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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's almost time for the new puppy, I think I might wanna a submissive pup I hear their easier to control & train. My current dog is in the middle not too submissive but not too pushy either, my father thinks it's ok as long as it still makes a good guard dog.

Any Advice?
 

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I wouldn't say an extremely submissive dog is necessarily easier to train ...they tend to get scared and shut down when at all confused. Plus there's no way to tell how submissive a dog will end up being when it's a puppy. My dog was incredibly submissive as a young dog and now she is generally in the middle, submissive w some dogs, not so much w many others.
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I think if I were going to be getting a puppy I would be going for a confident member of the litter, being submissive doesn't necessarily make them easier to train they are just a lot more sensitive to things like tone of voice etc.

A submissive pup may also be a lot more likely to be easily scared of the world, traffic other dogs, strangers, children etc issues that make having a pup a lot more hard work.
 
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I will say that when I picked out my puppy I picked out the smallest, runt-ish, most frightened puppy of the litter. While all her much larger sisters were super excited by everyone and everything, trying to jump up out of the back of the seat (the puppies were being given away out of a truck in a Walmart parking lot), my Nika was hiding under the seat curled up in a little ball. She just called my name.
She was very submissive as a puppy/young dog, but turned into a quite confident, truly remarkably adaptable, very well adjusted animal, who is not particularly submissive in most situations. She was extremely easy to train. You really can't tell how they'll turn out based on what they're like at 8 weeks old.
That said I wouldn't recommend choosing a puppy specifically for submissiveness. It's not all that desirable a trait. A confident dog is better.
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We got the big pushy bossy pup in the litter, and there were good things and bad things about it, she was very confident and settled in very quickly, at times over confident, so we definitely had to take a firm hand with her, but the confidence really made it easy to expose her to new things.

Now she is still confident, but not at all pushy or "dominant" Occasionally stubborn, but nothing that a nice piece of tripe won't solve. I would personally go with the bossy pushy puppy again, as it is so nice having a dog who is not scared and accepts new experiences very easily. As long as you are firm and consistent, that dominant puppy can grow to be a great dog.
 

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Your best bet is to get a puppy that is somewhere in the middle, not to submissive, but not to pushy. Submissive can equal a puppy that has a timid temperament, one that is going through a fearful phase, or one who is simply content to let others take the lead. Unless you really want a project dog you don't want one with a timid temperament.

What do you mean by guard dog?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Your best bet is to get a puppy that is somewhere in the middle, not to submissive, but not to pushy. Submissive can equal a puppy that has a timid temperament, one that is going through a fearful phase, or one who is simply content to let others take the lead. Unless you really want a project dog you don't want one with a timid temperament.

What do you mean by guard dog?
Like basically let us know if someone's at our home, the lab is kind of on the friendly passive side and that's why me and my father both agreed on a rottie or gsd.
 

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Levi was somewhere in the middle energy-wise, and has turned out to be a marvellous dog. Confident enough to check out new situations, but laid back enough to deal with pushy or rude dogs.

I think you mean more like a watch dog? A dog let will let both you know someone is there, and let the other person know a dog lives in the house?
 

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Like basically let us know if someone's at our home, the lab is kind of on the friendly passive side and that's why me and my father both agreed on a rottie or gsd.

You've got a pretty good plan then, but with both of those breeds you really want a dog with a good, stable, temperament. Due to backyard breeders and puppy mills I've seen to many that are fear aggressive, they'll alert you to someone outside the house, but they're liable to be less then a joy to take anywhere.

I'd go with a puppy that is friendly and confident. GSD's are the easier to train. I'd teach him to bark on cue and use a hand signal, then if someone approaches on a walk you can cue him to bark.
 
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