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Discussion Starter #1
Hi there,

I am totally new on this forum, and i basicly just googeld dogforum in need of help.

A person i know got a dog about 2-3 months ago, he has never had a dog, and did not really want a dog, but his wife wanted it and bought it. Now with their 6 birds, 1 cat and a newborn baby they are sick of the dog and wanted to have it put down.

I love dogs, and i just would not let that happen, so i called him up and told them to bring the dog to me instead, worst case I can find it a foreverhome.
I have already alerted the local shelter, but they have no room so in the meantime, he'll have to stay with me.

This is not a bad thing for me really, ive always wanted a dog, but my parrents have allergies :/ This does not mean i have no experience with dogs, ive always been around them(neighbours and such) but never had one for my own.

So now i turn to you, what do i need to know, what where the "Oh sh*t i should have thoght of that" and how do you train a dog?

I guess you need some information, but what i have is very little.
Ive seen him(i know its a he) twice and both times he seemed really scared. The person that now owns it also complains on it not peeing outside, but i think he just hasnt learnd it.
From what I can see, it seems like he has not been sociliced in any good way, and that he has not been trained in any way, or gotten any attention.

I want to turn his life around, and since I have alot of free time, and money to get him all the love and help he could ever need. But I want to to it the right way!

So, anyone that has any tips/links/training tricks/what to expect for a dog loving noob? :p

Best regards

Cyber
 

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I'm so glad you're going to rescue this poor baby. It seems like he was never given the time of day or opportunity to shine :(

I suggest getting in touch with a positive reinforcement trainer.
Also, if you want to switch his food if he's not on a good brand, make sure to do it gradually so his stomach doesn't become upset.

If he's not house trained I would probably keep him attached to you on a leash at all times until he starts to understand that potty needs to happen outside. You can start to see signs of when he needs to go, and bring him out before he has the chance to go inside.
 

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Housetraining

Spend some time looking through this forum. Make sure you have a kennel, some dog food, and try to find a good vet before you need one. Ask the person you are getting the dog from, for the shot records.

Go eat a bowl of ice cream. Chill. This is going to be a wonderful experience for you and that poor dog who now has a good home.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Wow, im just amazed over how fast the responses here :O

I live in Spain, so finding a good vet might be an issue, but ill hear with others in the block if they have any recomandations.

I am also wondering how i should aporoch the dog the first days/weeks, since he seems scared, what should i do to make him feel comfortable around me and trust me?

Best regards

Cyber
 

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I'm no expert but we had many strays and rescues over the years. Best piece of advice is don't make a big deal out of anything starting off.

Give the dog a chance to adjust. If you leave the house, just leave. When you come home, just ignore until the dog is calm. If the dog is really excited and you make a big deal out of it you could be setting yourself up for some separation anxiety. Feeding the dog? Just feed him. etc. Good boy when the dog goes outside is cool.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hi there,
I finally got here home, had to carry her almost all of the way tho, she seems terrified by seeing other people, so its clear that she has not been socialised.

Right now she is laying under the table and seems relaxed.

Any advice on how to build trust?

Best regards

Cyber
 

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Trust can only be earned over time. Be consistently kind and gentle with your new friend, and in time she will learn you can be trusted to care and protect her. It can't be done overnight.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hi there,
Then it seems like I am doing it right, she just seem very afraid, is there anything I can do to make her feel more at home?
Been with her all day, tried to take a couple of walks, but she does not like to be outside, so now i am a little concerned, should I "drag" her out so she can go potty, or wait and let her adjust?

I am going out to buy her some new toys, so we can play or something :p

Best regards

Cyber
 

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Good job on rescueing this dog.
It will take time to adjust, you will see changes in terms of days/weeks/months/years.
My new guy was seriously unhappy for a few months, now at 6 months in his new home, his is a really happy well-adjusted dog.
I'm down to 2 fingered typing (sprained hand) or I'd give more details.
Agree with @jagger. 'do not fuss' over weird scared behaviours. Let her come to you, let her choose when you can. Some things will fade over time as she settles in and begins to feel safe.
Here's a link, long story of a dog rescued from complete neglect & isolation-puppy mill dog. If you read through it, you will get some ideas (your dog is not likely this extreme, but it will give you hope in the first few months.
For now, keep in mind that even nice things are going to feel strange for you dog--your home is a whole new world.
And a dog crate with cushions inside (comfy) & a sheet over top (cozy) & door left open may be a very welcome bit of furniture to a scared (or normal) dog.
My guy loves his crate, & uses it (door open) to sleep, relax, de-stress, lounge.
Hope that helps a bit.
 

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Yes, a kennel with 4 walls and a roof is a great idea. They don't need to be locked in, and honestly I wouldn't do it to a newly introduced dog.

I wouldn't drag her outside, if you have a fenced area then just leave the door open.

Give the dog time. Sit near her for a while, relax, read a book or something but ignore her. Just don't force yourself on her - but take every opportunity to give affection when she is willing to accept it.
 

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I'm not sure about the behavior part but from fostering dogs these are the supplies I always have on hand:

Pee pee pads
Kennel/crate
Baby gates if u need to block him off from part of the house
Food + water in bowls
Treats
Pet stain cleaner
Leash & collar
Toys
Brush
Doggy shampoo
A towel in ur car if u travel w the pup
Attractant spray for him to pee outside
Dog bed/blanket
And since ur parents are allergic... Claritin non drowsy! Lol

Id look online or YouTube on how to approach and train shy dogs :)

P.s you're amazing for taking this dog in! It could have had a horrible fate.
 

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Good job on rescueing this dog.
It will take time to adjust, you will see changes in terms of days/weeks/months/years.
My new guy was seriously unhappy for a few months, now at 6 months in his new home, his is a really happy well-adjusted dog.
I'm down to 2 fingered typing (sprained hand) or I'd give more details.
Agree with @jagger. 'do not fuss' over weird scared behaviours. Let her come to you, let her choose when you can. Some things will fade over time as she settles in and begins to feel safe.
Here's a link, long story of a dog rescued from complete neglect & isolation-puppy mill dog. If you read through it, you will get some ideas (your dog is not likely this extreme, but it will give you hope in the first few months.
For now, keep in mind that even nice things are going to feel strange for you dog--your home is a whole new world.
And a dog crate with cushions inside (comfy) & a sheet over top (cozy) & door left open may be a very welcome bit of furniture to a scared (or normal) dog.
My guy loves his crate, & uses it (door open) to sleep, relax, de-stress, lounge.
Hope that helps a bit.
I just wanted to say thank you for posting that link to Kelso's thread. I just read through the whole thing and it was so inspiring and amazing.
 

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I just wanted to say thank you for posting that link to Kelso's thread. I just read through the whole thing and it was so inspiring and amazing.
Thanks. I so much wish I had read about Kelso's journey in my first three months with Sonic. I would have panicked a lot less, let him be a lot more, and simply been calmer which would have meant less social pressure.

I'd never rescued a dog with a bad past before, and really did not know how much time they need to settle in, or that much of the weird behaviours will dissappear without intervention.

Even positive only training can put pressure on a dog--'here's a cookie, o come on, it's a nice cookie, why don't you want a cookie??? WHAHHHH, what's wrong with my cookies????<----that was me in February.

& so am hoping it helps others new to rescueing dogs with a past.

Yes, Kelso's story is awesome-did not know dogs could come back from that.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Hi everyone!

Thank you all for all the response!
Naela has improved drasticly over just 48 hours!
From being a dog that would wet herself if anyone would come near her, to now sleeping on the couch with me watching a movie!

She is so great! Seems like it was enough to take her out of her stressfull enviroment, and into a calm and quiet house :)

I am surprised over how "smart" she is, she already tells me clearly when its potty time, by standing at the door looking at me :p I have no problem getting her to sleep in her bed in the nights, and if I go out there is hardly any reaction, she does love it when I get back home xD

Only thing she seems new to is taking a walk, she tugs on the leach(might spelled that one wrong :p) and gets incredibly excited by anything from a bike to a bus, but if we come a cross another dog, she just lays flat on the ground and starts to cry :S
Any idea on how I should tackle her distress? She seems so good at everything else, so I want to do this right :)

Again, thanks for all the support, ill try to get a picture of her here!
Also, she is a labrador mix, the previous owner had no idea on the mix tho

Best regards

Cyber
 

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It's great to see how quickly Naela is adapting to your home. I might suggest that you go easy on the walks since she's still settling in. Do you have a yard where she can relieve herself and play?
 

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It's great to see how quickly Naela is adapting to your home. I might suggest that you go easy on the walks since she's still settling in. Do you have a yard where she can relieve herself and play?
I am afraid i live in a apartment, but i am moving to a house in the next few weeks! There she will have alot more space.
To try to keep her in activity, I try to walk her around 5 times a day, and try to keep it 2 trips in the early morning when there is not alot of people/trafic/other dogs outside, 1 trip mid day just to be able to go potty after mid day feeding, and 2 trips, 1 in the evening and 1 time right before bedtime, bedtime is usally around 0100, its pretty silent around that time and she seems alot more at ease :)

Any other advice is most welcome! :)

Best regards

Cyber
 

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Wonderful! She's settling in.
BUT, she is still in the 'new home' stage. The walking behaviour sounds like a dog that is 'on edge' already, so every little thing is bothering her in ways it might not have before.
I don't have a fence, so have the same problem--walking the dog in public in situations the dog is not ready for.
Do your best to avoid triggers whenever you can.
Whenever your dog is interested in treats, use them (look up 'L.A.T. (look at that game) and B.A.T. training, these do rely on a dog that has an interest in treats and gaining enough distance from triggers that your dog is not overwhelmed). Be willing to retreat down another street, up a driveway, or go to a quiet park, just reduce your dogs exposure to things that upset as much as you can. She probably needs at least 2 months to truly settle in to you, your ways, your environment, and in the meantime, she's feeling 'new girl' stress.
If she likes 'up talk', 'soft talk', 'baby talk' in a calm voice, try that for getting her through difficult circumstances.
I can see my guy visibly calm down if I 'chat him up' just before we have to 'bull through' a 'trigger zone' (get by a fenced barking dog, for instance).
If you've ever had difficulty getting used to being in a new job, new school, new home, lost all your friends and had to find new ones, keep that feeling in mind when you think of your dog. It is the same feeling.
Mutual TV-time is awesome. This is the sort of calm buddy-up time your dog needs.
 

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So, when you're walking her, is she by your side? Out front? Wrapped around your legs in fear? She's experiencing alot of newness at the moment.

You being confident and non-reactive will help her greatly. Don't react to her reacting to the environment - it's patience and time.
 

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I sure would not 'drag' her out. You might try luring her out with treats, or a toy she likes, but forcing her to do anything she fears at this point will only set you back, with that trust issue.
 

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Sounds like she is a total sweetie going through a scary period!

I rescued my girl about 1 year ago. She had been born to a mother who was a street dog and was picked up while pregnant. My girl was born in a shelter in eastern Europe and had almost zero interaction with humans. My husband and I adopted her at 7 months old -- she had never been in a house, had extremely minimal human contact, and was terrified of EVERYTHING around her.

Things that really helped:
1. Putting ZERO pressure on her unless necessary. We basically ignored her completely (even if she approached us) unless having to handle her (put on a leash or put her in/out of her crate). When we did handle her we did it completely matter of factly and calmly talking slowly in very low quiet tones.

2. We have no yard (also live in an apartment), so would take her out for walks 4x a day (early AM, late AM, late afternoon, just before bed). These walks were not for exercise, just short trips down to the nearest green patch for her to go pee/poop. If the weather seemed nice and she seemed relaxed, we'd sit outside to let her take in some of the noises/sights/smells. We didn't venture out into the larger parks/louder neighborhoods until about 2-3 weeks after she arrived and seemed comfortable in our little neighborhood.
Physical exercise isn't so important at this stage as she's getting DROWNED in mental overload (it's a scary transition!). Trust me -- she's plenty tired just from the constant edginess and stress that her body is experiencing at the moment. Our girl didn't show playfulness/physical energy until about a month after she arrived. Now she's a high energy crazy thing that needs 2hrs of walking (off leash) every day...but back then a 10 minute walk up and down the street had her exhausted.

3. No training. Seriously -- don't even THINK about "training" this dog until she exhibits almost complete trust in you. Right now your "training" should be showing her that you are on her side and that you aren't going to push her beyond what she can handle. Our girl wouldn't come near us willingly, so we worked on tossing treats a short distance from where we were sitting, then ignoring her completely as she ate them. We tossed them closer and closer to us. Then we'd toss them further away but just glance at her while she ate them, then progressed to watching her eat them, then progressed to her approaching us as we looked at her, then she had to make eye contact with us to get a treat, etc etc. It's SLOW.
We did however push her. She didn't want to walk downstairs (she didn't know how to go up and down stairs). The first 3 days we carried her up and down (our apartment is upstairs), the fourth day we said enough. We put her leash on and without looking at her just started walking SLOWLY down the stairs. She dug her heels in, we kept pressure on the leash -- we showed her "we're going down these regardless, you either fall down resisting or you walk down on your own". When she took a step on her own we'd stop. Then we'd take another step, slight pressure on teh leash -- the more she resisted, the more pressure, the more she tried on her own to go down, we took pressure away. Within 5 minutes she was handling stairs by herself. So you need to find a balance between pushing her to test her limits versus waiting for her to tell you when she's comfortable.

4. NO PUNISHMENT EVER!!!!! At least for the first couple months. Never a mean word, never a nasty tone. This girl needs to get her confidence up. If she's anything like my girl, us making ANY noise would immediately grab her attention. So if she was trying to take food out of the trash we'd just say in a high-pitch sing-songy voice "silly puppy, not for you, please don't do that" -- she would immediately look at us. We'd start walking over there in a very casual "oh I just *happen* to be going this way anyway, it's nothing to do with you" manner and act as if we were doing something in that area by the trash, she would leave. Problem solved. As she gets more confident, you can strengthen you response/negativity as necessary.

Any questions -- just ask!! Sounds like you're doing a wonderful job :)
 
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