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Discussion Starter #1
Have you guys ever heard of The Yellow Dog Project (TYDP)? Do you know what the yellow bandana or ribbon on a dog's leash means?

I really love this idea and want to know who knows about it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
New to me. I googled it and found this. TYDP/About
It is an amazing idea if people know what it means. :)

I have a highly reactive dog due to his nervousness around people but he is super dog friendly. When people give him the space he needs be it at the dog park or just on a walk, he is much more open to appoaching them and trying to make new friends then he would be if they were to try to reach out and pet him.

Trucker has a yellow bow tie collar he wears sometimes, a yellow bandana for other, or sometimes a yellow jacket and always a large yellow bow is on his leash.

I am now sure that many people know what the project is but it is a wonderful idea and keeps dogs and owners safe.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
 

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I thought it was a good idea but I've heard there hasn't been enough promotion of it. I heard someone say once that the only people who've actually heard of it and know what the yellow ribbon means are people who would already be respectful of the dog's space and owner's wishes anyways, which is a valid point imo.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I thought it was a good idea but I've heard there hasn't been enough promotion of it. I heard someone say once that the only people who've actually heard of it and know what the yellow ribbon means are people who would already be respectful of the dog's space and owner's wishes anyways, which is a valid point imo.
I agree, which makes me sad as I have a "yellow" dog. Someone actually had the nerve to tell me the my dog's yellow ribbon meant he was aggressive and I either need to have him muzzled or not bring him out. Trucker is not aggressive at all when he gets scared but very submissive and is making huge strides due to people giving him the space he needs. He will let you know with a low growl or one long bawk that you have made him feel cornered if you do not listen to me when I ask you to please step back and give him some space or if you don't take his multiple body signals.

But think this wouldn't be needed it people we educated on body body language, respectful of people's and dogs space, and followed the leash laws.
 

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in germany some dog schools to support this, but some also say it is a two edged sword because some people think this gives people the right to say you can't be at certain places with your dog, because "they could be dangerous".
^^"
 

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It would be cool if this was a more "mainstream" thing that everybody knew about. I didn't know about this particular project, per se, but I do know of at least one company that produces colored harnesses and leashes with clear words. Green for a friendly dog, yellow for a dog that needs caution or space, and red for a dog that is badly reactive or aggressive.

It always reminded me of what we do with colored ribbons in horses' tails during shows to show if they're green, for sale, kick, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It would be cool if this was a more "mainstream" thing that everybody knew about. I didn't know about this particular project, per se, but I do know of at least one company that produces colored harnesses and leashes with clear words. Green for a friendly dog, yellow for a dog that needs caution or space, and red for a dog that is badly reactive or aggressive.

It always reminded me of what we do with colored ribbons in horses' tails during shows to show if they're green, for sale, kick, etc.
It's exactly that idea :). I generally rely on the fact that Trucker fully trusts me and only me and therefore has about 80 to 90% recall depending on how scared he is. When he doesn't come it is because he is so frozen I am most likely going to have to carry my 57lb dog out of the situation. He wears his Thundershirt in public which more then actually calms him it let's other people know he is nervous not agressive.
 

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I have to admit, I'm not a fan. Maybe, as a long-time supporter of reactive dogs and their owners, I should be...it's just not my favorite initiative.

I don't like the yellow ribbon project because it's complicated. It requires that the owner figure out that their dog needs space (and thus, puts the appropriate color ribbon on), and that the entire general public take the time to learn a color-coded system for interpreting dog clothes. Plus, most dogs are not permanently "green" or "yellow" or "red" -- their reactions depend on the situation.

It seems easier to me to just teach everyone "don't pet a strange dog without permission." If we teach people that it's rude to pet dogs without permission, then we're just asking them to be polite. Which seems like a friendly thing to do! Asking people to watch out for "those dogs" who wear yellow, and avoid them, means asking people to treat "those dogs" as special cases. When really, all dogs deserve space, until they indicate otherwise. Not knowing how to accurately decode dog clothing seems understandable, but not knowing to respect dogs' space just seems rude.

I've owned a very seriously reactive dog. My current dog is not reactive (by my standards, anyway), but will certainly bark at things that surprise her, including people. With either of my dogs, past or present, I think it's my responsibility to keep them under threshold and away from problematic situations. I don't mean that it's always easy -- things surprise me too, and I had a long learning curve to figure out how to manage and live with a severely fearful dog, with plenty of mistakes along the way. But I still think it's easier to control my own behavior, and thus, manage my dog appropriately, than to try to control the behavior of every stranger I meet.

But yeah, I wish everyone would treat every dog as though it was wearing a giant yellow ribbon. They could interact if invited, and otherwise just give dogs space (and be given space in turn), and I'd be a whole lot happier!
 

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I have to admit, I'm not a fan. Maybe, as a long-time supporter of reactive dogs and their owners, I should be...it's just not my favorite initiative.

I don't like the yellow ribbon project because it's complicated. It requires that the owner figure out that their dog needs space (and thus, puts the appropriate color ribbon on), and that the entire general public take the time to learn a color-coded system for interpreting dog clothes. Plus, most dogs are not permanently "green" or "yellow" or "red" -- their reactions depend on the situation.

It seems easier to me to just teach everyone "don't pet a strange dog without permission." If we teach people that it's rude to pet dogs without permission, then we're just asking them to be polite. Which seems like a friendly thing to do! Asking people to watch out for "those dogs" who wear yellow, and avoid them, means asking people to treat "those dogs" as special cases. When really, all dogs deserve space, until they indicate otherwise. Not knowing how to accurately decode dog clothing seems understandable, but not knowing to respect dogs' space just seems rude.

I've owned a very seriously reactive dog. My current dog is not reactive (by my standards, anyway), but will certainly bark at things that surprise her, including people. With either of my dogs, past or present, I think it's my responsibility to keep them under threshold and away from problematic situations. I don't mean that it's always easy -- things surprise me too, and I had a long learning curve to figure out how to manage and live with a severely fearful dog, with plenty of mistakes along the way. But I still think it's easier to control my own behavior, and thus, manage my dog appropriately, than to try to control the behavior of every stranger I meet.

But yeah, I wish everyone would treat every dog as though it was wearing a giant yellow ribbon. They could interact if invited, and otherwise just give dogs space (and be given space in turn), and I'd be a whole lot happier!
I agree with you. the project is only as good as it is presented to the public.
generally i think stuff like teaching children in school and kindergarten, that thesy shouldn't contact a dog directly without asking the owner and the owner say okay is more important, since if everyone did that you wouldn't need yellow ribbons.
it can be another precaution though, when the dog is in heat or recovering from a surgery for example.
You don't have to wear it all the time, but it is practical in certain situations.
Like wearing muzzle...my dog doesn't bite, but when it keeps people away in situations that are stressful for the dog andso the people don't stress him even more, I happily let him wear it.
here in Germany around 45-60% of the dog owners probably heard about the Gulahund project, so that already a lot more people that wouldn't directly let their dogs approach such a dog. which is great.
there's one colour (yellow), so it not complicated in my opinion and the times I'Ve seen it in use, it as mostly for elderly, disabled and sick dogs... or females in heat. Seldomly I'Ve seen it in use for aggression or reactivity.
sancho doesn't wear a yellow ribbon though...he's so often in some kind of muddy puddles, that it wouldn't stay yelow for long. ^^"
 

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I wish everyone knew about this! Cosmo doesn't like to be approached he would rather approach on his own terms. People walk right up and are shocked when he ducks away and squeezes behind me. I've been asked if he was abused but I've never abused him he's just nervous around strangers and it's been a real training issue for him.

It's just so annoying when people assume he's a dog that loves everyone because that's what a lot of people seem to expect in dogs. I've also been asked "does he bite" a lot when I ask people not to pet him and I ALWAYS get dirty looks from parents when I tell their darling child not to run at him or pet him because he's nervous.
 

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I wish everyone knew about this! Cosmo doesn't like to be approached he would rather approach on his own terms. People walk right up and are shocked when he ducks away and squeezes behind me. I've been asked if he was abused but I've never abused him he's just nervous around strangers and it's been a real training issue for him.

It's just so annoying when people assume he's a dog that loves everyone because that's what a lot of people seem to expect in dogs. I've also been asked "does he bite" a lot when I ask people not to pet him and I ALWAYS get dirty looks from parents when I tell their darling child not to run at him or pet him because he's nervous.
weirdly often the kids know better how to approach a dog than the parents. :)
Sancho likes children, so children are allowed, when they ask nicely.
if not I stop them before coming close and explain it to them.
the problem is more adults that are not used to dogs and bow over him which he thinks is very dominant... and dog owners, that think it is funny to let their intact and very interested male to a female in heat.
and with this the Gulahund project at least helps a bit.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
@SnackRat I would love for people to just respect every dogs spaces, this would be ideal. But they don't and I am slowly working with Trucker to learn that I am his protector and will not EVER let anyone beat him ever again. So I am not willing to lock him up and wait for this to happen nor am I willing to let people run up to him and scare him. So even though I don't 100% agree with the program I am trying it out because in my mind something is better than nothing.
@cos My dog has been abused, for what the vet says from the scars and scar tissue build up most likely for when he was a puppy. He is making amazing strides towards trust of strangers but having them run up to him does not help. He needs time to watch them and how they interact with other dogs to make sure they are kind before approaching them. And so I agree it does get frustrating when every one assumes that he is a dog who is wagging his tail watching so he must want you to run up and pet him.

Trucker also encounters the problem that he is a "rarity" up North in the US, as a Redbone, so people are obsessed with him. This provides me no end of frustration, like I believe my dog is beautiful but I also think that I see dogs that are just as beautiful walk by. For some reason people always approach MY DOG and never the gorgeous German Shepard or Akita or Black Lab walking by (I know it is because of his coloring because they always mention it and want to know what kind of dog he is but you don't have to run up and get in his face, stare in his eyes, or reach down and pet him). I am tempted to get him a shirt that says I am a Redbone Coonhoud, nuff said.
 

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A rescue here tried promoting it, but it kinda fell by the wayside. We had all 3 colours here. Green for friendly and approachable, Yellow for caution-needs space, and red for danger/stop- don't approach. Tessa is a yellow working on her green lol
 

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@TruckersMom - have you seen any of the jackets/harnesses with patches that say things like "I need space" or "In Training - Do Not Pet"?

They might be a little more clear cut, and the latter may deter people without making them think your dog is dangerous.

However, there will always be stupid people who don't know dogs. Worse yet, are the stupid people who think they know dogs and proceed to do things "from experience" that are downright wrong, potentially dangerous, and just ridiculously annoying.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
@TruckersMom - have you seen any of the jackets/harnesses with patches that say things like "I need space" or "In Training - Do Not Pet"?

They might be a little more clear cut, and the latter may deter people without making them think your dog is dangerous.

However, there will always be stupid people who don't know dogs. Worse yet, are the stupid people who think they know dogs and proceed to do things "from experience" that are downright wrong, potentially dangerous, and just ridiculously annoying.
I have seen them. Trucker is an escape artist from harnesses so righ now he has a TrueLove Harness now because we had some very scary experiences with other harness.


I have been looking at these ones:



And replacing the patches with ones that says "Rescue Rehabilitation" but any harness that doesn't have a center chest strap is a no go. And I hate to spent the money on any one of these for them not to work out since they are no cheap.

Amazon.com : Dogline Unimax Multi-Purpose Vest Harness for Dogs and 2 Removable NOSE WORK Patches (Blue, X Large (36"-46)) : Pet Supplies

: Amazon.com: OneTigris Tactical Dog Training Vest Molle Compact Vest Harness (Mandrake, Large)
 

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I certainly wasn't suggesting that your only two options are to "lock your dog up" or "let strangers run up to him" at will.

If gear is what you want, instead of looking for harnesses/leashes/patches/etc., all of which direct human attention at your dog (a big trigger for some, though not all, dogs), maybe look for a t-shirt you can wear. Then the attention stays on you, and you get more control over the resulting interaction. Grisha Stewart was selling some for awhile, and I think the design is still available for sale via her website: Step Back – New t-shirts for dogs and people | Empowered Animals

And I agree with mathilda that the only piece of dog equipment which will reliably help strangers keep their distance is a muzzle. I love muzzles, for this and other reasons (provided dogs learn to love them too)...the baskerville ultra is pretty excellent for comfort, and is sized so that most dogs can pant comfortably while wearing it.
 

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I certainly wasn't suggesting that your only two options are to "lock your dog up" or "let strangers run up to him" at will.

If gear is what you want, instead of looking for harnesses/leashes/patches/etc., all of which direct human attention at your dog (a big trigger for some, though not all, dogs), maybe look for a t-shirt you can wear. Then the attention stays on you, and you get more control over the resulting interaction. Grisha Stewart was selling some for awhile, and I think the design is still available for sale via her website: Step Back – New t-shirts for dogs and people | Empowered Animals

And I agree with mathilda that the only piece of dog equipment which will reliably help strangers keep their distance is a muzzle. I love muzzles, for this and other reasons (provided dogs learn to love them too)...the baskerville ultra is pretty excellent for comfort, and is sized so that most dogs can pant comfortably while wearing it.
Sorry if my response came off rude, a lot of the time I am just grasping at straws to make people understand what they can and can't do to Trucker. He wants to be everyone's friend, he just needs space and time to get there and not everyone ("Joe Q Public") gets that.

I really don't know what I want. Other than to be able to take him out and have people maintain a respectable distance, asking before approaching, etc.

I have thought about a muzzle but then at the same time I feel like I am punishing my genuinely lovely dog for other misbehavior and wasn't getting the crap beat out of him his first 2 years of life punishment enough (I am sure this a human emotion and not a dog one but it still concerns me). Also when he gets nervous he licks his nose and yawns a lot. I wouldn't want to interfere with his non-aggressive fear reactions.
 
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