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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello!

We just got a new foxhound puppy who is very hyper and highly motivated by food. We are trying to teach her "sit" but when we have a treat in our hand she freaks out. Clawing at our hand, biting, jumping, barking, howling... I'm not really sure how to teach her. With our previous dog we were able to lead her into a sit with the treat. Any ideas?

Also, we bring our new pup to my parents often who have a dog of their own. Their dog is a 9 year old lab, who is normally friendly. With the puppy she growls and walks away. Is this the dogs communicating to establish dominance? We have keeping them apart, but they do need to learn to be around each other at some point. But I am worried that my parents dog will get to the point of annoyance with the puppy that she may lash out and hurt her. Any thoughts?

Thanks :D
 

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Does she get the treat when she behaves like that? Have you tried a clicker? The timing of the click is more important than the timing of the treat. So you could have her follow you into the kitchen to get a treat after a successful click.
 

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Have you heard of the it's your choice game? There's a video on the sticky post in this section and plenty on YouTube.

Basically you put the treat in your closed fist and just do nothing as she frantically tries to get it. When she backs off, you open your hand. If she goes for it again, close the fist. Only when she sits quietly does she get the treat. **some people will give the treat in the hand, others will reward with a different treat altogether. It's a good impulse control exercise that will help with treat training, and IMO you could do either. Giving the treat in the fist can set you up for a "wait" cue (as in, you can have this when I say okay) and giving a separate treat can set you up for a "leave it" cue (as in, you can NEVER have this item, but will get something else instead).

If she's painful, I'd start by wearing gloves.

Alternatively, you could train with toys as a reward: fetch or tug.
 

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Hello!

Clawing at our hand, biting, jumping, barking, howling... I'm not really sure how to teach her.


Also, we bring our new pup to my parents often who have a dog of their own. Their dog is a 9 year old lab, who is normally friendly. With the puppy she growls and walks away. Is this the dogs communicating to establish dominance? We have keeping them apart, but they do need to learn to be around each other at some point. But I am worried that my parents dog will get to the point of annoyance with the puppy that she may lash out and hurt her. Any thoughts?

Thanks :D[/QUOTE

Teach this.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C4IzTn-kMU0

Your parents dog may be teaching your pup to back off. If you parents dog is growling and walking away he is trying to teach your pup manners. It is what the mother dog or other pups would do if your pup was misbehaving in the litter. I would let your parents dog handle if if it does not get aggressive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks everyone! I try not to give her the treat when she acts up (biting, jumping...) I usually just stand up and walk away. I will try to do the wait game with gloves.
 

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First of all, make sure your new pup is tired out when you start to train. Give her a long romp or walks and games of fetch. That way she'll have less energy to be crazy when training. But yes, the "your choice" game is a very good idea.

In terms of the other dog, it's not about dominance or "being friendly", so much as the adult dog likely trying to teach your puppy manners, or telling her to go away. Just like people, some dogs don't like kids! Sometimes it's really good for a puppy to get disciplined by a stable adult but since I don't know this dog I would be cautious and monitor their interactions. Just don't scold the adult dog for growling or snapping.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Just wanted to give you all a little update, we started playing the "your choice" game with her, with a lot of effort and patience, she no longer snaps at our hands to get treats (unless she is super excited). We also started clicker training. I am not sure if it was the clicker that is helping or if we were just patient but she has learned to sit and to lay down (as long as she isn't distracted).
Thanks everyone :D
 
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