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Teeth brushing issue... Help?

361 Views 19 Replies 10 Participants Last post by  emeraldecho
Hello everyone. I have a big problem with needing and wanting to groom my dogs teeth. I had bought doggy toothpaste and a small EXTRA soft (and they are) bristle tooth brushes for my girl Foxy. We got foxy when she was 7. She was not very friendly when we got her. She was scared and confused. She would growl loudly at anyone that tried to pet her, sit within 4 feet of her, and if anyone were to put her and our one dog Sammy near eachother, she would attack him. She wouldnt hurt him, but mainley bully and scare him.

7 years later, i am proud to say she loves car rides, hugs, cuddles, all other dogs that are respectful, being brushed. But she still has one BIG ick and it is brushing her teeth. Foxy is not tolerent of it at all. I have tried SO SO many different training techniques. Giving her a treat every time she let me lift her gums, which worked, and now i can lift her gums whenever. I did simalar things with the tooth brush as ell.

But the minute i try to put the tooth brush on her teeth or gums, she jerks away. If you cuddle with her and reassure her, she calm down. But the minute you bring her gums up with the tooth brush, she freaks out and growls. I have had her snap and even break skin.

I understand this is a very obvious trigger for her, but the vet and everyone around me all agrees she could really benifit from having her teeth brush. I have tried so many approaches on this but it seems to no avail, work. Is this something i should just give up on? She is old, she has cancer :( and probably won't live another 1-2 years 馃槶 so should i give up on it?
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You might ask your Vet if he/she would recommend a mild tranquilizer prior to brushing her teeth. If that works, you might be looking at brushing her teeth, perhaps every ten days or so, which is a whole lot better than not at all.
You might ask your Vet if he/she would recommend a mild tranquilizer prior to brushing her teeth. If that works, you might be looking at brushing her teeth, perhaps every ten days or so, which is a whole lot better than not at all.
Thanks for the suggestion. Our vet tried a very low dose, but she didnt seem to be very fased by it. She still freaked ourUnfortunatly, our vet will not prescribe any higher then this, he claims he really isn't alowed.. We have bought some chew treats that are supossed to clam her but they also failing.

Any other suggestions would be appreciated too!
Perhaps consider asking your vet about using a product called: Proden Plaque Off, I use it for my dogs who are not fond of the teeth brushing routine, and it works very well for keeping their teeth clean. (Note: it is not for use with dogs who are hypothyroid.)

PlaqueOff Dog Powder - PlaqueOff.gr
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Perhaps consider asking your vet about using a product called: Proden Plaque Off, I use it for my dogs who are not fond of the teeth brushing routine, and it works very well for keeping their teeth clean. (Note: it is not for use with dogs who are hypothyroid.)

PlaqueOff Dog Powder - PlaqueOff.gr
I will ask!
Another suggestion - you could try raw chicken wings or other non-weight bearing bones. Or other natural chews, something she can chew on for 15 - 20 minutes a day. NOT Dentastix or similar, these are rubbish.
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I agree with the above post by @JoanneF
Raw chicken wings are a fantastic natural and safe way for your dog to clean her teeth without any stress.
There is a myth that chicken bones splinter, but this is only if they are cooked !
Raw chicken bones (with skin on) are very soft as our chickens are only a few weeks of age when killed for our use and are "soft".
Failing chicken bones, lamb or pork rib bones and neck bones are great for lasting a little while and help tremendously with the cleaning process.
There is also nutritional value in bone content so watch the diet :giggle:
Any raw bones are safe, please do not use any cooked bones!

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Raw beef, sardines (in water), raw turkey roll, raw beef marrow bones, etc, all have natural enzymes that help clean a dog's teeth.

I will vouch for Plaqueoff, (seaweed) as I have been using it for over 20 yrs, on multiple dogs, with great success.
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Thank you guys! Is there a way to give my foxy girl it even tho she is only 8-9 pounds. The lowest dose is for a 22 pound dog鈥
On the 60 gram bottle I have it says for small dogs (and cats) up to 25 lbs. dosage 1/2 to 1 scoop. (There is a tiny scoop included in the bottle).

I would suggest starting with the lower dose and working up to a higher dosage (if need be).

Do check with your vet first though, especially if your pup is on any other medications.
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On the 60 gram bottle I have it says for small dogs (and cats) up to 25 lbs. dosage 1/2 to 1 scoop. (There is a tiny scoop included in the bottle).

I would suggest starting with the lower dose and working up to a higher dosage (if need be).

Do check with your vet first though, especially if your pup is on any other medications.
For sure! Thanks!
I agree with the above post by @JoanneF
Raw chicken wings are a fantastic natural and safe way for your dog to clean her teeth without any stress.
There is a myth that chicken bones splinter, but this is only if they are cooked !
Raw chicken bones (with skin on) are very soft as our chickens are only a few weeks of age when killed for our use and are "soft".
Failing chicken bones, lamb or pork rib bones and neck bones are great for lasting a little while and help tremendously with the cleaning process.
There is also nutritional value in bone content so watch the diet :giggle:
Any raw bones are safe, please do not use any cooked bones!

./
I give my dog chicken feet. She gets one every morning after our morning walk as a treat and breakfast. She loves eating a chicken foot and it's good for her teeth I'm told.
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I give my dog chicken feet. She gets one every morning after our morning walk as a treat and breakfast. She loves eating a chicken foot and it's good for her teeth I'm told.
Is it dangerous? like will they choke or is there a good chance?.
If they are raw they will be perfectly safe. :)
Never feed cooked bones as these are very likely to splinter :(
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If they are raw they will be perfectly safe. :)
Never feed cooked bones as these are very likely to splinter :(
That what I鈥檝e heard. But I鈥檝e heard raw can break and is not good for their stomachs. Worth a shot tho!
As soon as our dogs swallow their bones or any other food matter, the acidic stomach juices start working and dissolve/soften the bone/food matter very quickly and the process of digestion begins.
Myths and what we have heard can be very worrying, "old wives tales ! ":rolleyes:

There are a few cases where pieces of bone can be passed without digestion having taken place. (pieces of plastic small stones, and strange items can also pass through without a hope of being digested ! )
I just wanted to mention, using your finger to apply enzymic dog toothpaste and coat the teeth is better than not applying at all. It has to be enzymic though. There are also silicone finger brushes available. My dogs prefer the poultry flavored type and actually get excited for it. At least you know if there's any pain, just coating the teeth won't hurt the gums.
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True enough!
Is it dangerous? like will they choke or is there a good chance?.
I have now taken over this account as this was my little sister who is too young to be on this forum. Mods are all good with it, we had a discussion.

We still have the same dog, but its relieving to know that if any raw bones break that they shouldnt get into to much trouble.
I just wanted to mention, using your finger to apply enzymic dog toothpaste and coat the teeth is better than not applying at all. It has to be enzymic though. There are also silicone finger brushes available. My dogs prefer the poultry flavored type and actually get excited for it. At least you know if there's any pain, just coating the teeth won't hurt the gums.
I wish this would work, but she still wont let me rub her gums after she gets a taste of any of the toothpastes\enzymic. Its a great idea thoughh!
True enough!

I have now taken over this account as this was my little sister who is too young to be on this forum. Mods are all good with it, we had a discussion.

We still have the same dog, but its relieving to know that if any raw bones break that they shouldnt get into to much trouble.

I wish this would work, but she still wont let me rub her gums after she gets a taste of any of the toothpastes\enzymic. Its a great idea thoughh!
No matter what kind of bones that you feed, dogs always need supervision, just in case. In the case of marrow bones, I take them away after about 30 minutes. If they are still good, I wrap and refrigerate them for another session.
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I wish this would work, but she still wont let me rub her gums after she gets a taste of any of the toothpastes\enzymic. Its a great idea thoughh!
Have you ever tried brushing without the toothpaste? The action of the toothbrush itself is what dislodges plaque and the toothpaste isn't strictly necessary, or so my dentist tells me. If it's the toothbrush they don't like, gently rubbing the gumline with a clean bit of terrycloth is another alternative.
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