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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Friend of the family recently passed away, leaving behind a 3 year old Basset Hound that nobody in the family wants. :( I am thinking about taking him, but I know nothing about this breed other than what little I remember from watching Dogs 101 ages ago (need regular ear cleaning, and prone to back problems). Anything I should know or consider? I currently live on 150 acres, so he would have plenty of room to get exercise, and own a cat, a Rat Terrier, and a flock of chickens.
 

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Besides keeping the ears clean and keeping an eye on them so you catch any infection early, and the usual be careful with the back not letting them jump off furniture or other high places, and walk them on a harness, they will follow their noses as far as the scent trail will take them, so keep them on leash or a long line.
 

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Hi ToyDragon,

I don't know much about Bassett Hounds, but I think it's wonderful that you're looking out for your friend's dog. So many dogs get dumped in shelters when family members decide that they can't be bothered to take in the best friend of someone who has passed away or has entered a nursing home. I'm fairly sure that is what happened to my own wonderful senior dog, whom I arranged to pull from the shelter less than 24 hours before he was to be euthanized.

Have you met this dog yet? I think the deciding factor will be whether he gets along with your rat terrier and you enjoy his personality. The breed probably won't matter much except that he's a scent hound so he's likely to run off following his nose.

If you can't take him, I would really hope that you work with your friend's family to find a great placement for him, at the very least with a breed rescue and not at the local kill shelter.

Good luck to you all!
 

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Temperament wise, they are usually very nice, loving dogs. I've never met a mean one. They can be a bit difficult to train because they're hard to motivate....Remember they're hounds, so they are very scent oriented. I'd imagine you'd have fun doing activities like nose work or barn hunt.

Health wise, keep in mind that they're not always the healthiest dogs. It's a breed I'd consider getting insurance on. If not from health tested lines, they can have hip and elbow displaysia. Their long backs can be prone to slipped discs and need to be protected from jumping on/off furniture, and ideally also from going up/down stairs. It's very important to keep them thin and NOT let them get overweight.

Their long ears and excessive wrinkling can cause chronic skin and ear infections. Yeast is most common. Regular cleaning is a must. It's a breed that vets will send home with ear ointment to use as needed. They can be prone to cherry eye as well as a condition where the eyelid folds under when it closes, so the hair and eyelashes irritate the eyes. Both of these are genetic and can only be surgically repaired.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The more I read, the more I worry about the long list of health issues they seem to have. I haven't heard anything back yet since yesterday morning when him needing a home was mentioned to me. I would for sure make sure that he and Rockie get along. The Basset is coming from a single animal home, but it sounds like their personality will make it easy for him to adjust. Why walk him on a harness vs a collar?
 

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They have back/neck/disc problem and the harness takes pressure off the neck and spine. Also concur they are big, lovable, good natured mush balls but do have poor health. You might luck out now and again though as I don't k ow this particular dog.
 
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If you do end up taking him in and keeping him be sure to keep his nails trimmed. Every single Bassest I've seen come into our vet hospital has had terrible back and joint problems that are directly affected by nails that have been allowed to grow too long. The nails begin to curl under and force the toes to turn to either side which then affects the rest of the joints, structure, and movement of the dog. When a dog is standing in a comfortable square position the nails should not touch the ground and you shouldn't hear their nails click on the ground when they walk.
 
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