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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here’s a fun challenge for dog lovers out there. We recently got our dog’s DNA test back and would love to see if anyone can give it a guess as to what he was. According to his DNA test, he has one purebred parent with the other parent being a mix of 4 breeds. Go ahead and give it your best guess for the major breed (bonus points if you can guess any of the others!) good luck! Also some hints: he has a curled back tail and is about 55 pounds (mostly fluff except in the summer).
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Very unique and handsome dog you got there! I'll take a WAG and say the purebred parent was a Tennessee tree hound (for the brindle color), the other parent, him, some Collie, some Chow, some Pitt (cause they all have a little), and Golden Retriever.

How'd I do?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Very unique and handsome dog you got there! I'll take a WAG and say the purebred parent was a Tennessee tree hound (for the brindle color), the other parent, him, some Collie, some Chow, some Pitt (cause they all have a little), and Golden Retriever.

How'd I do?
So SO close! We also thought he had chow in him but turns out his purebred parent was a Norwegian elkhound. The mixed parent did have pitt and golden retriever though so you got those two right! The other parts of the mix are boxer (probably where the brindle came from) and staffy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Leonberger, shepherd, catahoula
Everyone we meet always thinks he’s some type of German shepherd and for a while I was thinking it too!! Turns out his main breed is Norwegian elkhound and the mixes are golden retriever, Pitt, boxer, and staffy!
 

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The elkhound part is surprising! They are typically shorter in length and sort of blockier in build...but that would explain the curl in the tail too. I'm sort of surprised that pitt is differentiated from a Staffordshire, since they're essentially the same breed.

That was fun though, thanks for setting us all straight!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The elkhound part is surprising! They are typically shorter in length and sort of blockier in build...but that would explain the curl in the tail too. I'm sort of surprised that pitt is differentiated from a Staffordshire, since they're essentially the same breed.

That was fun though, thanks for setting us all straight!
Yes, when his coat is in full bloom he somewhat resembles their build but the only real elkhound traits are the beady eyes and tail😂. I also didn’t even know staffies were a thing until I got his dna results back!
 

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. I'm sort of surprised that pitt is differentiated from a Staffordshire, since they're essentially the same breed.
I think the difference is that the Staffordshire Terrier is a recognized breed, whereas pit bull is a description of that type of dog, and includes other similar breeds. So, while a Staffordshire Terrier is a pit bull, not all pit bulls are Staffordshire Terriers. Not really a strong distinction, especially considering the similarity of appearance, and it's hard to say how a DNA result would come out with Staffordshire in particular, but then I don't know anything about DNA.
 

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Curious now, I looked it up on akc.org and found that there are 2 recognized breeds of Staffordshire Terriers, the American Staffordshire Terrier, and the Staffordshire Bull Terrier. So using their tool I did a comparison of these breeds.

Apparantly the American version has been bred to be more trainable and better as a family dog than the SBT.
 

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I don't know much about the American one but the Staffordshire Bull Terrier is one of the most common breeds over here. They became very popular a few years back, particularly with young men who wanted to look tough, because of how they look. But another very important reason for their popularity is that despite their hard image, they are highly biddable and are very easy dogs. They tend not to be very dog friendly but with people, they are generally real love bugs.
 

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I don't know much about the American one but the Staffordshire Bull Terrier is one of the most common breeds over here. They became very popular a few years back, particularly with young men who wanted to look tough, because of how they look. But another very important reason for their popularity is that despite their hard image, they are highly biddable and are very easy dogs. They tend not to be very dog friendly but with people, they are generally real love bugs.
I think the same is true of the pit bulls here in terms of how they became popular and why they remain so. Sadly, they are also the most common dogs to find in shelters - you see cage after cage all down the rows, all with pit bulls.
 

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I think the same is true of the pit bulls here in terms of how they became popular and why they remain so. Sadly, they are also the most common dogs to find in shelters - you see cage after cage all down the rows, all with pit bulls.
Yes, that's just like staffies here :(
 
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