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I have a 1 year old Catahoula/Australian Cattle Dog mix and she is practically perfect. I rescued her at 6 weeks old, had her spayed at 4 months, and together we did puppy obedience school and continue to practice our skills every day. For our first 6 months together, she came with me to work and on most trips - we spent very little time apart. I now have a job that keeps me away close to 12 hours of the day. However, I have a wonderful friend with a fenced in backyard and a retriever/lab mix (3 year old female) who has become my girl's best friend. They play together all day, running and digging and chasing chipmunks, and she is always exhausted when I pick her up at the end of each day.

Lately, she has shown signs of territorial aggression towards any strangers that approach my friend's fence. My friend's dog is the friendliest and most easygoing canine around, and all the neighbors enjoy stopping by to say hi and give treats whether my friend is home or not. My dog has made that difficult though, as she starts charging the fence, barking aggressively, and even biting my friend's dog and pushing her away from anyone trying to give her attention.

When I or my friend are around, she behaves well. When on a leash, in a dog park, on a walk, at anyone else's home, or in any other unfamiliar situation, she looks to me and listens to my commands. But when left alone in the fence, she becomes territorial, protective of both the space and my friend's dog, and aggressive to all who try to approach.

Has anyone had any similar experiences with their dog? Any suggestions on how to retrain this behavior?
 

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Hi!
Our family has two catahoula leopard dogs, one is 4 and the other 2.5 years. They also are inseparable, sleep, eat, play and have anxiety (at least one of them does, the caretaker dog I call her - Chloe. Addison is mentally challenged, developmentally stunted due to starvation, so Chloe is her guardian.
Resource guarding and protecting family - which includes another dog - is typical in the houlas. Also herding/nipping at doggy legs and playing pretty rough, like they are taking "down" a hog, which is what they were bred to do. They live with my daughter/son in law now in a fenced in back yard. Chloe will NOT LET ANYONE NEAR Addison unless we say it is ok, and even then she is very anxious and protective. We have worked on her playing too rough with Addison in the backyard by giving her time outs, bringing her in the house for a few minutes...this has worked very well. You will need to monitor their play time as the more familiar they are with each other the more the prey drive kicks in.

Regarding the dog next door, Chloe's job is to "protect" her territory at all costs, unless we approve....she has been trained to "settle" when we approve the intruder. However, she has much difficulty with settling when it comes to Addison. If you spend time training your houla, bringing her in the house when the dog next door comes out, letting her know it is not acceptable behavior, this may help. BAT and LAT are methods to training for her. I will say that if this dog comes into the back yard or through your fence....it could be a dog fight. And your dog will probably win. Our Chloe now "visits" with other dogs via two fences.
PM for more information. Hope others will provide input on training for you!
 

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Sorry I couldn't post more...but to keep some humor...go to Hyperbole and a Half and read the dog scripts....hilarious! The one about moving is just so typical of a houla!

Oh, our houlas don't "live" in the yard, they just play there!
 

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Sounds to me like barrier aggression and perhaps some redirected aggression.
Occurs in dogs of all breeds and sizes, not just catahoulas.;)

This is a good place to start!
http://www.dogforum.com/dog-behavior/reactivity-leash-aggression-barrier-frustration-12538/

As you read you'll likely notice that practically all the training methods involve the handler (that would be either you or your friend) being right there to reward the dog. If unable to be outside, then your friend should keep your dog inside. This is something that has to be managed and prevented because allowing a dog to continue to practice this behavior really only reinforces it. Not to mention that there is potential for a bite and even a dog fight to occur when people greet without your or your friend there. Better safe than sorry!:)
 
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