Dog Forum banner

1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,639 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
ok, so i read this article, and i got to thinking, how many people assume that their vet is will know their dogs better than they do? probably a lot, so i thought i'd share :) here is the link:

Ten Commandments of Veterinary Office Visits | The Bark

it definitely pays to prepare to go to the vet... now that doesn't mean that you stop and list out your 20 questions before rushing your bleeding dog to the e-vet for emergency surgery or something, but i try to always bring a little notebook with me, there is often A LOT of waiting around, and between comforting my vet-shy dog, and helping the techs/vet deal with him for an exam, i like to write down my thoughts, as well as things the vet might say to me (as much as i can remember of it anyway).

i also thought this would be a good place for members to post their own tips for making vet visits more successful, that way some of our first time dog owners can have a reference for how to go about it all :)



100% free webcam site! | Awesome chicks and it is absolutely free! | Watch free live sex cam - easy as 1-2-3
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,331 Posts
That's a great article Fawkese. Thank you!

One of the things I like to do with regards to any dog health issues is learn as much as I can by doing internet research. This helps me to make better observations of my dogs to report back to the vet. That article points out that the owner and the vet are very much "teammates" in the dog's health care and I have found vets appreciate an educated, aware, owner.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,336 Posts
Thank you Fawkese!

I just want to highlight a few....

III: Letting the staff know if your dog is aggressive.

Nothing is more irritating when an owner is smiling, laughing, or saying "oh, [dog] never bites" as said dog is growling or going for a bite. :X Or, like the article says, the owner sharing with the tech/vet that the dog isn't friendly, will bite, growl, whatever, after it's already happened.

We LOVE it when the owners tell us promptly to be careful and why, and even more when they bring their own muzzles. Bites are taken very seriously. If your dog is stressed out enough to the point of aggression, it's time for the owner to do their homework and try to change the behavior, whether that means more physical handling at home, frequent positive psuedo-visits to the clinic, whatever it takes.

Also, when your dog is acting out and being aggressive, it is not the time to say soothingly "it's okay" or "good dog." It's a really common mistake that people praise dogs when they're not acting appropriately in the clinic. In addition, if your dog is being aggressive, please step back unless the doctor says otherwise: again, dog/cat bites are a huge liability.

Towards the end it also mentions separating the dog from the owner... yes, this works. A lot of owners' stress seems to influence the dog, and many dogs that might be unreasonable while their owners are in the room can behave reasonably when without them. So when your vet suggests taking the animal into the treatment room, let them.

IV: Providing information:
If you're in for a non-routine examination, please, please, please know how and WHAT your dog is eating, how his stools are, any mood or activity changes, etc. It is kind of annoying when we ask, "What are you feeding Molly?" and the client says "Oh gosh, I don't remember. It's in a green bag and we bought it at that feed store." :S Please know the brand, formula, and quantity fed. I know I am familiar with a bunch of dog foods, but I couldn't possibly remember every color on the shelf in every store.... Also, if you want to know how much to feed, it kind of helps for us to know what you're feeding. :)

IX: Treating the entire staff well.
Folks, clinics are made up of a team of people. The author is right on in saying that the whole clinic will know if one client was unpleasant or rude, and they may not be so welcoming next time. If you're nasty enough, you may even be asked to find service elsewhere....

X. Go home with a plan.
We are here to help your pet feel better and stay healthy. Please be sure that you understand what the treatment plan is and how to give medication, etc. If you are confused, just ask! And please finish the medication in full; if you don't think it necessary or have a concern about a new symptom, just call your vet! They'll let you know if you should continue or discontinue use of any meds. And as far as post-op recovery goes, please follow your vets instructions... it is extremely frustrating when we find out a dog who is supposed to be on "crate rest" or confined has not been.

Lastly, I just want to add that the owners should be examining, handling, and doing things their dog doesn't exactly enjoy at home (ie cleaning ears, brushing teeth, etc). The more they are used to being manipulated, the less stressed they will be at the clinic. Other things to practice are standing calmly on a countertop, taking rectal temperatures, CLIPPING NAILS, and the feel of clippers vibrating on their skin. These are things that tend to make animals nervous and if they've experienced it positively at home, it will help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,639 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
That's a great article Fawkese. Thank you!

One of the things I like to do with regards to any dog health issues is learn as much as I can by doing internet research. This helps me to make better observations of my dogs to report back to the vet. That article points out that the owner and the vet are very much "teammates" in the dog's health care and I have found vets appreciate an educated, aware, owner.
that is a good suggestion tess, and i do the same thing :)...

one caveat to folks reading this though, there are lots and lots of conditions that may *look* like one thing to the untrained eye, but really be another. do not rely on your own home diagnosis in order to avoid a vet visit (and the corresponding bill) much of the time, the longer you wait, the more serious the issue becomes, and the less likely it is for treatment to be effective, as well as the longer your pet is forced to live in discomfort/pain. educating yourself can only help your dog, but it isn't a replacement for qualified medical care ;)

Lastly, I just want to add that the owners should be examining, handling, and doing things their dog doesn't exactly enjoy at home (ie cleaning ears, brushing teeth, etc). The more they are used to being manipulated, the less stressed they will be at the clinic. Other things to practice are standing calmly on a countertop, taking rectal temperatures, CLIPPING NAILS, and the feel of clippers vibrating on their skin. These are things that tend to make animals nervous and if they've experienced it positively at home, it will help.
this is a GREAT tip! thank you crock :)



100% free webcam site! | Awesome chicks and it is absolutely free! | Watch free live sex cam - easy as 1-2-3
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,331 Posts
that is a good suggestion tess, and i do the same thing :)...

one caveat to folks reading this though, there are lots and lots of conditions that may *look* like one thing to the untrained eye, but really be another. do not rely on your own home diagnosis in order to avoid a vet visit (and the corresponding bill) much of the time, the longer you wait, the more serious the issue becomes, and the less likely it is for treatment to be effective, as well as the longer your pet is forced to live in discomfort/pain. educating yourself can only help your dog, but it isn't a replacement for qualified medical care ;)
Yeah, just to clarify.... I'm talking about when you have a diagnosis and the dog has been prescribed medication or whatever.... then you do your research into the condition and that way you are better at working with the vet during treatment.

Yes, the internet is not a substitute for a vet visit, nor should anyone delay taking a sick dog to the vets!

(Sometimes doing a little research in preparation of the visit can help you have a more intelligent discussion with the vet about the various possible causes of the symptoms though.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,639 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Yeah, just to clarify.... I'm talking about when you have a diagnosis and the dog has been prescribed medication or whatever.... then you do your research into the condition and that way you are better at working with the vet during treatment.

Yes, the internet is not a substitute for a vet visit, nor should anyone delay taking a sick dog to the vets!

(Sometimes doing a little research in preparation of the visit can help you have a more intelligent discussion with the vet about the various possible causes of the symptoms though.)
oh absolutely, i think most of the members here would go to the vet, i'm just hoping that if someone were reading this, trying to get an online diagnosis or something (not like that ever happens here :rolleyes:) a bit of warning could persuade them to use the interwebz wisely...

i still think it was a fantastic suggestion ;)



100% free webcam site! | Awesome chicks and it is absolutely free! | Watch free live sex cam - easy as 1-2-3
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,331 Posts
oh absolutely, i think most of the members here would go to the vet, i'm just hoping that if someone were reading this, trying to get an online diagnosis or something (not like that ever happens here :rolleyes:) a bit of warning could persuade them to use the interwebz wisely...

i still think it was a fantastic suggestion ;)
Yeah, very good point. LOTS of people read these threads (when you check the stats) and you don't want anyone to get the wrong impression. :eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,782 Posts
I too do enormous amounts of research (if I have time) on what I "think" my dog has...I find that the vets actually appreciate this, as long as you are telling them they are wrong...lol I personally prefer the medical jargon, so I actually ask vets to NOT dumb it down for me...but the advice goes in the other direction, if you feel the vet isn't speaking in a language you understand, please speak up and ask them to simplify....OR my vet will provide me with a handout on the problem...most vets will have som'thing they can print up for you...its a good idea to ask.



Never pay again for live sex! | Hot girls doing naughty stuff for free! | Chat for free!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,782 Posts
If your dog has trained you to feed him nothing but table food; if you have been sharing your own prescription medication with your pooch; if he fell out of the back of a pickup truck because he was not properly tethered; even if he has just eaten a plate of marijuana-laden brownies—you must force yourself to rise above any embarrassment or awkwardness and be truthful with your veterinarian.

lol, reminds me of dogs that eat feminine products.



Never pay again for live sex! | Hot girls doing naughty stuff for free! | Chat for free!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,913 Posts
This Thread is a great idea Fawkese, and everyone else has added some very helpful info as well. :) Especially what Crock mentioned about telling the vet and their staff if your dog is aggressive. One time when I took Honey in I thought the dog in the next room was going to eat my vet and from her reaction she wasn't prepared for his aggressive behavior and the owner was just laughing like an idiot, on the other hand I told her my puppy was nervous and she took her time before doing anything to help my puppy feel very comfortable with her and the visit was very pleasant for all. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,782 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,639 Posts
Discussion Starter #12

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,910 Posts
What a great thread!
So much good advice here!


As far as additional advice goes...

If your dog is highly reactive and/or agressive to other animals let the staff know ahead of time. That way they will be able to either bring you and your dog in through the back or take you immediately to an exam room.

I know this thread is directed more toward dogs, but for cat and other small animal owners, make sure to bring your pets in a crate/pet carrier. It protects you and your pet from injury as well as prevents then from escaping.
I know this is common sense, but I have seen several cat owners get scratched and bitten when their cat was frightened by a dog at my vet's office!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,639 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
What a great thread!
So much good advice here!


As far as additional advice goes...

If your dog is highly reactive and/or agressive to other animals let the staff know ahead of time. That way they will be able to either bring you and your dog in through the back or take you immediately to an exam room.

I know this thread is directed more toward dogs, but for cat and other small animal owners, make sure to bring your pets in a crate/pet carrier. It protects you and your pet from injury as well as prevents then from escaping.
I know this is common sense, but I have seen several cat owners get scratched and bitten when their cat was frightened by a dog at my vet's office!

common sense, IMO is actually a rare thing ;)... i've seen lots of people with their cats, just wrapped in a towel or something, i don't think they understand how frightened they can get in these situations... even a smaller dog might benefit from being in a carrier at the vet, it might help them to feel safe in such a scary environment.

great advice kmes :)



100% free webcam site! | Awesome chicks and it is absolutely free! | Watch free live sex cam - easy as 1-2-3
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,135 Posts
Only thing that I am sure is listed but I want to reiterate (or mention) is that when anything happens, vomiting, diarrhea, strange behavior, write it down even if its the first time it has happened, include date and time and any other details like was the vomit food or bile (of course after a few incidents if its food and happens after eating and then playing and nothing else has happened afterwards you stop having to write these down ;) ) was the diarrhea formed at all, like pudding, liquid, projectile/watery, etc. Also think of ANYTHING that happened around the same time (like I listed with eating then playing soon after, or if the dog was outside and came in then got sick) again I think its best to stress that some situations you will realize are not urgent and will know how to handle them or recognize them later on.

Hope that made sense lol I find it helped us a lot in past situation to let our vet know where the dog was, what happened before the situation, if this was the first time or its happened before, etc. We easily and quickly diagnosed Harvick with food allergies and didn't have to spend lots of money running tests because we had so many details
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,639 Posts
Discussion Starter #16

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,288 Posts
Great thread with some really useful advice. I'd also add that, for new dog owners, check out your local vets before you decide which one to register with. It's important that you have confidence in them - and probably a good idea to find this out before you're facing him/her with a sick dog.

I had a free consultation with a couple of vets before I got my puppy and it enabled me to select one I felt happy with. Ironically I ended up changing mine after a couple of months because, after I got my puppy, I decided to feed him a raw food diet which my vet was totally opposed to. Had I known I was going to do this before I got him, I wouldn't have registered with my first vet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,639 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
another great tip sarah w! figuring out things like where they are, what their hours are (mine is open on saturdays, and has an on-call vet, so not e-vet for my guys) are good things to do. as well as how many doctors work out of the same office, as well as if they can see ALL of your pets as opposed to just some of them (rabbits for example are considered "exotic" animals, not all offices will take them)



100% free webcam site! | Awesome chicks and it is absolutely free! | Watch free live sex cam - easy as 1-2-3
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top