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Discussion Starter #1
So now that Tucker has nailed spin have switched gears on his tricks and am now working on his play dead/rollover, which is horrible. :)

I've tried holding a treat to his nose and slowly moving back towards his shoulder to make him lay on his side. But even taking it at the smallest perceivable movements in that direction he just doesn't want to roll on his side. (I should interject here that he has no problem laying on his back or side for belly rubs and offers that up himself, just won't be lured into it)

Any ideas on alternative methods, currently all I've got is waiting for him to roll over for a belly rub and trying to catch that. Usually this happens when we're being lazy on the couch and I'm absentmindedly petting him... not the ideal training scenario. lol.

On the plus side the method above has netted a new unexpected behaviour of crawling backwards though. Now I just need to figure out a cue to attach to that to make it into some kind of trick. :)
 

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Hmm, that method worked for me so I don't have an alternate suggestion. It did take some time and we did play dead before roll over. Tip: choose your play dead cue carefully. I plan on having my girl registered as a therapy dog and I made the dumb choice to say "bang" when I cue her to play dead. Probably not appropriate if we're visiting children... So, I've started to remove the word and use a hand cue of me pointing at her.

If you're on FB, there's a group called, "Tricks and Training". The people on there are really helpful :)
 

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Try moving the treat to knee rather than shoulder to get a flip onto a hip. From there move the treat sort of diagonally up and over to shoulder blades and behind or over head (want them to look back a bit to get upper body flat on the ground) and finally stop and feed on the ground where you want the nose. :)

You may need to break it all down into steps over multiple sessions. Some dogs find it very uncomfortable. Perhaps just starting with following treat to knee and getting the hip flip. The building from there.

Watch your body language. Leaning in or over often causes sensitive dogs to scoot back or to pop up because they are a little uncomfortable. I start kneeling or sitting on the ground with soft dogs. Reduces ability to lean over them.

And just something to think about... These tricks are really similar so can be confusing to dogs to discriminate. I teach rollover and play dead in different directions to help. So for Dexter, roll over is to his left. Play dead is to his right!
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Hmm, that method worked for me so I don't have an alternate suggestion. It did take some time and we did play dead before roll over. Tip: choose your play dead cue carefully. I plan on having my girl registered as a therapy dog and I made the dumb choice to say "bang" when I cue her to play dead. Probably not appropriate if we're visiting children... So, I've started to remove the word and use a hand cue of me pointing at her.

If you're on FB, there's a group called, "Tricks and Training". The people on there are really helpful :)
I am on FB, I'll definitely have to check the group out. Thanks!

Try moving the treat to knee rather than shoulder to get a flip onto a hip. From there move the treat sort of diagonally up and over to shoulder blades and behind or over head (want them to look back a bit to get upper body flat on the ground) and finally stop and feed on the ground where you want the nose. :)

You may need to break it all down into steps over multiple sessions. Some dogs find it very uncomfortable. Perhaps just starting with following treat to knee and getting the hip flip. The building from there.

Watch your body language. Leaning in or over often causes sensitive dogs to scoot back or to pop up because they are a little uncomfortable. I start kneeling or sitting on the ground with soft dogs. Reduces ability to lean over them.

And just something to think about... These tricks are really similar so can be confusing to dogs to discriminate. I teach rollover and play dead in different directions to help. So for Dexter, roll over is to his left. Play dead is to his right!
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Thanks Kmes - I'll give that a go and see if we can get any progress. Good tip on the different directions :) Figured I'd build his play dead first then transition that into the rollover.
 

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I taught Aayla by breaking it down into smaller steps. So first it was teaching the hip flip. Making it so I could make her lay on her right or left hip when I wanted. Then it was working on getting her shoulder down. Then her head, and then slowly over. I rewarded each try that was in the right direction! I talk a bit about how I trained play dead here for a few friends:


Here is Zac George talking about how he teaches it:


If that still doesn't work and if you can convince him to roll over onto his back for scratches I would just do that then mark when he did it! It might take a bit longer for him to make an association but after a while it should click with the capturing.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I tried what @kmes suggested with pushing the treat more towards his knee instead of shoulder and that got him to start to move over onto his hip. So that's progress! yay :)

He scoots around a lot while he's trying to figure out what I'm looking for, which is super cute, but not overly helpful. Think I'm going to have to be fairly precise in when I reward.

I'll try and get a video tonight.
 
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