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Hey !

I have been considering getting a dog for quite long now and it seems to be a right time to get one this year. Apparently, I can't simply figure out what dog breed would suit me the best. Every time I find a cute looking dog that I fell in love with and check out the stats for her, the stats ALWAYS say that the dog is really really exercise needy and has extremely high tendency to bark. I don't really want to play and run with the dog 24 hours a day or listen to barking at 3 AM because some car drives by my house.

I'm completely fine with barking if it's not all day long unnecessary ear hurting barking. Also a little bit of playing and 1 to 1 and a half hour walks every day would be ideal. Somehow I can't find a dog like this which looks I like and are very kind. Golden retriever is too big and sporty. Welsh corgi was the dog I wanted for a while, then I read somebody writing about him and saying that it barks a lot, needs HUGE amounts of exercise every day and doesn't fit first time dog owners at all. It was a huge bummer for me. Guess there is no cute small to medium sized dog that is kind and has realistic exercise needs and controllable barking. I have done few tests and they suggest me Chihuahuas and Tibetan Spaniels which I most definitely do not like. Help would be appreciated.
 

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Any dog is going to be a terrible fit if you don't get some professional training. I honestly would look into great trainers using effective and positive training. Ask for references from clients and read reviews. Make sure they have group and private training. Ideally a couple dog sports as well or a doggie gym and classes for that. Then, once you find that amazing trainer, get he Corgi or any other dog you like best! You always bond best with the dog you chose yourself then the dog others tell you wouldn't suit you. Training makes all the difference, and so does getting out and doing fun dog sports and activities your trainer can help you select the right one for you and your dog. Good luck!
 

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Have you thought about going to a shelter and telling them what your looking for in a dog?
Maybe look into lower energy breeds, since this is your first dog and your not really looking for a dog who needs a lot of exercise, I would stay away from the herding group. They have a lot of energy and need lots of exercise and mental stimulation.

What exactly are you looking for in a dog, how much time are you going to be able to spend with it and exercise and train it? Do you have a preference about how much grooming maintenance your dog will require?
 

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Have you thought about going to a shelter and telling them what your looking for in a dog?
Maybe look into lower energy breeds, since this is your first dog and your not really looking for a dog who needs a lot of exercise, I would stay away from the herding group. They have a lot of energy and need lots of exercise and mental stimulation.

What exactly are you looking for in a dog, how much time are you going to be able to spend with it and exercise and train it? Do you have a preference about how much grooming maintenance your dog will require?
I am basically looking for a companion dog. Medium size most preferably and I would be able to walk him everyday for about 30-45 minutes 2 times a day. It really depends on the day but in addition to the walking I would play with him for a while too. I don't really mind the grooming, once a week would be fine for me but I am not the biggest fan of long coated dogs or white coated dogs. I have quite big yard where he could play but it's not fenced.

I am not really sure what group would fit me because I don't want a lazy dog neither a sporty dog. Here are the features I would like to have in my dog:
- Moderate exercise needs
- Easy to train
- Playful
- Stranger friendly
- Fairly short coat
- Not super high tendency to bark
- Medium size
- Corgi alike face

If you could suggest me breeds, it would be great. We do not really have shelters around here neither big kennels so I am not able to go look at the dogs if I do not have the right breed in mind already.

Thanks
 

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Honestly, I think people over-do it on the exercise stuff in those breed descriptions. I know very few people who walk their dog for more than an hour a day. But when they do is provide mental stimulation in the form of training and classes, and actively engaging the dog. Lots of these higher energy breeds don't need to just walk and walk and walk, but they do need to be kept busy and you can't expect them to entertain themselves forever, if that makes sense. And a lot of this mellows by the time they are 2-3. If you can really walk a dog consistently for 1-1.5 hours per day, then most breeds would be a fine fit for that. Maybe not a border collie or malinois, but a corgi certainly, or a golden retriever or a spaniel.

Personally, I think a corgi might be a fine fit for you. My MIL owns one and she's certainly never walked the dog for hours a day or done a ton of training. They can be barky, but I would meet some and see if it's a level you can live with.
 
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I also think you need to take the recommendations with a grain of salt. With that said, I would avoid the serious working/herding breeds (Border Collies, Malinois etc).

If you think you like a certain breed, find some local breeders and chat with them. They'll give you good, reliable information about the traits they are focused on in their particular breeding program.
 
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Honestly, I think people over-do it on the exercise stuff in those breed descriptions. I know very few people who walk their dog for more than an hour a day. But when they do is provide mental stimulation in the form of training and classes, and actively engaging the dog. Lots of these higher energy breeds don't need to just walk and walk and walk, but they do need to be kept busy and you can't expect them to entertain themselves forever, if that makes sense. And a lot of this mellows by the time they are 2-3. If you can really walk a dog consistently for 1-1.5 hours per day, then most breeds would be a fine fit for that. Maybe not a border collie or malinois, but a corgi certainly, or a golden retriever or a spaniel.

Personally, I think a corgi might be a fine fit for you. My MIL owns one and she's certainly never walked the dog for hours a day or done a ton of training. They can be barky, but I would meet some and see if it's a level you can live with.
Hmm, I've heard that it is a gamble if the puppy is really barky or doesn't bark at all. Altough, I live in quite bad place for getting a corgi because the nearest corgi kennel is like 100 miles away and right now they do not have any pembroke puppies available. My next door neighbor has a pomeranian and he was really barky as young but now when he is about 8 years old I rarely hear him bark. Could the barking go away when a corgi gets older or is it easy to teach him to be quiet as a puppy ?
 

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^Ditto Elrohwen!

Herding breeds in general vary a ton between breeds, purpose (conformation, sports, working) within a single breed, and even between breeders actually breeding for the same purpose!

Going the rescue/shelter route is a good idea as staff can help match you!

But if you like corgis, I wouldn't discount them at this point. Look at conformation and obedience lines/breeders. While I do not know a ton of corgis, I do know several from conformation lines (also do obedience and rally obedience). These guys are honestly more medium energy. Their owners work the typical 8-4work week. Keep in mind that these dogs are worked with regularly. They attend a weekly class and are likely trained a bit almost daily. One goes to day care regularly. Another goes hiking and camping often on weekends. All likely get daily walks and play. These guys, from what I've seen and know about them would likely be just fine in many homes, even first time owners. As long as the owners work with and do something with the dog regularly. ;)

And even with higher energy dogs, I think people can create an issue with too much exercise. That exercise just builds endurance so the dog can go even longer! If mental stimulation is overlooked often the owner just ends up with an adreneline junky! The mental stuff ime is often far more useful in draining energy than hours of walks, fetch, etc.

I have a couple of high energy (as in can literally go all day) terrier mixes. They are both young too (one is maybe 3 years and the other is an approx. 10 month old puppy). I do take them on walks, but not everyday. Instead they get meals out of frozen kongs or food dispensing toys. We train in short sessions several times each day. They go to a group class at least once a week as well as hang out on crates and sometimes demo in the classes I teach. Often go geocaching with me on weekends. The walks they do get tend to be on non class days and include bits of training here and there along the way with lots of exploration. So they might do a bit of heelwork and then get to sniff and explore. Then a recall game. Then more exploring. On a typical workday walk I take each maybe a mile and that's it.They haven't had a walk yet today, just some play/training in the yard and breakfasts from toys. Yet they are both relaxing atm. One is napping and the other chewing on a cow horn. I used to focus much more on the physical activity side but my dogs always seemed to be anxious and wanting to go. I've learned to swap between activity and relaxation (they can nap, chew toys, pretty much anything to quietly entertain themselves) throughout the day. And really spend time on the mental stuff.
 

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Hmm, I've heard that it is a gamble if the puppy is really barky or doesn't bark at all. Altough, I live in quite bad place for getting a corgi because the nearest corgi kennel is like 100 miles away and right now they do not have any pembroke puppies available. My next door neighbor has a pomeranian and he was really barky as young but now when he is about 8 years old I rarely hear him bark. Could the barking go away when a corgi gets older or is it easy to teach him to be quiet as a puppy ?
Certainly all dogs are individuals. Some are naturally more vocal than others. Maturity could I suppose be a factor but IDK... often a vocal dog will be vocal throughout it's life. However IME a large part of how much barking a dog does comes down to how well the owner manages their dog and the training put in!
 

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Hmm, I've heard that it is a gamble if the puppy is really barky or doesn't bark at all. Altough, I live in quite bad place for getting a corgi because the nearest corgi kennel is like 100 miles away and right now they do not have any pembroke puppies available. My next door neighbor has a pomeranian and he was really barky as young but now when he is about 8 years old I rarely hear him bark. Could the barking go away when a corgi gets older or is it easy to teach him to be quiet as a puppy ?
Certainly all dogs are individuals. Some are naturally more vocal than others. Maturity could I suppose be a factor but IDK... often a vocal dog will be vocal throughout it's life. However IME a large part of how much barking a dog does comes down to how well the owner manages their dog and the training put in!
Maybe I am just worried too much because I have never had a dog. Could you suggest me good breeds for first time owners, I don't want to give the dog away if I can't handle it...
 

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I think the BEST dog for a first time owner would be a young adult dog that has lived in a home environment with people who know dogs fairly well. That way you can get past the puppy stage, have a better idea of the dog's temperament, and can really know what you're getting into because the current owner can tell you exactly what that dog is like and if it will fit into your situation.

That may be easier said than done, but it's not impossible. I'd start with the Corgi Club of America and start talking to breeders. You may be able to find someone who has a young adult that they were planning to show and it didn't work out, or they may know of one in rescue. Breeders tend to network :)

It may be that the dog is a good distance away, but transport of some kind is almost always an option.

Otherwise, you can poke around on Petfinder or Adoptapet and look for a young adult that appeals to you and seems to have some of the criteria you are looking for. Again, a dog being fostered would be best because they'll know more about the individual dog and what it is like in a home environment. And sometimes, just getting the word out and asking people who are in possession of these dogs can give you new ideas - again with the networking.

Puppies are a lot of fun, but they require a lot of time and training and there's really no telling how their temperament will turn out. Buying from a good breeder may help, but I've known people who have gotten dogs from "top" kennels that have turned out to be fearful/fear aggressive. It's a little easier to tell when they're older.
 

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Sometimes when people talk about 'what's the best dog for me? Breed X, Y, or Z' it sounds like they think they are buying boxes of cereal, like all they need to do is determine if the best fit for them is Cheerios, Corn Flakes, or Froot Loops, and once they know that, just pop over to the grocery store and buy a box of Corn Flakes because one is the same as all the rest.

Not so with dogs. You can'd compare 'Collie vs Labrador vs Doberman' decide one is best for you and then just go find any old breeder of that particular breed and get one of their dogs. There is tremendous variation within a breed, especially if you are looking at BEHAVIORS. You really have to understand what the breeder is breeding FOR and if that matches your desire. Let's say you are trying to compare the Golden Retriever vs the Labrador Retriever. If you are a hunter and after looking at all the facts you believe the lab is going to be your best bet, but you go buy a lab from someone who is breeding labs as companion animals only, you are going to be disappointed. If the only breeder in your area of actual hunting/retrieving dogs happens to be breeding Goldens, even though it wasn't first on your list, it is going to be a much better fit than a lab bred just be a companions. Similarly, a person debating between Lab and Golden to be a family companion, is really debating the wrong thing especially if all the local Lab breeders are breeding hunting dogs and all the local Golden breeders are breeding companion animals first with no regard to how interested their dogs are in swimming out and bringing back ducks.

So for all of these, what's much more important isn't what breed it is, but to tell the breeder what characteristics you are looking for and if they are producing dogs like that. Because while there is huge variation within a breed, dogs are generally very very very similar to their parents and grandparents.

You will see me make this basic post a lot if you continue to hang around here. In your specific case, for a Corgi, it's not about finding the closest Corgi breeder, or the breeder who is offering dogs at the cheapest price, or the Corgi breeder who has a dog available RIGHT NOW, it's about finding the breeder who is creating the Corgi closest to what you need, which means a lower energy family companion type that doesn't bark a lot
 

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Sometimes when people talk about 'what's the best dog for me? Breed X, Y, or Z' it sounds like they think they are buying boxes of cereal, like all they need to do is determine if the best fit for them is Cheerios, Corn Flakes, or Froot Loops, and once they know that, just pop over to the grocery store and buy a box of Corn Flakes because one is the same as all the rest.

Not so with dogs. You can'd compare 'Collie vs Labrador vs Doberman' decide one is best for you and then just go find any old breeder of that particular breed and get one of their dogs. There is tremendous variation within a breed, especially if you are looking at BEHAVIORS. You really have to understand what the breeder is breeding FOR and if that matches your desire. Let's say you are trying to compare the Golden Retriever vs the Labrador Retriever. If you are a hunter and after looking at all the facts you believe the lab is going to be your best bet, but you go buy a lab from someone who is breeding labs as companion animals only, you are going to be disappointed. If the only breeder in your area of actual hunting/retrieving dogs happens to be breeding Goldens, even though it wasn't first on your list, it is going to be a much better fit than a lab bred just be a companions. Similarly, a person debating between Lab and Golden to be a family companion, is really debating the wrong thing especially if all the local Lab breeders are breeding hunting dogs and all the local Golden breeders are breeding companion animals first with no regard to how interested their dogs are in swimming out and bringing back ducks.

So for all of these, what's much more important isn't what breed it is, but to tell the breeder what characteristics you are looking for and if they are producing dogs like that. Because while there is huge variation within a breed, dogs are generally very very very similar to their parents and grandparents.

You will see me make this basic post a lot if you continue to hang around here. In your specific case, for a Corgi, it's not about finding the closest Corgi breeder, or the breeder who is offering dogs at the cheapest price, or the Corgi breeder who has a dog available RIGHT NOW, it's about finding the breeder who is creating the Corgi closest to what you need, which means a lower energy family companion type that doesn't bark a lot
You're right, I should give them a call and ask about the dogs that they breed.
 

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I am basically looking for a companion dog. Medium size most preferably and I would be able to walk him everyday for about 30-45 minutes 2 times a day. It really depends on the day but in addition to the walking I would play with him for a while too.
What you are describing sounds like sufficient exercise for a low or medium energy dog. What you may not be aware of is what dogs really need, which is both physical and mental stimulation. Taking a dog for a walk is both exercise but also soothing to his brain. Think of it like doggie Tai-Chi. So it's good to have a walk program, but realize you will also need to give your dog additional exercise by once a week or so really letting him tear it up be it through going to an open space with a friends dog and letting them play, playing fetch, go for a swim in a lake, go for a bikeride with an attachment for the dog's leash and give him a good run, etc.

Additionally, stimulation to the dog's mind is needed. Continual training of the dog is a great way to give him mental stimulation. So are puzzles with treats hidden inside, or games where he has to sniff things out with his nose.

I don't really mind the grooming, once a week would be fine for me but I am not the biggest fan of long coated dogs or white coated dogs.
It all depends on what you mean by grooming. Many dogs are fine with a simple occasional brushing. Some dogs like poodles and terriers that appear to need a ton of grooming can actually be clipped easily at home, as long a you don't care about creating a fancy show coat. This done monthly would be plenty. There are plenty of youtube breed specific videos on how to clip a dog's coat. Note that for many dogs that don't require you trim them will shed heavily when winter comes and when winter goes.

In other words all dog coats will affect your life, just in different ways. Why do you say no to white dogs? I am guessing because if you are like most people and wear a lot of medium to dark colored clothing white fur really shows up easily. Is this the case with you?

I have quite big yard where he could play but it's not fenced.
#1 fence it, both to keep your dog in and keep wandering dogs and other animals out.

#2 a fenced yard is great for having a close space where you and your dog can go play or go train, but some people think they can put a dog in the yard and it will take care of exercising itself. It will not, especially if it's in the yard for hours at a time, and days upon days. Then it's just boring.

I am not really sure what group would fit me because I don't want a lazy dog neither a sporty dog. Here are the features I would like to have in my dog:
What do you have against lazy dogs!?!?! Just kidding...kind of. What do YOU mean by lazy dog?

Some hunting dogs when given proper exercise outside, inside the house are very lazy, content to just lay at your feet or in their favorite spot. Compare to a dog with overall less energy but who runs at a constant level and is going going going be they inside or outside. Third comparison would be to the giant breeds, who don't need a ton of exercise and seem to be content to be relaxing all day, fourth comparison would be to dogs like the greyhound which seem to maintain a mentality that to always be able to run at top speed at an instant's notice they must keep their batteries charged 100% all the time, and do this by constantly napping and just being generally lazy...until it becomes time to run or just frolic in the yard and then ZOOM.



- Moderate exercise needs
covered above

- Easy to train
The 'smart' breeds, generally those in the herding group are going to be easiest to train. The thing about smart dogs is they train easy, including accidental training such as "in the dog park, my owner goes and gets the leash and a bottle of water out of the car just before calling me over to go home, I want to play more, so when I see owner coming with the leash and bottle of water, I am going to run for the far end of the park"

Otherwise, how easy it is to train a dog is more about the human using good training methods, being consistent, and being realistic about expectations (it's a dog, it doesn't speak any human language even if it has learned a few words, it's a dog it just doesn't have the brain power to pick up new training immediately, and may need a second or three to process the commands given. It's a dog, you may have been able to study for hours on end, your dog can't)

Finally this varies a lot within a breed. See the below video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D_IJCzJVVBs

One dog just gets the sit command right away. Now, the 'trainer' isn't a very effective trainer. He talks to the dogs like they understand english, vs 'showing the dog' by saying sit and pushing his butt down then rewarding and repeating once it is clear that the 'dumber' dog can't figure out what is wrong. Also, he says the name of the dog followed by command, but is inconsistent, I can see the smarter dog is thinking 'you keep on saying sit sit sit, I am sitting!' this also adds additional confusion and distraction to the 'dumb' dog.

- Playful
All dogs are playful, you just have to tailor to what they like. Some dogs you throw a ball for them to fetch they are going to look at you and that's it, others will go bonkers for balls. Some will love to dig, to follow scent trails, splash through water, etc.

- Stranger friendly
Except for a few exotic flock guardian types, stranger friendly is all about proper socialization as a pup, and if that doesn't happen, training the dog to be in the right mental state when a stranger comes by.

- Not super high tendency to bark
Hounds and Spitz types have a higher tendency to bark, however I believe barking is something that should be addressed through training not breed selection. Plenty of dogs of breeds not known to be big barkers will bark their heads off if they are bored, stressed, because it gets a reaction from the owner, because they aren't getting enough exercise, etc etc.

I believe the problem generally is in excessive barking, not barking. Someone coming up to the door and the dog barks and you give him the 'quiet boy, I'll go see who it is' command and the dog stops barking = all good. Dog barks and barks and barks as you open the door, talk to the stranger, and a stranger walks away = bad.


- Corgi alike face
What do you mean by this? medium to long muzzle as opposed to a smushed in face like a bulldog has? Erect ears as opposed to droopy ears like a hound has?
 

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I don't think a Corgi would be a bad fit for you. Those exercise recommendations are a bit overblown I think, an hour to an hour and a half of total walking time plus play time should be fine for a Corgi. They may bark some, but a lot of that depends on the individual dog too. It may just be when someone comes to the door, etc, like many dogs do.
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I don't think a Corgi would be a bad fit for you. Those exercise recommendations are a bit overblown I think, an hour to an hour and a half of total walking time plus play time should be fine for a Corgi. They may bark some, but a lot of that depends on the individual dog too. It may just be when someone comes to the door, etc, like many dogs do.
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Well, I just met a Corgi owner and I started talking to her. She said that they bark a lot, but do not need so much exercise. I even got few extremely loud barks when I approached the owner. She also told about the mental stimulation that they need but it can be easily given to them by buying them toys that require a bit of brain to use, such as iFetch or so. Overall it's really cute looking dog that is extremely loud or not at all. Maybe I should consider buying a quiet adult dog or find a good puppy. Puppies are so cute tho, I am not sure if I can buy a dog without experiencing the cuteness overload stage.
 
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