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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am curious who here is waiting for a puppy to enter their lives.

I am about to pay a deposit for a female Cauasian Ovcharka but the earliest the breeding will take place is June 2016 and the puppy would be ready in October. If that breeding doesn't take place, then it will be December 2016 and a puppy in early spring 2017. So a long wait. But the breeder is just the kind of breeder I want to get a puppy from, naturally reared to raw, health tested etc.

In the meantime, I am learning as much as I can about the breed and how I train her to be the very best she can be, given this is a LGD and potentially aggressive.
 

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In the meantime, I am learning as much as I can about the breed and how I train her to be the very best she can be, given this is a LGD and potentially aggressive.
Um, I think "potential" is too gentle a word for it. Ovcharkas are beasts of a dog that, even when well socialized and trained will likely be a danger to people and other animals they are unfamiliar with. Due to their size they are also potentially lethal, and difficult to control. I'm not saying this in a judgmental way, but I personally believe there is no reason for someone without livestock to guard to own them. There's another member on here who is going to get a pup of one (hannahs), and there's a member somewhere (I forget her name) who has them. Some other members might know her username so maybe others will comment. In the meantime I'm very interested in why you'd like an animal like this. I see you have a Mastiff but Mastiffs are usually known for a sweet disposition. Ovcharkas are known for being...well, ferocious. They are a SERIOUS dog, and I have to admit they are one of the few breeds no one could even pay me to own. But yes, I would most definitely suggest you do some more research with some owners on what owning an animal like this is.
 

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Thats a potentially long wait you got there! I would die a little bit waiting that long. Yet good for you for finding a great breeder and be willing to wait for the pups.

I found Aayla's breeder right before she was born. So I had about a 2 month wait, though I knew I was going to get an Aussie puppy at some point for about 4-5 months before that.
 
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I am curious who here is waiting for a puppy to enter their lives.

I am about to pay a deposit for a female Cauasian Ovcharka but the earliest the breeding will take place is June 2016 and the puppy would be ready in October. If that breeding doesn't take place, then it will be December 2016 and a puppy in early spring 2017. So a long wait. But the breeder is just the kind of breeder I want to get a puppy from, naturally reared to raw, health tested etc.

In the meantime, I am learning as much as I can about the breed and how I train her to be the very best she can be, given this is a LGD and potentially aggressive.
Wow how exciting!
I have to agree with the other poster though, as I’m sure you know already, these are not really a “pet” breed of dog. I’m guessing you’re looking for a dog who will actually be working as a LGD?
 

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I guess the best way of describing living with a LGD would be that you will need to make sure you develop a working relationship with your CO. They are a breed that is not known to be as biddable as lets lay a Lab or BC. I find with LGD's, working with the dog instead of just telling them to do something works best. For example, with my Lab mix, he is quite biddable but with my Kuvasz I need to approach differently to get her to do something, even as simple as the sit command. For her it is more of a "thank you for doing this for me" or "you're doing your job very well" instead of a "here's a treat for doing what I asked". Not sure if that makes any sense, it's hard to describe without you being here to see. Same with alert barking. If I tell her to shut up she won't listen; if I go and acknowledge what she's trying to tell me and tell her "thank you for doing your job" and a quick pat on the and she settles pretty quickly afterwards (for the most part).
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I guess the best way of describing living with a LGD would be that you will need to make sure you develop a working relationship with your CO. They are a breed that is not known to be as biddable as lets lay a Lab or BC. I find with LGD's, working with the dog instead of just telling them to do something works best. For example, with my Lab mix, he is quite biddable but with my Kuvasz I need to approach differently to get her to do something, even as simple as the sit command. For her it is more of a "thank you for doing this for me" or "you're doing your job very well" instead of a "here's a treat for doing what I asked". Not sure if that makes any sense, it's hard to describe without you being here to see. Same with alert barking. If I tell her to shut up she won't listen; if I go and acknowledge what she's trying to tell me and tell her "thank you for doing your job" and a quick pat on the and she settles pretty quickly afterwards (for the most part).

@timber exactly!!!

I love the *Heart* the LGD breeds have, it matches their size.

You couldn't pay me to have a Border Collie.
 

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Another thing I just thought of is never forgetting what your dog is no matter how sweet they are in controlled environments. I find sometimes people (not talking about anyone here in specific) forget what they're dogs are bred for and let their guard down a little too much after a while. My motto is to never underestimate a dog (no matter the breed, size, temperament, etc, of a dog). I'm not implying to be on high alert 100% of the time either because that is just not realistic and your quality of life will surely decline, but just don't forget how powerful they can be if they want to. My Anatolian mix (?) is a very stable dog, has a great temperament, is very calculating, is very loving, independent yet loyal...but...you do not let other dogs have the opportunity to mess with him because he will finish it. It is in their nature to not back down from confrontations. Timber is not the type of dog to start anything, but will not back down if he finds himself in a situation with another dog with ill intentions. My vet even mentioned how much larger Timber's teeth are than the average dog he sees on a regular basis, something to be conscious about.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
What I think is important for owners of LGDs (any dog) is that they teach the dog to give their energy to them. This is the basis for trust. A dog must be "in trust" with their owner.

I love this quote from Kevin Behan because it is, IMO, the key to living in harmony with a dog:

True sociability arises from a passion-in-common, and the typical dog owner doesn’t understand canine passion. Dogs are group hunters. By working together as a team, each member of the group learns to be obedient to the ways of the prey. So when dog and owner agree on what is the prey, (and dogs are infinitely malleable as to what constitutes “the prey”) they are able to live in absolute harmony.
 

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I've been on a waiting list since March! I guess that's only nine months now, but it feels like forever, since we decided in January or so of last year that we wanted a dog. I'm not sure where on the list I am, but I'm really hoping to get one this spring/summer.

The wait has been so difficult, but it's also been awesome for doing research and learning a lot.
 
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Um, I think "potential" is too gentle a word for it. Ovcharkas are beasts of a dog that, even when well socialized and trained will likely be a danger to people and other animals they are unfamiliar with. Due to their size they are also potentially lethal, and difficult to control. I'm not saying this in a judgmental way, but I personally believe there is no reason for someone without livestock to guard to own them. There's another member on here who is going to get a pup of one (hannahs), and there's a member somewhere (I forget her name) who has them. Some other members might know her username so maybe others will comment. In the meantime I'm very interested in why you'd like an animal like this. I see you have a Mastiff but Mastiffs are usually known for a sweet disposition. Ovcharkas are known for being...well, ferocious. They are a SERIOUS dog, and I have to admit they are one of the few breeds no one could even pay me to own. But yes, I would most definitely suggest you do some more research with some owners on what owning an animal like this is.
I have heard about Ocharkas and am aware they can be difficult and temperamental but I didn't know to what extent. I learned some valuable information from your post - thank you!

:)
 

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A well bred CO can be a great addition to the right home. That is the key right there; "the right home" as they are an intense breed, but not an alien breed either. Yes they are serious and can be lethal, but any LGD can be and this must be considered before getting one. I am not sure what the OP's lifestyle is, but is good they are doing research and trying to gather as much info as possible beforehand.
 

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We are on a waiting list for a Cockapoo puppy. We are hoping for late Spring or Early Summer 2016, but of course Mother Nature will determine when the momma dogs go into heat ;) I have been using this time to do research as this will be our first puppy. I have already learned so much!
 

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Can I just end this before it gets worse? I expressed my opinion and it seems everyone else got a lot more invested in it than I did.
 
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I think at the end of the day, the OP can and will do as she likes; I hope it works out.

My parents have considered getting an LGD to use as a working dog at some point. They haven't settled on a breed yet. They have a lot of dog experience but not too much LGD experience so they're looking for one that is less intense. One of my dad's best friends has a Fila (I think) and loves her; he has much more LGD experience so is trying to help them find the right dog.

Personally, I intend for my next dog to be a Collie from a breeder....I guess you could say I'm waiting for a puppy, but it will be awhile. ;)
 
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