be even close to enough activity for such a high energy dog, and the result will be that the dog may decide on how to use all that extra energy, which will probably be in ways your family doesn't really like much. You say three hours a day, but the active part sounds only like maybe an hour and a quarter., with most of that being only at a walk, not more than that.

I also note that you have not mentioned training. Who is going to train this dog, and how? As a teenager, how much experience do you have with training a dog? Have you trained a dog, or dealt with problem behaviors in a dog? Do you have the means to take the dog to a training class or hire a trainer if needed? Do you know what to do if the dog starts a behavior that you don't want, such as chewing the couch, jumping all over people, pulling hard on the leash, pooping in the laundry room or digging up the garden? Who is going to look after the dog and do the training that will be necessary during the day while you are at school? If you get a puppy, who is going to watch the puppy like a hawk to keep him or her out of trouble and do the housetraining while you are at school? And so on.

Goldens require extensive grooming or they shed like crazy. They are lovely dogs, but the coat needs a lot of care. Both goldens and labs are large dogs with extremely high energy. They need a lot of physical exercise and an equal amount of mental exercise in the form of training.

I am again only asking these questions because you need to answer them for yourself before going forward. I don't think that you should necessarily wait to get a dog until you leave home, as long as your parents get on board 100% and you are truly able to do what needs to be done for the dog. You just need to think about everything, is all. Especially about how many hours you have to give the dog. If you are going to be raising and/or training a high energy dog it basically means you will need to forget about extra-curricular activities like sports or going out with friends or clubs, because that time will be needed for the dog. If you truly can provide all the dog needs and your parents are fine with it, then it will be OK. But if you are hesitant about any of this it might be better to wait until you are in a position to spend a lot more time with the dog yourself.

I can jog to, how much exercise would the dog need at a jog? I can commit to about 3 hours a day, and my twin, (we're hoping the dog would be ours to share) could also take the dog on another 1 hours jog too. Would that be enough exercise?

I'll admit that I've never trained a dog before, so therefore have no experience. I was planning on doing training with a professional trainer, and learning as the dog learned. I have not yet thought about who will train the dog while I'm at school... thanks for putting that on my radar!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Ian Dunbar's website has some good free downloads describing how to select, socialize, and train a puppy. Even if you don't follow the method exactly, it gives you a good general idea of just how much work goes into properly rearing a puppy. Big dogs are more demanding. It's not because big dogs are harder to train. Rather, people have much less patience with a big dog when it misbehaves. When a 12 pound toy poodle jumps on someone the response is "Ooh, how cute!" When my 70 pound standard poodle jumps on someone the response is, "@#$%!"

Puppies of any breed will be much more demanding & destructive than an adult. For three months I woke up in the middle of the night to take my puppy outside to pee. (Pro tip - get the puppy in summer, so you aren't going out at 1 AM in a blizzard wearing slippers and a baggy sleep shirt.) During the day I took him outside every hour or two. I was very happy to work from home; otherwise I would have needed to use a doggy daycare service.

Count on at least 18 months of things getting destroyed. My puppy isn't a particularly naughty puppy, but we don't always supervise him as closely as we should. How my year has gone with my puppy:
$3000 in emergency vet bills from eating things that didn't agree with him. Sticks, acorns, a plastic wrapper, and a beef trachea purchased as a treat all made him sick.​
$2000 in chewed clothing, eyeglasses, footgear, and rugs. My winter jacket exploded in a cloud of feathers when the puppy playfully leapt at me and caught it with his sharp little milk teeth. Right now I'm down to one pair of wearable slippers, one pair of Ugg boots, and a pair of LL Bean duck boots; all my sneakers have been removed from my closet and destroyed. The slippers, having been rescued from puppy jaws in the nick of time, now live in the bathroom sink when I am not wearing them since the puppy can open the closet door.​
Household carpets have been shampooed multiple times due to the puppy sneakily escaping his pen before being potty trained and diarrhea episodes after he was potty trained.​
He's currently in a phase where he likes to destroy stuffed animals. Any stuffed animal with sentimental value to me now sits on the top shelf of a book case. The floor is strewn with fiberfill, and the heads of decapitated toys are lined up by the door. It looks like someone is doing dark rituals involving sacrificial teddy bears.​
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,101 Posts
Thank you! In the past few weeks, I've started getting up a 6:30 instead of 7:30. I go to a bit of an alternative school, so I come home at 2:00 usually (though some days I don't have school, and some I come home at noon), and about 90% of the time, someone else is home.

I don't really do any extracurricular activities, besides horseback riding (which is in the mornings) but for basically skipping the things like shopping, gym, socializing, etc, would it still be ok for me to do therapy? (it's online)



Thank you! Do you think it would help if I offered to pay for the food as well? I just don't know that I can afford vet bills as well, because I don't have a job, and I don't get allowance.




I can jog to, how much exercise would the dog need at a jog? I can commit to about 3 hours a day, and my twin, (we're hoping the dog would be ours to share) could also take the dog on another 1 hours jog too. Would that be enough exercise?

I'll admit that I've never trained a dog before, so therefore have no experience. I was planning on doing training with a professional trainer, and learning as the dog learned. I have not yet thought about who will train the dog while I'm at school... thanks for putting that on my radar!
Hi there.
Just an FYI: Young puppies will need to relieve themselves every 2-3 hr..24x7, and don't have a set schedule yet.
A new puppy will require vaccinations and deworming. While not a fortune, it is still a substantial outlay of $$.
Also it is common practice to neuter/spay a puppy in the USA and that is not cheap. Figure about $300 for a male and about $500 for a female, depending on your location.

The really bad part is that covid has caused a huge backlog for vets, and many are not even taking on new clients. I have been an established customer with my vet for over 10 yrs and had to wait a month for my last appointment for a yearly checkup and booster shots They currently take care of my 3 dogs.
If/when you get a dog, I suggest getting a vet in tow first.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
1,409 Posts
Thank you! Do you think it would help if I offered to pay for the food as well? I just don't know that I can afford vet bills as well, because I don't have a job, and I don't get allowance.
No, I don't think offering to pay for its food will help convince your parents, and as I said, it wouldn't be responsible of us to advise you on ways to get around them and convince them to say yes. No means no.

If your parents say no, take it on the chin and accept that you will not be getting a dog until you are independent and in your own home.

You already have a lot of pets as a family - including two dogs. That's a lot more than many can afford, and each one is a luxury.

If/when you get a dog, I suggest getting a vet in tow first.
That exact same advice was on our local news programme about a month ago.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,033 Posts
Thank you! In the past few weeks, I've started getting up a 6:30 instead of 7:30. I go to a bit of an alternative school, so I come home at 2:00 usually (though some days I don't have school, and some I come home at noon), and about 90% of the time, someone else is home.

I don't really do any extracurricular activities, besides horseback riding (which is in the mornings) but for basically skipping the things like shopping, gym, socializing, etc, would it still be ok for me to do therapy? (it's online)



Thank you! Do you think it would help if I offered to pay for the food as well? I just don't know that I can afford vet bills as well, because I don't have a job, and I don't get allowance.




I can jog to, how much exercise would the dog need at a jog? I can commit to about 3 hours a day, and my twin, (we're hoping the dog would be ours to share) could also take the dog on another 1 hours jog too. Would that be enough exercise?

I'll admit that I've never trained a dog before, so therefore have no experience. I was planning on doing training with a professional trainer, and learning as the dog learned. I have not yet thought about who will train the dog while I'm at school... thanks for putting that on my radar!
There's no way for any of us to know what would or would not help you to convince your parents to let you have a dog. these questions you need to be asking yourself, not us, because we do not know your parents as I said before. Their reason for not wanting you to have a dog, if they don't, may not have to do with money. Just ask them, and then accept their answer.

Not only would you want to get a vet lined up, as suggested above, but also research trainers in the area, what their methods are and how much they charge. Make sure that you only plan, if you get a dog, to go to those who use exclusively positive methods in their training. This means no choke collars, no e-collars or prongs, no leash jerks, no scolding or yelling or hitting or bodily manipulation in the training.

As for how much exercise, it really will depend on the dog. some need more than others do, and that will remain to be seen. but if you go out and get a high energy dog like a golden, expect it to be a bit of a wild ride for the first two years or so because those dogs mature very slowly and need a lot of attention.

there's really no way for anyone here to determine or tell you with authority whether or not you should have a dog, because we are not there. It sounds to me as if you have all the right intentions, but the most important thing with something like getting a companion animal is often the timing of it. this may be the right time, or it may not be. I do wish you good luck, either way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Hi! I just joined this forum, I'm curious on your opinion on some questions I have.

A little background, first.

I'm a teenager, and I have some mental health issues, so I want a dog that will help me relax, basically be a good emotional support animal.

My older sister has two mini/toy poodles, they are 10 years old (but not super well trained) They likely won't be living at home for much longer, though. They are both male and weigh under 20 lbs. One of them, Oliver, has some health issues such as Addison's disease, degenerative disk disease, yeast infections, and "dietary indiscretion" (he likes to get out of the house and eat all the bad things for him, so we have to take him to the vet a lot) The other one, Finley, just has a sensitive stomach, and is very picky and likes to pee inside when it's raining.

Other pets that other family members own:
Hedgehog
Axolotl (coming soon)
Dogs (mentioned above)
13 chickens
4 fish/snails

My pets:
3 chickens
2 parakeets.

I (and my family) do have a lot of pets.

So, some questions.

1. What breed would be good for:
a. Loyal, sweet, kind, doesn't bark too much.
b. Good esa (possibly service animal)
c. Does well with other pets
d. Is a medium/big dog (40-90lbs, ish) (I know, others might have different opinions, but I LOVE big dogs the most!)

2. How should I ask my parents for a dog, respectfully, but with being clear of how much this would mean to me? Currently, I have a PowerPoint put together on the benefits (and some of the hard things as well) One of the main reasons that they wouldn't want another animal is because they have to take care of my siblings animals a lot, and don't want to have another big responsibility. (Just so we're clear, I understand what a huge responsibility owning a dog is) I've asked in the past for a dog, but they've always said they couldn't take on any more responsibility. I'm planning to take him/her on walks, feed, give medicine (as needed) clean up after, wash, wash him/hers bedding, schedule vet appointments, train, etc. Do you think that will be enough?

3. Does male or female matter a lot?

4. How do you find a good breeder?

5. Are mixed breeds good (like labradoodles, etc)?

6. Anything else to know?


Thank you!
Whatever the breed or training will be determined by the dog! Yep, makes no matter because the bond will be already be understood by the dog. They read us much better than we read them! Trust your gut and the dog! I would have never taken a Pitbull by choice, but when I had no choice, I welcomed that dog that would put herself in front of me before letting me be hurt. The spiritual and emotional trust is far greater than anything another person could say/advise to me to get. The bottom line - for me- is that I needed to let my dog demonstrate to me their level of loyalty, and believe me it happens really quickly! Good luck, and don't forget to pray about it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
You’ve received some excellent advice from people who really know what they’re talking about. I’ve had dogs all my life and you have to commit yourself fully to training a puppy, and caring for it which in some cases can be quite a job. My question is that when you’re in school where will your dog be? You can’t keep a dog crated for several hours a day especially a small puppy and you will be depending on your parents to care for it at those times.
A purebred dog can be extremely expensive running into thousands of dollars. My son bought a labradoodle from a breeder who breeds this particular dog and it cost him $1700 just to purchase not counting the neutering, the vaccines etc. You don’t have a job and you don’t have an allowance so I’m wondering how on earth are you going to pay your share? Your dog is going to need a lot more than just vet care. If you get a large dog the size that you stated you wanted, you need to be able to feed it properly and that can be expensive. My suggestion to you would be to just wait until you can pay some of the cost and until you can commit to giving a particular high energy breed of dog the right amount of exercise it needs. I would strongly suggest going to a shelter, or better yet find a private foster program where you can keep the dog for a trial period to see if you’re a match. Your first hurdle is to make sure your parents are completely on board with this no ifs, ands or maybes. This is a life you’re dealing with and this life deserve the very best you can give it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Hi! I just joined this forum, I'm curious on your opinion on some questions I have.

A little background, first.

I'm a teenager, and I have some mental health issues, so I want a dog that will help me relax, basically be a good emotional support animal.

My older sister has two mini/toy poodles, they are 10 years old (but not super well trained) They likely won't be living at home for much longer, though. They are both male and weigh under 20 lbs. One of them, Oliver, has some health issues such as Addison's disease, degenerative disk disease, yeast infections, and "dietary indiscretion" (he likes to get out of the house and eat all the bad things for him, so we have to take him to the vet a lot) The other one, Finley, just has a sensitive stomach, and is very picky and likes to pee inside when it's raining.

Other pets that other family members own:
Hedgehog
Axolotl (coming soon)
Dogs (mentioned above)
13 chickens
4 fish/snails

My pets:
3 chickens
2 parakeets.

I (and my family) do have a lot of pets.

So, some questions.

1. What breed would be good for:
a. Loyal, sweet, kind, doesn't bark too much.
b. Good esa (possibly service animal)
c. Does well with other pets
d. Is a medium/big dog (40-90lbs, ish) (I know, others might have different opinions, but I LOVE big dogs the most!)

2. How should I ask my parents for a dog, respectfully, but with being clear of how much this would mean to me? Currently, I have a PowerPoint put together on the benefits (and some of the hard things as well) One of the main reasons that they wouldn't want another animal is because they have to take care of my siblings animals a lot, and don't want to have another big responsibility. (Just so we're clear, I understand what a huge responsibility owning a dog is) I've asked in the past for a dog, but they've always said they couldn't take on any more responsibility. I'm planning to take him/her on walks, feed, give medicine (as needed) clean up after, wash, wash him/hers bedding, schedule vet appointments, train, etc. Do you think that will be enough?

3. Does male or female matter a lot?

4. How do you find a good breeder?

5. Are mixed breeds good (like labradoodles, etc)?

6. Anything else to know?


Thank you!
Hi, I have mental health issues as well. I have a Bi-Polar disorder and mild and medicated schizophrenia. I can't see where you mention your particular issues and that's your right. If some of what I say here can be of help great.

Best dog I had was a slobbery drooling Mastiff X. He knew exactly when I was down or hyper and would come and rest his head on my leg and look up at me in a personal and knowing way that calmed me down or lifted me up. All my worry would disappear.(almost) Saved my life so many times that dog before I was finally diagnosed.

When you are close like that, his death wrecked me. I'd advise you prepare for, when that time comes just as much as enjoying the time now.


How do you approach your parents? Breathe, have the information at hand(memorized and comprehended) I would always ask to foster some dogs to see how you will benefit from the right pairing, and when your dog finds you, you will know. Throw away the power point. You need to understand what the right dog would do for you, If your just wanting a dog badly and this is your idea to get one, please, don't.

When I got Oscar, I walked him, everywhere, teaching him stop back wait oh everything I could think of. Walk change direction just getting him to be at one with me. I think that had a lot to do with how we bonded. I recommend you do that.

Here's that hard part, you can't take him to University, Army, Oversea's and a million other places you will go as you grow up, a dogs for life, if you form a good bond with him now, and you leave, .... something to think about.

Hope I help in some way.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top