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Hi everyone!
We have a rescue red bone hound who is 2.5 years old. She is well behaved and has gone to multiple obedience classes. The only issue she has ever shown is "found food" aggression so we are careful to keep her away from our other dog when eating. She is allowed on both a chair and couch in our media room. A week ago my husband was sitting on that couch with her next to him. He got up to go to bed and told her to get down. She didn't move so he reached down to push her behind off and she snarled, growled and bit him. She has NEVER been aggressive toward either of us. Today, she was on the chair and I told her to get down so I could get the blanket that was under her. I reached down to push her off and she did the same thing and if I hadn't moved quickly, she would have bitten me too. It wasn't a "light" bite either, it would have been bad.
Im assuming this is a "territory" issue. So, does it mean that we simply cannot let her on any furniture from now on or is there something we can do to stop the aggression? Thanks for any guidance! :ponder:
 

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Practice training off. Ask her onto the couch, reward. Then ask her off and throw her a party. Rinse and repeat. Do not move her off the couch as you have been, except with a leash. She is not okay with being moved physically. I suspect most people would not be okay with this either.
 

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Since this seems to be a sudden change, I'd get a vet check to be sure there's no pain or discomfort. If that's not an issue, yes, as @rustedpenguin said, train a down cue so you don't need to physically move her.

I think some dogs aren't ok with being physically moved and it's a different issue than resource guarding, but I have no experience or evidence to support my idea.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks everyone!

We are working with Bella on "off" and she is doing well. We are just making sure not to push her. :)
 

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Hi everyone!
We have a rescue red bone hound who is 2.5 years old. She is well behaved and has gone to multiple obedience classes. The only issue she has ever shown is "found food" aggression so we are careful to keep her away from our other dog when eating. She is allowed on both a chair and couch in our media room. A week ago my husband was sitting on that couch with her next to him. He got up to go to bed and told her to get down. She didn't move so he reached down to push her behind off and she snarled, growled and bit him. She has NEVER been aggressive toward either of us. Today, she was on the chair and I told her to get down so I could get the blanket that was under her. I reached down to push her off and she did the same thing and if I hadn't moved quickly, she would have bitten me too. It wasn't a "light" bite either, it would have been bad.
Im assuming this is a "territory" issue. So, does it mean that we simply cannot let her on any furniture from now on or is there something we can do to stop the aggression? Thanks for any guidance! :ponder:
She's bossy like mine, keep her off high places. Apparently the alpha gets to be up on higher places and she thinks she's boss up there. Mine gets mouthy when she's on the couch with me and I make her stay off unless I invite her. It's their personality so you have to be consistent with it. If I slack, she goes back to that behaviour.
 

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Not wanting to be physically moved has nothing to do with being alpha or sitting in higher places. It's just not a thing.
Really? That's what our vet told us.
 

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Really? That's what our vet told us.
Unless your vet has additional education or a special interest in training and behavior, they're not always the best sources of information on behavior or training. Even if they do have an interest in behavior, they don't always have accurate information. Their specialty is medicine, not learning theory. *

There's a thread in the training and behavior sticky section on dominance in dogs - well worth a read.


* Certainly there are vets with great advice on training and behavior, I know several. But in general they wouldn't be my go to resource.
 

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Unless your vet has additional education or a special interest in training and behavior, they're not always the best sources of information on behavior or training. Even if they do have an interest in behavior, they don't always have accurate information. Their specialty is medicine, not learning theory. *

There's a thread in the training and behavior sticky section on dominance in dogs - well worth a read.


* Certainly there are vets with great advice on training and behavior, I know several. But in general they wouldn't be my go to resource.
Thanks! I appreciate the feedback :)
 
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