Dog Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,

Just wondering if anyone has tips on teaching a dog to wait when a door is opened before going through. I've gotten Tucker to sit when we come to a door we're going to go through but he'll only sit until my hand starts moving the knob then he'll get up. Ideal situation would be to have him sit (or stand as long as I know he's not going to just run through the door) until I give him the OK to go through. The doors I'm most concerned about are the elevator and house door, not sure if I'll need to do the same thing at every door forever, but currently we use every door as a chance to practice...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,188 Posts
Have him on a short lead and have him sit. When the door opens, if he gets up stay put, tell him to sit again when he does, tell him good boy (or whatever) and then tell him "lets go" and walk through the door.

Never let him through a door if he's not sitting until you tell him to go, even if that means missing an elevator or two.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
813 Posts
If he starts getting up when you reach for the door knob, simply take your hand away. Maybe even walk away from the door. Keep repeating until his bottom stays on the floor when you touch the knob. You can reward at this point. Then progress to slowly opening the door. If he starts getting up/moving forward, close the door again. If he stays in position, reward. Keep repeating until you can open the door with him not getting up or moving forward. Reward generously all the things you like. Do not keep repeating commands.

To proof this, sometimes pretend you are going out, practise the door routine and then don't go out.

Most importantly - don't get cross or frustrated. But be patient and kind. He is learning, not being difficult.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
If he starts getting up when you reach for the door knob, simply take your hand away. Maybe even walk away from the door. Keep repeating until his bottom stays on the floor when you touch the knob. You can reward at this point. Then progress to slowly opening the door. If he starts getting up/moving forward, close the door again. If he stays in position, reward. Keep repeating until you can open the door with him not getting up or moving forward. Reward generously all the things you like. Do not keep repeating commands.

To proof this, sometimes pretend you are going out, practise the door routine and then don't go out.

Most importantly - don't get cross or frustrated. But be patient and kind. He is learning, not being difficult.
Sounds like we're going to spend a lot of time standing in front of doors. Neighbours are going to think I'm crazy haha.

Thanks for the help. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
156 Posts
Ha, we struggled with this with our girl for a long time and honestly, it was just repetition that worked. The more consistent you are (doing things the exact same way, every single time), the faster they learn. Practicing "heel" also helps with doors. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
I agree with icemaiden. It also helps that if every time you ask for a command (sit, down), you also start practicing that they stay in that position until you release (OK!). That way, the training won't always be door specific. For example, at corners, Maia sits and will wait for the OK before moving. Same with doors. And putting down food bowls. etc.

But for now, butt on the floor throughout the whole door opening process. Lots of treats and praise for doing it right. Also make sure that you are also the first one through doors (or stepping out off the curb). Alpha goes first!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I agree with icemaiden. It also helps that if every time you ask for a command (sit, down), you also start practicing that they stay in that position until you release (OK!). That way, the training won't always be door specific. For example, at corners, Maia sits and will wait for the OK before moving. Same with doors. And putting down food bowls. etc.
Thanks, we've been working on duration and distance for his 'sits' and 'downs'... and also building up his 'wait' and getting him to recognize 'OK' as his release word. Slow going but getting a bit better every session. Also sometimes he'll do down when I ask for a sit so working on separating those 2 commands. So all that plus throwing in teaching him some tricks to keep things lively (He'll high five, pound [which is a huge crowd pleaser], shake, and we're working on turn) is quite a bit. Add in the fact that he's just over 8 months old we've got a lot going on with him, being very patient with his learning curve.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
501 Posts
Patience, persistence, and lots of positive reinforcement. The reward has to be more valuable then the excitement of outside. I have been working with Pax on this since since he was a pup and now at almost two he is just now solid on a sit and stay before exiting the door.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top